Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLockheed Corp
IN THE NEWS

Lockheed Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Lawrence O. Kitchen, the business-savvy ex-Marine who ran Lockheed Corp. in an era when the aerospace industry was dominated by scientists and engineers, died Sunday in Woodland Hills of neurological complications. He was 90. Kitchen is credited with turning around Lockheed's troubled operation in Georgia as a young executive, saving the C-5 Galaxy cargo jet program. Years later, he outmaneuvered competitors by persuading the Reagan administration to buy 100 more of the planes, a task that kept him personally lobbying Congress for a stretch of seven months.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Argentina Announces Lockheed Deal: Argentina on Sunday announced a $400-million contract with Calabasas-based defense contractor Lockheed Corp. to modernize a military-run aircraft facility and refurbish military jets. Lockheed will help rebuild 36 F-4 Phantoms sold to Argentina last year by the U.S. Navy. Lockheed officials said 18 of the fighters will be refurbished in California.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Marine Corps will deploy its first-ever cargo-lifting drone into a war zone when it sends the K-Max helicopter to Afghanistan next month. The heavy-lift drone chopper, made by Lockheed Martin Corp. and Kaman Aerospace Corp., recently wrapped up a five-day evaluation study in Arizona to prove its cargo-carrying capability in conditions similar to those it would be expected to encounter in Afghanistan. K-Max exceeded the Navy and Marines' requirement to deliver 6,000 pounds of cargo a day. "K-Max has the capability to quickly deliver cargo, thus getting troops off the roads and allowing them to focus on other missions," said Navy Rear Adm. Bill Shannon, division executive officer for unmanned aviation and strike weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1993 | ED BOND
The Burbank Airport Authority on Monday agreed to offer Lockheed Corp. $8.9 million for 15 acres needed to relocate several airport hangars. The commission approved the offer by a 6-0 vote, with three commissioners absent. "As of this afternoon, we have not received an offer on the property," said Paul Haney, a spokesman for the Lockheed Corp. office in Calabasas. "We will withhold any comment until we receive a definitive offer. We don't actually have an offer in hand."
BUSINESS
November 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Racism at Lockheed Alleged: A group of black Lockheed Corp. workers and former employees complained in Sunnyvale, Calif., of racism on the job, from spoken slurs to "KKK" scrawled on time cards. The allegations came three months after a jury awarded $925,000 to Norman Drake, a black engineer who complained of harassment. Tony Eckford, an engineer who said he was fired a month ago for wearing a "Stop Racism at Lockheed" T-shirt, organized a rally to protest the alleged racism.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1994 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took the biggest merger in the history of the aerospace industry to get Daniel M. Tellep to finally change companies after 39 years. The 62-year-old chief executive of Lockheed Corp. was officially named CEO of the new Lockheed Martin Corp. as part of the merger with Martin Marietta announced Tuesday.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The founder of MDB Systems Inc., an Orange-based maker of computer data security systems, said Monday that he has sold his controlling interest in the firm to Lockheed Corp. for an undisclosed amount. Amos R.L. Deacon Jr., who formed the Orange-based company in 1970, has resigned as chairman and director of the company's board. He said he hopes to either start another high-technology company or work as a consultant in the area of computer data security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Ida B. Kinney, a 104-year-old who was believed to be the oldest African American in the San Fernando Valley and who was a driving force for civil rights in the region, died Jan 1. Affectionately nicknamed "Mother" Kinney, she died of complications related to old age at the Lake View Terrace home of her caregiver, Christel Flynn. "She was living history," state Sen. Alex Padilla (D- Pacoima) told The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Racing to meet year-end tax deadlines, defense contract giant Lockheed Martin Corp. sold 9,117 acres of Riverside County wildlife habitat to California on Wednesday, with promises to clean up rocket-testing contamination at the site. The $25.5-million purchase was funded with $12 million in park bonds, $8 million in federal wildlife funds and $5.5 million in county developer fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Southern California aviation pioneer Glenn Luther Martin started his design career as a child -- snipping up his mother's bedsheets to build sails and kites. Whatever her reaction at the time, she became his biggest supporter as he designed and tested the nation's first twin-engine bomber and built a company that would become Lockheed Martin Corp. The Wright brothers' famous flight on Dec.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2001 | From Bloomberg News and Associated Press
Lockheed Martin Corp., the largest defense contractor, said second-quarter profit rose 29% as it cut costs, and the company raised earnings estimates for this year and next. Net income rose to $144 million, or 33 cents a share, from $112 million, or 29 cents, a year earlier, despite a 4% decline in sales to $5.96 billion that reflected weakness in a several units. The results exceeded the 29-cent average estimate of analysts polled by First Call.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2001 | PEGGY ANDERSEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boeing Co.'s Joint Strike Fighter X-32B on Sunday successfully made the transition from normal flight to a jetborne hover. Meanwhile, Lockheed Martin Corp., which is competing with Boeing for the JSF contract, announced that its X-35B had made two vertical takeoffs and landings, along with 35-second hovers. Boeing spokesman Chick Ramey demurred from comparing the programs directly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Martin Corp. made an about-face Friday, offering $5 million to about 300 Burbank residents instead of fighting them in court to settle claims they got sick from toxic chemicals the aerospace giant released into the air, soil and ground water during decades of defense manufacturing. The settlement offer, if accepted, could end four years of litigation in Los Angeles County Superior Court between the residents and Lockheed. Despite its offer, Lockheed is not admitting guilt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1988
The union representing about 8,000 workers at Lockheed Corp. plants in Burbank and Palmdale has announced that it is conducting an "expanded investigation" into allegations by its members that Lockheed's use of chemicals and composite materials has caused health problems among workers. "The union has been conducting investigations of worker complaints on a case-by-case basis," said Bryan Carver, president of the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Nearly a decade after Lockheed Martin pulled out of the city of Burbank, crews are demolishing the last vestiges of the sprawling defense facilities that churned out combat aircraft and spy planes for World War II and the Cold War. The wrecking ball is being put to structures on 32 acres adjacent to the Burbank Airport parking garage, once home to an aircraft factory and Lockheed corporate offices, said Burbank redevelopment director Robert M. Tague. Los Angeles-based Zelman Cos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rejecting one of the largest toxic pollution judgments ever rendered, a California appellate court Tuesday threw out $380 million in punitive damages against five oil and chemical companies accused of failing to warn hundreds of workers about health hazards at the Lockheed Skunk Works. The three-judge panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal ruled in Aguilar vs. Ashland Chemical Co. that there was no evidence of "despicable conduct" by Exxon, Unocal, Shell, Ashland and DuPont.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|