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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1985 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
Supervisor Bruce Nestande and contributors to his campaign for lieutenant governor are not exempt from Orange County's tough restrictions on political contributions, a Superior Court judge ruled Thursday morning. After a 90-minute hearing, Orange County Superior Court Judge Judith M. Ryan decided that the county's so-called TIN CUP campaign ordinance "is not unconstitutional on its face or in its application" and that it applies to supervisors when they run for local or statewide office.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 2, 2013
Re "Slap a fee on carry-out bags," Editorial, April 30 In your editorial about plastic bags, you omitted discussing another way in which those bags are utilized. Those of us who are responsible dog owners use plastic bags to dispose of our pets' droppings, in accordance with local law. I, for one, find plastic grocery bags to be of convenient assistance in being a responsible citizen. Robert G. Brewer Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: A 'cranky' Gov. Brown Letters: Getting into and out of Israel Letters: Mexico's hypocrisy on border security
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998
Local law and policy makers adopted regulations covering everything from gun sale curbs to improving sanitation conditions in restaurants. San Marino gave the green light to alcohol sales in restaurants, while Pasadena residents found a way to have eternal rest in columbaria. Here's a sampling of local laws approved in 1997. Los Angeles County No parking--Since 1991, the county has prohibited parking cars in frontyards. But enforcing the measure required hearings, witnesses and costly paperwork.
OPINION
January 3, 2013
The Obama administration has spent nearly four years trying to convince states and local law enforcement that the federal immigration program known as Secure Communities is narrowly targeted to deporting dangerous criminals. It's not. And late last month, the administration finally conceded as much when it announced long-overdue reforms that should restore some credibility and fairness to the controversial program. Secure Communities was created to identify "dangerous criminal aliens" for deportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
A bill being drafted by a state legislator would limit local law enforcement from holding arrestees on behalf of immigration authorities seeking to deport them. Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco) said he is finalizing amendments to a bill that would be the first statewide measure to counter the Secure Communities enforcement program, which requires law enforcement agencies to forward to immigration authorities the fingerprints of all arrestees booked into local jails. If those authorities identify a candidate for deportation, they can issue a detainer, which asks the agency to hold them beyond the time when they would normally be released so immigration agents can take custody.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
In a rare endorsement for the Fullerton Police Department, dozens of residents stood before the City Council and passionately urged it to put off any discussion of disbanding the beleaguered agency. The Fullerton City Council voted 3 to 2 to reject a proposal to explore replacing the century-old Police Department with the Orange County Sheriff's Department. The vote just before midnight on Tuesday was a sign of how important local law enforcement is to its residents — even as it continues to respond to criticism since last year's fatal beating of Kelly Thomas, a mentally ill homeless man. The beating and its aftermath led to two officers being charged in connection with the killing and three council members being recalled and replaced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000
Re "General Accounting Office to Probe INS' Role in Scandal," March 17: When the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department work together in enforcing laws, it's called "cooperation." When local law enforcement agencies work together with the FBI, it's also called "cooperation." Why does Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Los Angeles) call it "collusion" when the LAPD and the Immigration and Naturalization Service work together in enforcing laws? ROBERT H. DAHL Los Angeles
NATIONAL
October 3, 2012 | Ken Dilanian and Brian Bennett
A federal domestic security effort to help state and local law enforcement catch terrorists by setting up more than 70 information-sharing centers around the country has threatened civil liberties while doing little to combat terrorism, a two-year examination by a Senate subcommittee found. The so-called fusion centers were created in 2003 after the Sept. 11 commission concluded that federal, state and local law enforcement agencies needed to collaborate more in counter-terrorism efforts.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | Associated Press
The Brady law's requirement that local law enforcement officials run background checks on anyone wanting to buy a firearm is unconstitutional, a federal judge ruled Monday. But U.S. District Judge Charles C. Lovell left in place the law's five-day waiting period to purchase a gun. During the waiting period, local law enforcers are supposed to check to be sure a gun buyer is an adult and doesn't have a felony record or a drug, alcohol or mental problem that would bar a purchase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2012 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
A Secret Service official said Newport Beach city administrators are asking the wrong people to pay for police protection at presidential campaign events. It's the service that is responsible for the candidates' security, not the campaigns, said Max Milien, an agency spokesman. Any cost concerns should be directed to the agency. Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff billed the campaigns of President Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney for police security at their separate fundraisers this year in the city.
