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WORLD
May 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The government has accepted responsibility for the 1988 Lockerbie, Scotland, airliner bombing and set up a fund that could total about $2.7 billion to compensate victims' families, Foreign Minister Mohammed Abderrahmane Chalgam said. The U.S. said the statement did not meet the requirements of U.N. Security Council resolutions, which require Libya to take responsibility, pay compensation and renounce terrorism. The bombing killed 270 people.
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WORLD
February 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
Libya contradicted its prime minister Wednesday and affirmed that it was responsible for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. The assertion by Prime Minister Shokri Ghanem that Libya had not acknowledged the attack that killed 270 people, including 189 Americans, put on hold U.S. plans to lift nearly three decades of restrictions on American travel to the country. Secretary of State Colin L.
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NEWS
February 20, 1989
Seventy-five to 100 relatives of people killed when a bomb exploded aboard an airliner attended a meeting in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J., to form the Victims of Pan Am Flight 103 committee. "We've come to assist each other in our grief," said Paul Hudson, an attorney and former counsel to the New York State Crime Victims Compensation Board who started the network. Hudson's daughter, Melina, was aboard when a terrorist's bomb on the plane blew up over Lockerbie, Scotland, Dec.
WORLD
August 19, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Britain submitted a draft resolution Monday to lift U.N. sanctions on Libya, discreetly pressuring France to not let its own dispute with Tripoli over compensation for airline bombing victims block a vote this week. "Our wish is to see an early vote," British Ambassador Emyr Jones Parry said as he left a meeting of the Security Council. "This has been a long, painful, protracted negotiation, especially for the families." The U.N.
NEWS
March 13, 1989
Four Scottish constables arrived in Boston to calm families who say they cannot put to rest loved ones killed by a terrorist bomb on Pan Am Flight 103 until the victims' personal belongings are returned to them. The senior police officers wanted to ease the pain and confusion felt by many families of the 259 victims whose possessions have been withheld during the investigation of the Dec. 21 plane explosion over Lockerbie, Scotland.
NEWS
April 3, 1989
A campaign to raise a $2.5 million reward for the capture of the terrorists responsible for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 will be launched today in Washington, a London newspaper reported. The Sunday Telegraph said that Bruce Smith, whose British wife, Ingrid, was one of 270 people who were killed when the Boeing 747 exploded Dec. 21 over Lockerbie, Scotland, will announce the campaign.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi discussed his Lockerbie impasse with the West on Saturday in talks with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak that are expected to last at least one more day, presidential sources said. Kadafi will hold a news conference at the end of his talks with Mubarak on Monday, Egyptian Information Minister Safwat Sharif said. The Libyan leader is due to leave Egypt on Friday. There was no further word about the progress of the talks. The U.N.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | Washington Post
Relatives of the victims of the Pan Am 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, have begun taking advantage of a change in federal law that allows them to sue Libya for its alleged role in the 1988 terrorist attack that killed 270 people. In Washington, lawyers for M. Victoria Cummock of Coral Gables, Fla., whose husband died in the attack, filed a $1-billion class action lawsuit against Libya, the two alleged bombers, Libyan Arab Airlines and the Libyan External Security Organization.
WORLD
August 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
The United States and Britain have reached an understanding with Libya under which Moammar Kadafi's government would renounce terrorism, accept responsibility for the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, and compensate families of the 270 victims, U.N. diplomats and an attorney said Tuesday. The diplomats, on condition of anonymity, said an agreement could be signed as early as today, paving the way for a U.N. Security Council resolution to lift sanctions against Libya.
WORLD
February 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
Libya contradicted its prime minister Wednesday and affirmed that it was responsible for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. The assertion by Prime Minister Shokri Ghanem that Libya had not acknowledged the attack that killed 270 people, including 189 Americans, put on hold U.S. plans to lift nearly three decades of restrictions on American travel to the country. Secretary of State Colin L.
WORLD
August 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Libyan government signed an agreement Wednesday setting up a $2.7-billion fund for families of the 270 victims of the 1988 Pan Am bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland -- a key step toward lifting U.N. sanctions against Tripoli, the families' lawyers said. The agreement setting up an escrow account at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, was reached after an 11-hour session in London, said an e-mail signed by attorneys James P. Kreindler and Steven R. Pounian.
WORLD
August 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
The United States and Britain have reached an understanding with Libya under which Moammar Kadafi's government would renounce terrorism, accept responsibility for the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, and compensate families of the 270 victims, U.N. diplomats and an attorney said Tuesday. The diplomats, on condition of anonymity, said an agreement could be signed as early as today, paving the way for a U.N. Security Council resolution to lift sanctions against Libya.
WORLD
May 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The government has accepted responsibility for the 1988 Lockerbie, Scotland, airliner bombing and set up a fund that could total about $2.7 billion to compensate victims' families, Foreign Minister Mohammed Abderrahmane Chalgam said. The U.S. said the statement did not meet the requirements of U.N. Security Council resolutions, which require Libya to take responsibility, pay compensation and renounce terrorism. The bombing killed 270 people.
WORLD
May 29, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a bold attempt to get off the U.S. terrorism list, Libya is offering $10 million in compensation for each victim of the 1988 midair bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, which killed 270 people, U.S. officials and lawyers for the families say. The Libyan offer to pay a total of $2.7 billion in compensation is also contingent on the lifting of sanctions that have been imposed against the North African nation by the United States and the United Nations, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Libyan cleared in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 flew home Thursday to a warm embrace from his leader, Col. Moammar Kadafi, while Scotland's top prosecutor ruled out the possibility of bringing further criminal charges in the case any time soon. Chief prosecutor Colin Boyd said that the Scottish court's decision Wednesday acquitting Lamen Khalifa Fhimah and convicting Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi of murder in the 1988 bombing made it clear that Megrahi did not act alone.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER and MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The long wait for justice was about to end, and the families of the victims of Pan Am Flight 103 braced themselves for the worst. Taking his seat in the courtroom, Bruce Smith said he was "pretty confident" there would be an acquittal of the two Libyans on trial for the murder of 270 people, including his wife, Ingrid. Nearby, Helen Engelhardt Hawkins worried that the judges would find reasonable doubt in the case against those accused of killing her husband, Anthony.
WORLD
August 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Libyan government signed an agreement Wednesday setting up a $2.7-billion fund for families of the 270 victims of the 1988 Pan Am bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland -- a key step toward lifting U.N. sanctions against Tripoli, the families' lawyers said. The agreement setting up an escrow account at the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, was reached after an 11-hour session in London, said an e-mail signed by attorneys James P. Kreindler and Steven R. Pounian.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Libya will not accept a 30-day deadline set by the United States and Britain to hand over two Libyans accused of blowing up a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, according to a Libyan statement released Saturday. State television, monitored in Tunisia, quoted an unidentified Foreign Ministry official as saying that "those who speak about giving a deadline do not want a fair trial" for the two suspects.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday heralded the conviction of a Libyan intelligence agent in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 as a "victory for an international effort" to bring terrorists to justice, and he pledged to isolate Libya until it compensates families for the attack and ends all support for terrorism. Yet after 12 years of participating in a tightly coordinated campaign with Britain and the United Nations, the United States is itself isolated in its effort to make the government of Col.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, a Libyan intelligence agent was convicted Wednesday of murdering 270 people in the blast, but his co-defendant was acquitted and quickly headed for home in Libya. The guilty verdict for Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, 48, was met with a collective gasp--and an emotional collapse--from victims' relatives and with stony silence from the Libyans' families in separate areas of the high-security court gallery.
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