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SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
Had the NHL season started last Thursday as scheduled, players would have received their first paychecks on Monday. Instead, the league-imposed lockout continued and the prospects of playing a full schedule grew smaller. Representatives of the league and the NHL Players' Assn. did agree to convene on Tuesday in Toronto, where a meeting is expected to take place involving the "Big Four" of NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly, NHLPA Executive Director Donald Fehr and NHLPA Special Counsel Steve Fehr.
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SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
Once, Kings defensemen Matt Greene and Rob Scuderi and Buffalo Sabres goaltender Ryan Miller were just like the young hockey players they skated with Thursday night in El Segundo. Well, maybe not Greene. “These guys are good. A lot better than we were,” Greene said while the Junior Kings peewee double-A2 team went through drills. “I don't know about Millsie. He was pretty good when he was younger.” Miller, who is married to actress Noureen DeWulf and spends his summers in California, and the two Kings made good use of their time during the lockout by going on the ice for about an hour to offer advice and hockey tips to kids on each of the three rinks.
SPORTS
October 11, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The NHL was scheduled to open its season Thursday night, but instead of previews, predictions and a peek at the Kings' plans for their Stanley Cup banner-raising ceremony Friday night at Staples Center, we bring you more lockout-related news. Isn't that fun! Of greatest interest to Kings fans is that backup goaltender Jonathan Bernier will join Heilbronn Falken of the German second division to stay active during the lockout, the Toronto Globe and Mail reported. That makes sense for him, considering he played so little last season.
SPORTS
October 10, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The Alberta Labour Relations Board dismissed an application by the NHL Players' Assn. to declare the league-imposed lockout illegal in that Canadian province and allow the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames to conduct training camp and other business as usual. The decision was issued Wednesday , on the eve of the NHL's scheduled but now-cancelled season openers. The league has cancelled games through Oct. 24 because of its dispute with players over a new collective bargaining agreement.
SPORTS
October 9, 2012
  Join us today at 11:30 a.m. when Times columnist and hockey Hall of Famer Helene Elliott and Times reporter Lisa Dillman will discuss the NHL lockout and all of its continuing implications in a live Google+ Hangout. Among the topics that could be covered: Does this mean the Kings will be Stanley Cup champions forever? How will this hurt the long-term popularity of the sport? The NHL has already canceled the first 14 days of the season. As Elliott wrote last week , "The Kings , who were scheduled to raise their Stanley Cup banner Oct. 12 at Staples Center , will lose six games, four of them at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Chris Barton
A late summer symphony of labor struggle in the arts that has seen lockouts involving orchestras in Indianapolis and Atlanta and a full-scale strike on the part of the Chicago Symphony Orchesta continues. The musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra failed to reach an agreement with management on a new contract by the midnight deadline Sunday and as a result, management has locked them out of their jobs. The orchestra has canceled performances through Nov. 25. In a storyline that's become all too grimly familiar, management rejected the Minnesota musicians' appeals for arbitration and allowing the orchestra to play as talks continue.
SPORTS
October 2, 2012 | By Matt Wilhalme
The loss of the NHL preseason because of the lockout has cost the league an estimated $100 million, but after talks between the NHL and NHL Players' Assn. ended Tuesday, NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said the league is closer to canceling some regular-season games too. “We are closer by definition" to canceling regular season games, Daly said. “We are focused on minimizing the damage.” With no solution yet, chances are the final price tag on the lockout could be much more, although Daly said the league has not project what that potential cost might be. There are no further talks scheduled, but the two sides can resume at any time.
SPORTS
September 30, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
For NFL officials . . . it's official. At a meeting Saturday morning in Irving, Texas, the officials voted overwhelmingly in favor of an eight-year agreement with the NFL, a deal struck three days earlier. Of the 117 votes, all but five were in favor of ratifying the contract, far more than the required 51%. "We were very happy, there were no major issues to come up," Scott Green, president of the NFL Referees Assn., told reporters after the half-hour meeting. "After a 115-day lockout, and having to watch football on TV, we were very enthusiastic about getting back to work.
OPINION
September 30, 2012 | By Robert Zaretsky
The National Football League referees are back on the field, replacing their replacements from the Lingerie League. But the lockout strategy lives on. A number of towns and institutions across the country - indeed, the globe - are using the NFL owners as their guide, convinced that the bottom line is the bottom line. Here is a selection of lockout dispatches from hither and yon. Replacement children On the eve of the new school year, the parents of Encino declared a lockout of their children.
OPINION
September 30, 2012 | By Rebecca Givan
It turns out that the professional referees in the NFL - the ones we used to love to hate but, after watching their replacements, now hate to love - are highly skilled officials, with years of experience and training. They couldn't be swapped for refs from high school conferences and the Lingerie League, not without messing up the game. Professionalism matters, and workers have specific skills that make them good at their jobs. It was the performance of the "amateur" refs that ultimately pushed the NFL owners (otherwise known as the billionaire's club)
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