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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1994
What do crime and health have in common? It is like locking the barn after the horse is stolen. Both spend billions on cures after the deed is done--but very few cents on prevention. CORINNE C. WICKS Downey
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
SAN FRANCISCO - As the Clippers were preparing for Game 4 of their first-round playoff series against the Golden State Warriors, they found themselves also having to deal with allegations that Clippers owner Donald Sterling made racist comments about African Americans. Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, who were the only Clippers players who spoke with the media after practice Saturday, both stuck with the theme that they were "focused" on playing Sunday and were only "here to talk about the Golden State Warriors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992
Our readers wrote letters throughout 1992, expressing their viewpoints on a variety of issues. Here are condensed versions of some of those letters to help us remember the events that mattered to Orange County readers this past year. We would like to thank the readers who took the time to share their views, and we look forward to hearing from them and others in 1992. Locking students out of classrooms as a cure for tardiness? How desperate, how uninspired, how adversarial and punitive.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
Here's a chance to lock in an airfare to Sydney, Australia, in the face of rising fuel costs, which often mean rising airfares: From LAX, Air New Zealand is offering a round-trip fare to Sydney, Australia, for $1,290, which includes all taxes and fees. In March, Sydney was the host of the opening of the Dodgers 2014 season. Two games versus the Arizona Diamondbacks were played at the Sydney Cricket Ground . It was the first time Major League Baseball has begun its schedule in Australia, but not the first time an American team has played there.
OPINION
April 17, 1988
I am writing in response to the article regarding the treatment of veal calves (Part I, April 6). Ever since the horrifying moment that I discovered how veal calves are raised, I have not eaten veal in personal protest to what I consider to be blatant and unnecessary desecration to animals. And in response to state Sen. H.L. Richardson's (R-Glendora) poor and offensive justification ("We're not locking a human being up, we're locking an animal up"), I say: The power of dominance over another living creature does not absolve cruel and abusive treatment of it. I'll stick with pasta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1994
Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas)--You just don't get it, do you! You criticize Janet Reno for caring "more about day care than about violent crime." How do you think criminals are made? And what do you think the answer to the crime problem is? Locking everyone up? Ms. Reno understands that we need to invest in the "people infrastructure" of our nation--our children--to reduce crime. Bravo to her! JUDY BOROSKIN Orange
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1995
Re "House Conferees Seek to Ban 'Indecent' Internet Material," Dec. 7: Big Brother now wants to regulate adult use of the Internet to protect children. Whatever happened to parental responsibility? There are disk-locking programs available which electronically lock the machine, disallowing boot-up without a password. There are also Net providers which allow access only to "family value" type material. It is my feeling that "we the people" should fight for a free Internet. CARL D. SASS El Toro
NEWS
October 25, 1992
In working with youth during the past 20 years, I have rarely encountered a troubled adolescent who didn't have even more troubled parents. Programs that specialize in such treatments as dragging teen-agers out of their homes, locking them in windowless basements and "behavior modifying" for months cannot demonstrate long-term success because they fail to address the root causes of youth problems. No parent should be able to commit a child to a locked treatment facility until a court-supervised assessment of the causes of the problems has been done.
OPINION
January 24, 2003
In his Jan. 20 commentary, Tom Wheeler does well to remind us that "You Can Look It Up, America." But where will we look? The paranoid, stupid fears of President Bush and his administration have instituted unheard-of levels of secrecy, refusal to share current records and locking up past presidential papers so that it will be difficult, if not impossible, to look up anything perpetuated by this president and administration. These guys make Hitler's crowd look like amateurs. Rodney Davis La Verne
TRAVEL
June 23, 1991
We have bicycled in the Sespe area for the last 10 years, so we particularly enjoyed Bob Sipchen's article in your June 2 Traveling in Style magazine. If the article inspires people to take their mountain bikes into the Sespe, they'd better go soon. A bill introduced in the House of Representatives would designate large portions of the Sespe, including the area mentioned in Sipchen's article, as National Wilderness. By definition, that excludes bicycles. Surely there's a way to preserve the area without locking out a significant, long-term user group.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2014 | By Josh Noel
One of the most tired cliches is that so-and-so doesn't actually sell such-and-such; they sell peace of mind. Well, in this case, it's true. The question is whether there is a market for that peace of mind among airline customers. In recent months, two companies - Chicago-based Options Away ( www.optionsaway.com ) and San Francisco-based Level Skies ( www.levelskies.com ) - have begun offering the chance to lock in airfares without committing to a ticket. This sort of service has been bubbling at the industry edges in various incarnations; Kayak ( www.kayak.com )
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It should be incredibly dull, just a man in his car on the phone. Yet the new British film "Locke" is gripping in its simplicity, wringing deep, suspenseful drama from a man making difficult decisions from which there will be no turning back. As he drives in his car while on the phone. Ivan Locke - played by Tom Hardy, the only character seen onscreen - is a construction site foreman who is preparing for the largest job of his career, as the next morning he is to oversee the pouring of a massive concrete foundation for a skyscraper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
CLIPPERS AT PORTLAND Where: Moda Center. When: 7:30. On the air: TV: ESPN, Prime Ticket; Radio: 980. Records: Clippers 56-24; Trail Blazers 53-28. Update: Portland is locked in as the fifth-seeded team in the Western Conference and will open the playoffs on the road against the Houston Rockets. The Trail Blazers have gone 8-1 since LaMarcus Aldridge returned from a back injury. They could rest several starters against the Clippers in a game that will not affect their playoff positioning.
SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Chris Foster
Most UCLA football fans would say, "Who?" when asked to point out Sam Handler . That doesn't mean they haven't noticed him. Handler, the walk-on receiver who had Fabio -like hair, was easy to spot. Those locks earned him the nickname "Sunshine. " He has been harder to pick out this spring. Handler shed the hair for charity this past Christmas, donating it to Locks of Love, a nonprofit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged people younger than 21 who had long-term hair loss because of medical treatments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Seven schools were placed on lockdown in Tustin on Thursday as police scoured the area for a gunman. Residents were warned to stay inside as police from Tustin and Irvine deployed a massive manhunt after an initial confrontation with the gunman in which police officers opened fire on the suspect near Red Hill Avenue and Nisson Road. "Our biggest concern is there are a lot of people living around here. We want everyone who is living here to stay in homes," Tustin Police Chief Charles Celano said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989
Los Angeles police and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration are investigating the death last Friday of an employee of a Wilmington cargo container storage yard who was killed when a 5,000-pound empty container fell on him. Nick Martin, president of Martin Container Service, said that Adrian Jacinto, 22, of Wilmington died after a locking device on the top of a container loosened and the container fell on him. Martin said...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A field of candidates - many political heavyweights and city insiders - are locked in an expensive battle to become Long Beach's newest mayor, a job that comes with expectations of reviving both the port city's economy and reputation. The April 8 election has candidates vying for city attorney and a majority of Long Beach's nine council seats, setting the stage for one of the most significant shake-ups in city politics in more than a decade. But all eyes are on the mayor's race, and with the crowded field a June runoff is likely.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Congress recognized 40 years ago that it was counterproductive and just plain wrong to incarcerate juveniles for trivial misbehavior such as truancy, breaking curfew, smoking or drinking. These acts, known as status offenses, are illegal only because the person committing them is a minor. Federal law passed at that time prohibited states from locking away most status offenders, but in 1980 the law was amended to allow incarceration when a court order had been violated. In other words, if a truant teenager was ordered by a court to attend school, and then cut class, incarceration was allowed.
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