Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLockbox
IN THE NEWS

Lockbox

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 8, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
The "lockbox" is back. The "lockbox," you may recall, was the concept presidential candidate Al Gore used during the 2000 election to signify his devotion to the security of Social Security. The principle supposedly was to sequester the program's annual surplus, which was then running about $150 billion a year, so that it couldn't be frittered away on irresponsible government spending. After the election, the lockbox disappeared from public discourse. But the idea that the government is squandering Social Security assets, leaving nothing to pay benefits, has never faded.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 8, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
The "lockbox" is back. The "lockbox," you may recall, was the concept presidential candidate Al Gore used during the 2000 election to signify his devotion to the security of Social Security. The principle supposedly was to sequester the program's annual surplus, which was then running about $150 billion a year, so that it couldn't be frittered away on irresponsible government spending. After the election, the lockbox disappeared from public discourse. But the idea that the government is squandering Social Security assets, leaving nothing to pay benefits, has never faded.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001
I really enjoy the ranting of Robert Scheer. On Aug. 28 he wrote about raiding the Social Security lockbox and what a bunch of dimwits we are for letting this happen (Commentary). As a reader pointed out (letter, Sept. 3), the Social Security lockbox is a myth and those who believe this fiction are indeed dimwits. This raid on the lockbox, according to Scheer, was caused by a minuscule tax cut, which in 2001 is less that 3% of the total budget. The downturn in the economy is what is causing the Social Security surplus to dwindle.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2009 | Martin Eichner
Question: The house I rent is being sold because the owner is not paying the mortgage. The real estate agent wants to put a "for sale" sign in the yard and a lockbox on the front door. I'm moving next month but feel the sign and lockbox are a violation of my privacy. Can I ask the agent not to do these things? Answer: Even without the current foreclosure problem, the process of selling rental property can be a difficult situation between tenants and property owners. However, your rights are covered by California Civil Code Section 1954.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001
Re Ronald Brownstein's commentary, "Resurfacing Gore Has the Chance to Reenter the Tax Debate," Aug. 27: I hope Al Gore gives President-select Bush a resounding "I told you so!" Gore certainly has the right to act a little pompous and angry now that the Congressional Budget Office is forecasting the budget surplus falling. The Bush administration now has to borrow $9 billion in Social Security funds (Aug. 28) for Bush to carry out his agenda--from missile defense to faith-based charities.
OPINION
May 28, 2005
Re Social Security reform: As I continue to read about President Bush's concern about a Social Security crisis, I can't help but wonder: Are our memories so short that we have forgotten Al Gore's "lockbox"? During the 2000 presidential campaign Gore maintained that we should put aside the surpluses that existed at the time to shore up Social Security. His opponent, Bush, said that was not necessary, we should use the money instead for tax cuts. Now I hear Bush say Social Security is in a crisis.
OPINION
September 10, 2002
Re "Government Pensions," letter, Sept. 9: As an employee of the state of California for 34 years, my salary had about 6% withheld for the pension fund, with interest rates set by the state, not the free market. I am thus one of many thousands of state employees who are receiving pensions of our own money. We are not "living off the taxpayers." If civic coffers are now being strained, it's because money never stays in a "lockbox" but gets spent elsewhere, and then has to be repaid.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2009 | Martin Eichner
Question: The house I rent is being sold because the owner is not paying the mortgage. The real estate agent wants to put a "for sale" sign in the yard and a lockbox on the front door. I'm moving next month but feel the sign and lockbox are a violation of my privacy. Can I ask the agent not to do these things? Answer: Even without the current foreclosure problem, the process of selling rental property can be a difficult situation between tenants and property owners. However, your rights are covered by California Civil Code Section 1954.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2000
Third-party candidates should have some voice in the presidential debates. Pat Buchanan, Ralph Nader and others would add breadth and depth to what is arguably one of the most important stops on the way to the November election, but the Republican and Democratic parties want none of it. The Presidential Debate Commission's refusal to allow Nader to even be seated in the audience at the Oct. 3 debate was the act of a frightened child. The use of police to enforce the refusal was much more than childish.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why would a burglar wield a screwdriver and sledgehammer--or maybe even a power drill--to pry apart sturdy metal real estate lockboxes and retrieve the house key inside the box, when the very same tools could be used to attack the door itself? "This is absolutely stupid," Arcadia Police Detective Bernie Bernstein said Tuesday of the newest crime spree in the San Gabriel Valley.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2007 | From Reuters
NetSuite Inc., a software maker controlled by Oracle Corp. founder Larry Ellison that has filed to go public, said Tuesday that Ellison had agreed to reduce his influence at the company. The move addresses concerns that shareholders who invest in the initial public offering would not have had much say in how the company is run, given Ellison's large stake in NetSuite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2006 | Steve Hymon and Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa unveiled a budget Thursday that digs into city reserves to counter a continuing deficit while raising fees to pay for what would be a major increase in policing for America's second-largest city. The budget is a record $6.7 billion, bolstered by revenue from a booming economy and housing market. And its emphasis is on public safety, an area the mayor knows residents care about deeply.
