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NEWS
November 19, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI and MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lockheed Martin Corp. delivered another blow to Southern California's battle-scarred defense industry by announcing Monday that it will close its Aeronutronics plant here, eliminating 750 jobs. The plant is among eight sites nationwide, including one in Glendale, that Lockheed will shut down as a final step in consolidating operations from its April purchase of Loral Corp. Altogether, 1,600 workers will lose their jobs. "I'm shocked," said an engineer at the Rancho Santa Margarita plant.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Unit's Export Rights Suspended: The State Department took the action against Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., citing previous charges of illegal payments to a member of the Egyptian Parliament. The subsidiary, based in Marietta, Ga., is part of Lockheed Corp.'s aeronautical systems group, which produces fighter-bombers and transport aircraft and systems for anti-submarine warfare and reconnaissance. The group had $6 billion in sales last year.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Unit's Export Rights Suspended: The State Department took the action against Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., citing previous charges of illegal payments to a member of the Egyptian Parliament. The subsidiary, based in Marietta, Ga., is part of Lockheed Corp.'s aeronautical systems group, which produces fighter-bombers and transport aircraft and systems for anti-submarine warfare and reconnaissance. The group had $6 billion in sales last year.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Software Contract: PDA Engineering, a maker of engineering software, said Monday that Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. in Marietta, Ga., has selected PDA's software system to help it develop a new jet fighter. PDA said Lockheed selected its M/Vision software after an extensive review and will use the materials-analysis software to analyze data from thousands of tests on parts materials for the Air Force's planned F-22 fighter.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
In a reorganization brought on by an approaching downturn in the military aircraft market, Lockheed said Thursday that it is consolidating its three aircraft companies into a single entity with headquarters in Burbank. Although the move has no immediate effect on Lockheed's 42,000 aircraft employees at facilities in seven states, the firm is hoping that "duplication" at its various plants can be eliminated and that employment can be reduced.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign that the local aircraft industry is slowing down, Lockheed Corp. said Friday it will lay off 2,750 salaried and hourly employees in its aircraft division, including 2,000 in Southern California. The company attributed the cuts at its Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., which were expected, to the shrinking defense budget and the completion of some major defense projects, such as the contract to build the F-117A Stealth fighter plane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and JAMES PELTZ, Times Staff Writers
The Department of Labor announced Friday that Lockheed Corp. has agreed to pay $1.49 million in penalties--the full amount proposed by the federal agency--for 440 violations of workplace safety rules. This is the highest fine to be paid by a company for health and safety violations in California and the second-largest fine paid by a company in the 19-year history of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Software Contract: PDA Engineering, a maker of engineering software, said Monday that Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. in Marietta, Ga., has selected PDA's software system to help it develop a new jet fighter. PDA said Lockheed selected its M/Vision software after an extensive review and will use the materials-analysis software to analyze data from thousands of tests on parts materials for the Air Force's planned F-22 fighter.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed will eliminate as many as 4,500 jobs from its Southern California operations over the next several years largely under a corporate reorganization in which several major military aircraft programs will be transferred to facilities in Marietta, Ga., the company announced Tuesday. Lockheed will move the headquarters of its Aeronautical Systems Co.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | JOHN MEDEARIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign that the local aircraft industry is slowing down, Lockheed Corp. said Friday it will lay off 2,750 salaried and hourly employees in its aircraft division, including 2,000 in Southern California. The company attributed the cuts at its Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., which were expected, to the shrinking defense budget and the completion of some major defense projects, such as the contract to build the F-117A Stealth fighter plane.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
U.S. safety officials on Friday cited Lockheed Corp.'s plant in Burbank for 440 alleged violations of safety and health-related record-keeping rules, and said the aerospace giant should be fined $1.5 million. The action by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration came after a four-month agency investigation of the plant. The investigation was prompted by workers' claims that dozens of Lockheed employees had become ill from exposure to hazardous substances at the plant.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed will eliminate as many as 4,500 jobs from its Southern California operations over the next several years largely under a corporate reorganization in which several major military aircraft programs will be transferred to facilities in Marietta, Ga., the company announced Tuesday. Lockheed will move the headquarters of its Aeronautical Systems Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and JAMES PELTZ, Times Staff Writers
The Department of Labor announced Friday that Lockheed Corp. has agreed to pay $1.49 million in penalties--the full amount proposed by the federal agency--for 440 violations of workplace safety rules. This is the highest fine to be paid by a company for health and safety violations in California and the second-largest fine paid by a company in the 19-year history of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
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