Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLocal Government Ordinances
IN THE NEWS

Local Government Ordinances

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
In a move criticized as a "direct attack" on local growth controls, the Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would give developers automatic extensions on building permits when citizens approve slow-growth initiatives. The bill, by Sen. Jim Ellis (R-San Diego), would also grant the nine-month permit extensions to builders adversely affected by growth-limiting laws passed by city councils or county boards of supervisors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In San Juan Capistrano it is now illegal to toss your trash into someone else's commercial garbage bin. In Santa Ana, shop owners can no longer hawk their wares outside their own doors. And in Laguna Beach, those who would dig a hole in the sand be warned: There could be a misdemeanor ticket in your future. The millennium ends thus, with yet more laws on the books and less wiggle room for miscreants.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly on Tuesday passed and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian legislation that would reinforce the power of local governments to close gay bathhouses. The measure, approved by a 58-0 vote, would put into state law the right of local agencies to declare bathhouses a nuisance and order them shut down if they permit or encourage sexual activity that could lead to the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1996 | From Reuters
The Federal Communications Commission adopted hotly debated rules Tuesday to prevent local governments from slapping curbs on where homeowners and businesses can place television antennas and dishes. The regulations prohibit local laws, rules, private covenants and homeowner association rules that spoil TV reception--be it traditional broadcast, satellite-delivered or so-called wireless cable TV transmitted over radio waves and received via a dish.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | DAN MORAIN and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major victory for the tobacco industry, the state Assembly on Thursday approved legislation that would invalidate new local efforts in Los Angeles and elsewhere in California to restrict smoking. Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr., the Inglewood Democrat who authored the bill, said he expects the legislation to clear the Senate and be sent to Gov. Pete Wilson, although pressure from anti-smoking advocates is certain to become intense. "I don't carry bills to die," Tucker said.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | DAN MORAIN and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major victory for the tobacco industry, the state Assembly on Thursday approved legislation that would invalidate new local efforts in Los Angeles and elsewhere in California to restrict smoking. Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr., the Inglewood Democrat who authored the bill, said he expects the legislation to clear the Senate and be sent to Gov. Pete Wilson, although pressure from anti-smoking advocates is certain to become intense. "I don't carry bills to die," Tucker said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In San Juan Capistrano it is now illegal to toss your trash into someone else's commercial garbage bin. In Santa Ana, shop owners can no longer hawk their wares outside their own doors. And in Laguna Beach, those who would dig a hole in the sand be warned: There could be a misdemeanor ticket in your future. The millennium ends thus, with yet more laws on the books and less wiggle room for miscreants.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1996 | From Reuters
The Federal Communications Commission adopted hotly debated rules Tuesday to prevent local governments from slapping curbs on where homeowners and businesses can place television antennas and dishes. The regulations prohibit local laws, rules, private covenants and homeowner association rules that spoil TV reception--be it traditional broadcast, satellite-delivered or so-called wireless cable TV transmitted over radio waves and received via a dish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | LISA ADDISON
A group of Orange County libraries has received a $59,400 federal grant to make local government forms, ordinances, regulations, job listings, environmental impact reports and other public documents available on the World Wide Web. The group includes the Orange County Law Library, the county system and libraries at UC Irvine, Newport Beach and Santa Ana.
REAL ESTATE
July 22, 1990 | F. SCOTT JACKSON and STEVEN SOLOMON, F. Scott Jackson is a partner with a large Orange County law firm. Steve Solomon is president of a Southland company that specializes in the conversions of co-ops and community apartments. and
While much of the Southland's real estate market has ground to a halt, one segment of the marketplace is speeding along with appreciation rates upward of 20%--sometimes as high as 100%. Long considered "white elephants" in terms of California's skyrocketing sales and prices, the 10,000-plus stock cooperatives and community apartments (own-your-owns) in greater Los Angeles are among the hottest properties around, thanks to the trend of converting the properties to condominiums.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | DAN MORAIN and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major victory for the tobacco industry, the state Assembly on Thursday approved legislation that would invalidate new local efforts in Los Angeles and elsewhere in California to restrict smoking. Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr., the Inglewood Democrat who authored the bill, said he expects the legislation to clear the Senate and be sent to Gov. Pete Wilson, although pressure from anti-smoking advocates is certain to become intense. "I don't carry bills to die," Tucker said.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | DAN MORAIN and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major victory for the tobacco industry, the state Assembly on Thursday approved legislation that would invalidate new local efforts in Los Angeles and elsewhere in California to restrict smoking. Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr., the Inglewood Democrat who authored the bill, said he expects the legislation to clear the Senate and be sent to Gov. Pete Wilson, although pressure from anti-smoking advocates is certain to become intense. "I don't carry bills to die," Tucker said.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
In a move criticized as a "direct attack" on local growth controls, the Assembly passed legislation Tuesday that would give developers automatic extensions on building permits when citizens approve slow-growth initiatives. The bill, by Sen. Jim Ellis (R-San Diego), would also grant the nine-month permit extensions to builders adversely affected by growth-limiting laws passed by city councils or county boards of supervisors.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly on Tuesday passed and sent to Gov. George Deukmejian legislation that would reinforce the power of local governments to close gay bathhouses. The measure, approved by a 58-0 vote, would put into state law the right of local agencies to declare bathhouses a nuisance and order them shut down if they permit or encourage sexual activity that could lead to the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1999
Orange County has embarked on the new year with substantial turnover in county government leadership. The most visible changes have been in law enforcement, with a new sheriff and district attorney. The Board of Supervisors has a new member in Cynthia Coad, and the departure of her predecessor, William G. Steiner, has led to a new chairman, Charles V. Smith. Steve E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
A proposed Cal State Northridge project that has attracted national attention because of an ambitious state university partnership with a private builder has run into a major snag that could delay construction more than a year. Los Angeles City Councilman Hal Bernson, whose district includes CSUN, said he is reversing his position and will not support pivotal state legislation that the developer said is needed to keep the $150-million project on course.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|