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June 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There were no reports of Legionnaire's disease among Lockheed Missile & Space Co. employees, but two buildings in Sunnyvale where the dreaded bacteria surfaced remain closed indefinitely, a spokesman said. Discovery of the Legionnaire's bacteria in humidifiers in two company labs forced the closure of both buildings on Friday. There was no estimate as to how soon they could be reopened, Lockheed spokesman Bob Burgess said.
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NEWS
June 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There were no reports of Legionnaire's disease among Lockheed Missile & Space Co. employees, but two buildings in Sunnyvale where the dreaded bacteria surfaced remain closed indefinitely, a spokesman said. Discovery of the Legionnaire's bacteria in humidifiers in two company labs forced the closure of both buildings on Friday. There was no estimate as to how soon they could be reopened, Lockheed spokesman Bob Burgess said.
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NEWS
January 25, 1992 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
L. Eugene Root, pioneer U.S. aircraft builder who led Lockheed Missile & Space Co. to maturity and was a charter member of the RAND think tank, has died. He was 81. Root died Thursday in a Menlo Park convalescent home after suffering a stroke. As president of the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences in 1962, Root combined his organization with the American Rocket Society, co-founding the major U.S. aerospace society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1991 | United Press International
The Navy has signed contracts worth nearly $1 billion for 52 Trident 2 missiles for its newest class of ballistic missile submarine. The contracts went to Hughes Aircraft Co. of El Segundo, Lockheed Missile and Space Co. of Sunnyvale, Calif., and Raytheon Co. of Sudbury, Mass. The eight-warhead missiles will be deployed on the 18 Ohio-class Trident submarines the Navy expects to have by the time the submarine program is completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1994 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With California already spinning from defense cuts, Gov. Pete Wilson announced Thursday that he will send a delegation of state officials and business leaders to Washington in two weeks to lobby for continued funding of the troubled space station. The station, a sophisticated orbiting laboratory already 10 years and $12 billion in the making, accounts for more than 4,200 California workers, about a third of them in Orange County.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed built the top-secret military satellites used during the Cold War to spy on the Khrunichev weapons factory in Moscow, but today Lockheed executives are busy cutting a commercial deal with the same Russian operation. The company's space systems division, the largest U.S. producer of space equipment, is preparing to announce a major joint venture with the Moscow factory that would mark a new thrust in its commercial business.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1987
In more than 20 years with Scotland Yard, John W. D. Elsworth achieved a very definite identity as an inspector and boxing champion. Now a registered securities dealer in Los Angeles, the transplanted Briton recently was dismayed at an identity problem that fate had brought him. A John C. Ellsworth (double l ) turned up in the news as a defendant in a securities fraud case filed by the state. Concerned clients of the single- l Elsworth started calling him to ask, "What's going on?"
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | DANA NICHOLS, Times Staff Writer
This city, home to half a dozen of the nation's largest defense contractors and hundreds of smaller companies that produce military equipment, is locked in acrimonious debate over whether to declare itself a nuclear-weapons-free zone. A proposal on Tuesday's ballot, known as Measure D, would ban all nuclear weapons work within the city and bar City Hall from investing in or doing business with any company that does nuclear weapons work.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and ERIC SLATER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move the government called a warning to disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to peddle U. S. defense secrets, a former Lockheed engineer was indicted Thursday on attempted espionage charges for allegedly trying to sell secret plans concerning the Sea Shadow, a Navy stealth project. John Douglas Charlton, 62, reportedly tried to sell plans concerning the ship and other projects to an FBI agent posing as an official from a Western European government, according to prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jack Lohrke, a major league infielder in the 1940s and '50s whose seeming ability to cheat death away from the baseball diamond earned him the nickname "Lucky," has died. He was 85. Lohrke died Wednesday at a San Jose hospital two days after having a stroke at his home, said his son John. Discovered as a teenager in the early 1940s on the semipro fields of Los Angeles, Lohrke spent seven seasons with the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies after serving in World War II.
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