OPINION
December 7, 2012 | By Petra Bartosiewicz
When it comes to homeland security, we've been seduced for more than a decade by a "preemptive" mandate that directs us to catch terrorists before they strike next. Where law enforcement once investigated crimes to determine who was responsible and how they could be prosecuted, it now also gathers intelligence to prevent potential future crimes. This mandate, however, has been characterized by a distinct absence of actual terrorist plots. Instead, we've seen an increasingly familiar pattern - the most recent case in the last few weeks involved four young Southern Californians who were arrested in a case built largely by a well-paid informant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Lee Romney and Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris told local law enforcement agencies Tuesday that they were not obligated to comply with a federal program whose stated goal is to deport illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes. It was Harris' first public assessment of Secure Communities. Under the program launched in 2008, all arrestees' fingerprints are sent to immigration officials, who may ask police and sheriff's departments to hold suspects for up to 48 hours after their scheduled release so they can be transferred to federal custody.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GRAHAM, N.C. - In this southern mill town, tortillas and bolillos are as common as Carolina barbecue sandwiches. Spanish-language advertisements tout Latino-owned restaurants, garages, churches and used-tire lots, and banners lining the downtown streets proclaim, "Preserving our heritage - promoting our future. " But protesters who gathered downtown last month in Court Square, near the statue of a Confederate soldier, delivered a different message: "We Want Respect" and "Terry Johnson Stop Lying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
The American Civil Liberties Union is suing Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca on behalf of people who say they were denied bail for minor offenses after being flagged by immigration authorities. British filmmaker Duncan Roy, who says he spent nearly three months in L.A. County jails without a chance to post bail, is one of the five plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which will be filed today in U.S. District Court. Roy was arrested Nov. 15 in Malibu on an extortion charge. He was in the country legally but was identified as a suspected illegal immigrant through a federal program called Secure Communities, which sends the fingerprints of all arrestees through an immigration database.
NATIONAL
October 3, 2012 | Ken Dilanian and Brian Bennett
A federal domestic security effort to help state and local law enforcement catch terrorists by setting up more than 70 information-sharing centers around the country has threatened civil liberties while doing little to combat terrorism, a two-year examination by a Senate subcommittee found. The so-called fusion centers were created in 2003 after the Sept. 11 commission concluded that federal, state and local law enforcement agencies needed to collaborate more in counter-terrorism efforts.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Gov. Jerry Brown's veto of the Trust Act late Sunday raised some interesting questions. Brown said he supported the goal of the bill, which would have set some limits on a controversial federal immigration enforcement program.  But the governor said he could not support the Trust Act because of a fatal flaw that would have required police to release some immigrants who may be involved in serious crimes, such as child abuse or drug sales, before they...
OPINION
May 2, 2013
Re "Slap a fee on carry-out bags," Editorial, April 30 In your editorial about plastic bags, you omitted discussing another way in which those bags are utilized. Those of us who are responsible dog owners use plastic bags to dispose of our pets' droppings, in accordance with local law. I, for one, find plastic grocery bags to be of convenient assistance in being a responsible citizen. Robert G. Brewer Sherman Oaks ALSO: Letters: A 'cranky' Gov. Brown Letters: Getting into and out of Israel Letters: Mexico's hypocrisy on border security
OPINION
August 29, 2012
Re "Baca may defy proposed Trust Act," Aug. 25 L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca's commitment to violate a proposed state law he disagrees with in favor of a discretionary federal immigration law he prefers smacks of political opportunism, not public service. Baca's statements make clear the need for the governor to sign the Trust Act. Baca misunderstands federal law. It provides only for voluntary cooperation by local law enforcement with immigration agency detention requests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
This year's legislative battle over immigration seemed to come to a draw when Gov. Jerry Brown signed one key bill but vetoed another. Immigration rights advocates, however, said Monday that the political give-and-take was largely an illusion. They lost. The bill that Brown signed, which lets some young immigrants have driver's licenses, allows nothing beyond what is permitted under a new federal program granting a two-year reprieve from deportation. But the bill that Brown vetoed - the Trust Act - was among the most closely watched pieces of immigration legislation in the country.
OPINION
August 29, 2012
Re "Baca may defy proposed Trust Act," Aug. 25 L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca's commitment to violate a proposed state law he disagrees with in favor of a discretionary federal immigration law he prefers smacks of political opportunism, not public service. Baca's statements make clear the need for the governor to sign the Trust Act. Baca misunderstands federal law. It provides only for voluntary cooperation by local law enforcement with immigration agency detention requests.
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