OPINION
May 28, 2005
Re Social Security reform: As I continue to read about President Bush's concern about a Social Security crisis, I can't help but wonder: Are our memories so short that we have forgotten Al Gore's "lockbox"? During the 2000 presidential campaign Gore maintained that we should put aside the surpluses that existed at the time to shore up Social Security. His opponent, Bush, said that was not necessary, we should use the money instead for tax cuts. Now I hear Bush say Social Security is in a crisis.
REAL ESTATE
February 2, 2003 | Jeff Bertolucci, Special to The Times
Kirk Tatman did not have an open house the morning he put his Lake Forest condo up for sale. He wasn't even home. So he was unprepared for the rush of real estate agents gaining entry to his home with the house key in the lockbox hanging from the door. "Before we got home that afternoon, four real estate agents had already walked through our house. We weren't prepared," he said of the house, which wasn't clean, "and the bed wasn't made."
OPINION
September 10, 2002
Re "Government Pensions," letter, Sept. 9: As an employee of the state of California for 34 years, my salary had about 6% withheld for the pension fund, with interest rates set by the state, not the free market. I am thus one of many thousands of state employees who are receiving pensions of our own money. We are not "living off the taxpayers." If civic coffers are now being strained, it's because money never stays in a "lockbox" but gets spent elsewhere, and then has to be repaid.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government had to pry open the Social Security "lockbox" to obtain funds to finance spending in the fiscal year that recently ended, the Bush administration said Monday. In its final accounting for fiscal 2001, which concluded Sept. 30, the U.S. Treasury said it spent $33 billion in surplus Social Security funds to offset a deficit in its other accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
A burglar in Sylmar has given a new meaning to the words "open house." For the first time in the San Fernando Valley, a burglar has figured out how to bypass a security system designed to protect homes that are being shown by real-estate agents, police said. Three Sylmar homes have been burglarized since Oct. 7, when a thief broke into the electronic lockbox on the front door of a house, taking the key and walking away with valuables he found inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999
A bill requiring biological specimens to be placed in lockboxes when left outside of medical facilities has been signed into law, an official said Tuesday. SB 765, which Gov. Gray Davis signed last week, was introduced after four boys broke into unsecured metal laboratory boxes left for pickup outside a Burbank medical clinic last February and played with blood, urine and other biological specimens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2001
I really enjoy the ranting of Robert Scheer. On Aug. 28 he wrote about raiding the Social Security lockbox and what a bunch of dimwits we are for letting this happen (Commentary). As a reader pointed out (letter, Sept. 3), the Social Security lockbox is a myth and those who believe this fiction are indeed dimwits. This raid on the lockbox, according to Scheer, was caused by a minuscule tax cut, which in 2001 is less that 3% of the total budget. The downturn in the economy is what is causing the Social Security surplus to dwindle.
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | GREG MILLER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration warned House GOP leaders Friday that tumbling revenues might force the government to spend up to $15 billion of the Social Security surplus this year, congressional sources said, signaling that the budget outlook has worsened far more swiftly than the White House has previously acknowledged. The disclosure by White House Budget Director Mitchell E. Daniels Jr. prompted a scramble among Republican lawmakers to find a way to avoid taking that politically hazardous step.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|