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BUSINESS
December 10, 1993
Irvine Sensors Corp. said Thursday that it has won a contract to provide a Lockheed Corp. subsidiary with components for solid-state data recorders designed to replace tape recorders in satellites and other spacecraft. The agreement with Lockheed Sanders Inc. in Nashua, N.H., marks the Costa Mesa firm's first major contract for what it calls Memory Short Stacks, a super semiconductor that carries up to four memory microchips in the place of one.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hughes Aircraft Co.'s Ground Systems Group won a $61-million contract to build battlefield radars--an award that could protect up to 150 local defense jobs, the company announced Thursday. The U.S. Army contract could support employment for Hughes workers over the next year who might otherwise have faced layoffs, said company spokesman Dan Reeder. Follow-up work could eventually give Hughes more than $452 million in work, he said. "This will save jobs," Reeder said.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1992 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bendix Oceanics Inc. in Sylmar, a division of technology conglomerate Allied-Signal Inc., said it has scuttled expansion plans and may have to lay off workers after the U.S. Navy rejected a Bendix sonar system in favor of one made by a French company.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1992 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bendix Oceanics Inc., a division of technology conglomerate Allied-Signal Inc., said it has scuttled expansion plans and may have to lay off workers after the U.S. Navy rejected a Bendix sonar system in favor of one made by a French company. The Navy in December selected Thomson Sintra ASM, a unit of Paris-based Thomson-CSF, to develop its airborne low frequency sonar (ALFS), an advanced sonar system capable of detecting newer-generation submarines that are quieter than their predecessors.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rich Long has been lucky. So far. Over the years, he has seen hundreds of co-workers lose their jobs at Lockheed Sanders Inc., a defense contractor. Through the layoffs, through the early retirements, he has been a survivor. "Up until now," he said. "It doesn't look good for much longer. I'm walking a very thin line. . . . I'll be lucky to make it till the summer unless I can find another job in house." Long is not alone in treading that thin line.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aerospace industry in Southern California lost big when the Air Force on Tuesday decided to give the $14-billion development contract for the advanced tactical fighter to a team led by Lockheed Corp. The initial impact will be in the hundreds of jobs that will be eliminated by Los Angeles-based Northrop Corp., the Lockheed team's vanquished competitor.
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