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Lockerbie

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
In December 1988, the residents of a small Scottish town hosted unusual guests: dozens of corpses that lay for days in streets, fields and gardens until investigators could process them as forensic evidence. The dead were the victims of the Pan Am 103 bombing that claimed 259 passengers and crew, as well as 11 people on the ground. Deborah Brevroot wrote her tribute to “The Women of Lockerbie,” now onstage at Theatricum Botanicum, eight years before  9/11. Despite its sentimentality, the play reminds us that it takes a very long time to process the effect of terror.
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WORLD
August 27, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The type of limited, punitive military campaign now being contemplated against Syria has failed to deter U.S. adversaries in the past, and at times emboldened them, military analysts say. In two major episodes in 1998, the U.S. government unleashed a combination of bombs and cruise missiles against its foes - Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein's government in Iraq. In a more distant third case, in 1986, the U.S. bombed Moammar Kadafi's Libya. The bombs and missiles mostly hit their targets, and the U.S. military at the time declared the attacks successful.
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WORLD
May 21, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya — The Libyan intelligence officer convicted in the 1988 bombing of an American airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland, died at home here Sunday nearly three years after passions around the case were reawakened when he was freed on compassionate grounds because of what was reported as advanced prostate cancer. Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, 60, became a symbol of state-sponsored terrorism under the late Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi. Megrahi repeatedly denied a role in the downing of Pan Am Flight 103, which killed 270 people, including 189 Americans, and led to Libya's further isolation as a rogue state.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
In December 1988, the residents of a small Scottish town hosted unusual guests: dozens of corpses that lay for days in streets, fields and gardens until investigators could process them as forensic evidence. The dead were the victims of the Pan Am 103 bombing that claimed 259 passengers and crew, as well as 11 people on the ground. Deborah Brevroot wrote her tribute to “The Women of Lockerbie,” now onstage at Theatricum Botanicum, eight years before  9/11. Despite its sentimentality, the play reminds us that it takes a very long time to process the effect of terror.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | Josh Meyer
FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III has strongly condemned Scotland's justice minister for freeing the only man convicted in the Lockerbie bombing, saying in a letter released Saturday that his action had made a "mockery" of justice and encouraged terrorists everywhere. Mueller's letter came on the heels of criticism by President Obama and other administration officials over the decision Thursday to release former Libyan intelligence agent Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who was convicted in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, killing 270 people, most of them Americans.
WORLD
September 1, 2009 | Henry Chu
Amid continued allegations of political deal-making, Scottish officials said today that the early release of the only man convicted in the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Scotland was motivated solely by humanitarian and judicial concerns, not commercial ones. British interests in Libya's large oil and gas reserves were irrelevant to the decision to release Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, a suspected Libyan spy found guilty in 2001, said Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's deputy first minister.
WORLD
August 21, 2009 | Michael Muskal
Wearing a white track suit, and a scarf to cover his face, Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, a one-time intelligence officer, this morning left Greenock Prison in Scotland, where he had served eight years in connection with the 1988 bombing that destroyed an airliner over Lockerbie and killed 270 people. The release of the man, described as terminally ill with prostrate cancer, was the latest step in the Lockerbie saga that had shaped international relations for a generation and was seared into the American and British consciousness as an early example of state terrorism.
WORLD
August 14, 2009 | Janet Stobart, Stobart is in The Times' London Bureau.
The Scottish justice minister is considering the release from prison of a man serving a life sentence for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, which killed 270 people, because the man is terminally ill, according to media reports Thursday. Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill may allow Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who is suffering from terminal prostate cancer, to be released on compassionate grounds as early as next week, the reports by the British Broadcasting Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
The 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, has all but faded into the bloodless abstraction of a diplomatic bargaining chip in U.S.-Libyan relations. With "The Women of Lockerbie," the Actors' Gang recaptures the emotional weight of that watershed terrorist attack through the visceral immediacy of first-rate live performance.
WORLD
August 19, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A terminally ill Libyan man convicted in the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland, moved closer to being released from his Scottish prison when a court agreed that he could drop an appeal against his conviction. The Scottish ruling removed a legal hurdle that prevented Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi from being transferred to a prison in his homeland. His release is opposed by the relatives of many victims, who say Megrahi should stay behind bars for the attack that killed 270 people.
WORLD
May 21, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya — The Libyan intelligence officer convicted in the 1988 bombing of an American airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland, died at home here Sunday nearly three years after passions around the case were reawakened when he was freed on compassionate grounds because of what was reported as advanced prostate cancer. Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, 60, became a symbol of state-sponsored terrorism under the late Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi. Megrahi repeatedly denied a role in the downing of Pan Am Flight 103, which killed 270 people, including 189 Americans, and led to Libya's further isolation as a rogue state.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Last month, as pro-Kadafi forces staged a televised rally in the Libyan capital of Tripoli, Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who was convicted a decade ago in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, was seen sitting alongside Moammar Kadafi. Megrahi was released from prison two years ago by Scottish authorities, who believed he was in such poor health that he had just months to live. Now, as Kadafi's regime crumbles, Megrahi's Scottish parole officers say they will try to locate him, the Associated Press reports.
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
President Obama joined British Prime Minister David Cameron on Tuesday in condemning last year's release of the only person convicted in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, but both men stopped short of pledging a full inquiry into how the release unfolded and whether embattled BP executives had anything to do with it. Speaking to reporters after a morning of meetings at the White House, Cameron said that, despite reports...
WORLD
September 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Britain's Foreign Office took the unusual step of denying a newspaper report that diplomats had reached a secret agreement with Libya that would prevent the killer of a British policewoman from being tried in Britain. A spokesman who asked not to be identified because of departmental policy said there was no truth to the Sunday Times' claim that a secret deal reached three years ago meant the killer of policewoman Yvonne Fletcher would never face trial in Britain. The issue is sensitive because the British government's dealings with Libya have been under intense scrutiny since the release last month of Lockerbie bomber Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who is terminally ill with cancer.
WORLD
September 1, 2009 | Henry Chu
Amid continued allegations of political deal-making, Scottish officials said today that the early release of the only man convicted in the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Scotland was motivated solely by humanitarian and judicial concerns, not commercial ones. British interests in Libya's large oil and gas reserves were irrelevant to the decision to release Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, a suspected Libyan spy found guilty in 2001, said Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's deputy first minister.
WORLD
August 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Scotland's justice minister Monday defended his much-criticized decision to free the only man convicted in the Lockerbie bombing. The Scottish administration has faced unrelenting criticism from both the U.S. government and some of the families of American victims of the 1988 Pan Am bombing since it announced last week that it was freeing Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi on compassionate grounds. The terminally ill Megrahi, who has prostate cancer, returned to his native Libya on Thursday, where he was greeted by crowds waving Libyan and Scottish flags.
OPINION
August 21, 2009
The release by Scotland of Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, who was expected to spend his life in prison for the 1988 bombing of a Pan American jetliner, was merciful, certainly, but an outrage nonetheless. The "compassionate release" of the terminally ill Libyan terrorist showed no compassion for relatives of the 270 people killed when the jet exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland. Compounding their trauma was the muted protest of the Obama administration. Instead of viewing the special relationship between the United States and Britain as a cause for candor, the president, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Atty.
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