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Local Government State Aid

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NEWS
January 8, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of business, building and local government groups called on Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday to help financially struggling cities and counties--setting up what could be a major tussle in this year's state budget battle. "We think it's one of the most critical issues facing the state," Assemblyman Michael Sweeney (D-Hayward) said, adding that "unfortunately [Wilson] has not shown a willingness" to assist local government.
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NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Controller Kathleen Connell on Thursday proposed a new formula for distributing local sales tax revenue among cities and counties on the basis of population rather than the jurisdiction where sales take place. Her plan is designed to eliminate financial incentives that now encourage local governments to compete for retail centers like strip malls and auto dealerships instead of housing and manufacturing facilities that are better for economic health.
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NEWS
May 12, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson will propose $225 million more for California's financially ailing cities and counties this week as a way to share some benefits from a booming state economy. The funds are aimed at offsetting some of the revenue that the state took from local governments during the recession in 1993 and 1994. The money was welcomed Sunday by struggling local administrators--particularly in Los Angeles, where county officials expect to receive from a third to half of the windfall.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Usually, Lake County can't afford to keep metal detectors in its courthouse. So after authorities put one outside a notorious murder trial recently, they got chills when it scared some people away. "What does that tell you?" asked Adam Ayala, the court administrator. "I'm sure some people are packing heat." Safety is not only a worry in the courthouse. The sheriff in this rustic resort community north of Napa Valley struggles to keep cops on the street too. Deputies get just $12 an hour.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the first time in three years, the release of the state budget proposal did not produce an immediate cry of fiscal distress from Orange County leaders. Rather, an unusual atmosphere of encouragement greeted the release Friday of Gov. Pete Wilson's plan to give local governments more authority and money to manage critical services. At the root of this optimism is a budget plan that would actually transfer $1.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
Gov. Pete Wilson says he does not foresee a time--even in a booming economy--when student fees at California's universities will be reduced to their old levels or when local governments regain their lost money from Sacramento. The reckoning is now and the tempering of state largess is permanent, the governor indicated in recent conversations with The Times after the budget was signed. "Our generosity has out-spanned our prosperity by a couple of years. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992
For a biography of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy, I would like to hear from any friends, relatives, co-workers, or confidants, with any anecdotes, photos, letters, etc. SHARON RICH, 101 Cedar Lane, Teaneck, NJ 07666
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislation has outlined more than $500 million in potential savings for local government, but Orange County officials say the laws amount to little more than paper-shuffling and are not expected to free up any real money for needy programs. The legislation, addressing more than 70 possible areas of cost-cutting, was written to offer some relief to California counties after the shift of $2.6 billion in local property tax revenue to the state. But County Budget Director Ronald S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
We ought to lock Gov. Pete Wilson and state lawmakers up for a night in the emergency ward of County/USC Medical Center. Put them in the midst of the gunshot and stabbing victims, the crack crazies, and the men and women hovering near death from heart attacks and diabetic comas. Let them share the fears of patients, nurses and doctors that the next person through the door could open fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's threat to defy Gov. Pete Wilson became reality Tuesday when the Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to support a policy of ignoring any state order to take as much as $2.1 billion in property tax revenue away from California's 58 county governments. "During frustrating times like this, our county must take this type of action," Supervisor Thomas F.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson will propose $225 million more for California's financially ailing cities and counties this week as a way to share some benefits from a booming state economy. The funds are aimed at offsetting some of the revenue that the state took from local governments during the recession in 1993 and 1994. The money was welcomed Sunday by struggling local administrators--particularly in Los Angeles, where county officials expect to receive from a third to half of the windfall.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of business, building and local government groups called on Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday to help financially struggling cities and counties--setting up what could be a major tussle in this year's state budget battle. "We think it's one of the most critical issues facing the state," Assemblyman Michael Sweeney (D-Hayward) said, adding that "unfortunately [Wilson] has not shown a willingness" to assist local government.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Now that the loss in Orange County's investment fund has been estimated at $2.02 billion, or 27% of its original $7.4-billion principal, city managers and superintendents of school districts that lost money can begin looking for ways to make up the shortfall. But they don't have far to look. For most, fund losses that may logically clip 27% from each city or district's investment will mean yet more tightening of the belt and making do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994 | GLENN F. BUNTING and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Federico Pena released $50 million in emergency federal funds Thursday to assist in the demolition and reconstruction of damaged freeways--the largest allocation yet for transportation systems crippled by the earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1994 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors on Friday rejected a $6.6-billion package of earthquake and economic recovery proposals, saying they feared the state Legislature would oppose the scope of the plan and balk at approving any money for earthquake repairs. The plan was submitted to the board by Chief Administrative Officer Sally Reed at a hastily called meeting late Friday to address recovery costs. County officials hope to devise a plan that will be used by state and federal officials as a blueprint for earthquake recovery and relief efforts.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | KEVIN JOHNSON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the first time in three years, the release of the state budget proposal did not produce an immediate cry of fiscal distress from Orange County leaders. Rather, an unusual atmosphere of encouragement greeted the release Friday of Gov. Pete Wilson's plan to give local governments more authority and money to manage critical services. At the root of this optimism is a budget plan that would actually transfer $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1993 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an 11th-hour reassessment before crucial budget hearings begin Monday, Los Angeles County officials on Friday said they plan to shift hundreds of millions of dollars to the Sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office by making much deeper cuts in benefits and services for the poor. "There's no new money here," said county Chief Administrative Officer Harry Hufford. "It's just a shell game," with tax funds being shifted from one department to another, he said.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
For once, Republicans gathering here this week for their fall convention are not scheduled to hear the battles over gay rights and abortion that have typically dominated past GOP meetings. Part of the lesson the GOP learned when the party fared poorly in last year's election is that such internal fights over emotionally charged social issues often help the Democrats. But nature and politics hate a vacuum. So as Republicans head to the GOP convention, many are still prepared for a skirmish.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson proposed Friday accelerating changes in the relationship between state and local government by shifting more money to counties annually and delegating control over a vast array of social services. If approved by the Legislature, Wilson's transfer of state money would total more than $5 billion and amount to about 13% of the $40-billion state general fund.
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