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BUSINESS
January 17, 1985
The dual transactions were aimed at strengthening the long-distance telephone services that both Telesphere International Inc. and Marmon Telephone Network supply mostly to the lodging industry. Telesphere, based in Oak Brook, Ill., will pay Chicago-based Marmon Telephone Network, a unit of Marmon Group, $5.2 million for its long-distance network business and telephone switching facilities in Carson, Chicago, Atlanta and Stamford, Conn. Marmon will pay Telesphere $3.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 2009 | Hugo Martin
While hotels across the country continue to struggle with slumping occupancy rates and sliding revenue, industry data released Tuesday show signs of improvement in several regions, including Southern California. The hotel occupancy rate nationwide dropped 5.4 percentage points to 59.8% in the first week of October, compared with the same period last year, while revenue per available room fell 12% to $59.28, according to Smith Travel Research Global, an industry research firm. The numbers are the latest in a series of reports chronicling one of the worst slumps in decades for the hotel industry.
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TRAVEL
August 7, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
TERRORISTS have attacked planes, nightspots, trains and hotels. With the July 23 resort bombings at Sharm el Sheik, Egypt, lodging may be the latest front in the terrorists' war on travel. How safe are hotels from a terrorist attack? Not very, several security experts say, and they're not likely to get safer in the U.S. unless there's a major attack on lodging here -- a situation that seems chillingly reminiscent of the innocent days of U.S. commercial aviation before Sept. 11, 2001.
OPINION
April 10, 1994
Mike Davis' column ("Trying to Build a Union Movement in Los Angeles," Opinion, March 20) is a gross misrepresentation of the hotel industry and should offend all of the Los Angeles hospitality workers in general. The author suggests the entire hotel industry mistreats and exploits its employees. He is clearly wrong about the cleaning standards quoted in his article. As in all industries, there are unfortunate abuses of employees, including white-collar. However, Davis' liberal misuse and distortion of the hospitality industry are upsetting for those of us who genuinely care of our employees and work hard to keep them fully (and fairly)
BUSINESS
December 13, 1987 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
The Sheraton Hotel in Newport Beach serves free breakfasts. The Hyatt Regency in Garden Grove upgrades guests' flights to first class on some airlines. Yet despite the come-ons, there are plenty of empty rooms at the Sheraton, the Hyatt and the rest of Orange County's 351 hotels and motels. And that means room rates have remained low as all those hotels compete against each other, particularly along "Afterburner Alley," the group of hotels clustered around John Wayne Airport.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1985 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Quality Inns International, the nation's fastest-growing hotel chain, has checked in to Orange County with big plans to shake up the lodging industry. Last week, the Silver Spring, Md., company opened a Costa Mesa office, from where it will oversee nationwide development of its so-called "all suite" hotels. Company officials say these hotels signal a new direction for the Quality chain and for the hotel industry.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Investor Marvin Davis said Friday he has dropped his offer to buy Texas-based Spectradyne Inc., the nation's largest supplier of cable television and pay-per-view movies for hotels. In a short statement Friday, Spectradyne, which is based in Richardson, Tex., said it had been evaluating acquisition proposals from two unidentified parties and is continuing talks with one of them. Speculation on Wall Street centered on Washington-based Communications Satellite Corp. as a possible buyer.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1996 | Marla Dickerson
Guests are taking away more than a good night's sleep from many of the state's hotels, according to a survey just released by the California Lodging Industry Assn. Nearly 20% of the establishments surveyed are spending more than 5% of their annual budgets to replace stolen items or recoup losses due to theft. Towels remain the favorite parting gift for sticky-fingered lodgers, followed by soap and toiletries.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988 | Associated Press
A new market is emerging in the lodging industry as many traditional family reunions move from the back yard barbecue or grandma's porch to the nearest hotel. Homes and families are smaller, and no one has room to put up the relatives. Both husbands and wives work outside the home, so there's no time to plan for, much less cook for, a family reunion. Steven E. Trombetti, spokesman for the American Hotel & Motel Assn. in Washington, saw the trend emerging.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2004 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
I was taking notes for this story on a notepad from the Ritz-Carlton Millenia hotel in Singapore when the ink in my pen from the Sheraton on the Park in Sydney, Australia, went dry. I grabbed a pencil from the Hotel Buci Latin in Paris to complete the note and then picked up a cup of coffee from a pressed-paper coaster from the Hotel Hana Maui in Hawaii. Little reminders of these memorable trips help make my days in front of a computer a little more bearable.
TRAVEL
June 20, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Call it the ultimate guest comment card. If Americans collectively wrote one on the lodging industry, it would read like this: Basically, you're doing solid, consistent work. But you could do better. Improve the room lighting. Adjust the heat and air conditioning. Spruce up the decor. Charge less for phone calls. Be friendlier. Make us feel hip and cool. Offer more for the money. For tips on improving, take a meeting with Walt Disney Resorts or SpringHill Suites by Marriott.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1996 | Marla Dickerson
Guests are taking away more than a good night's sleep from many of the state's hotels, according to a survey just released by the California Lodging Industry Assn. Nearly 20% of the establishments surveyed are spending more than 5% of their annual budgets to replace stolen items or recoup losses due to theft. Towels remain the favorite parting gift for sticky-fingered lodgers, followed by soap and toiletries.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1996 | CAROL SMITH, Carol Smith is a freelance business writer based in Pasadena
Women who travel frequently on business may not make up the majority of business travelers, but in many ways they are driving changes in the hotel industry. Their smaller numbers belie the influence that female travelers have had on the hospitality industry.
OPINION
April 10, 1994
Mike Davis' column ("Trying to Build a Union Movement in Los Angeles," Opinion, March 20) is a gross misrepresentation of the hotel industry and should offend all of the Los Angeles hospitality workers in general. The author suggests the entire hotel industry mistreats and exploits its employees. He is clearly wrong about the cleaning standards quoted in his article. As in all industries, there are unfortunate abuses of employees, including white-collar. However, Davis' liberal misuse and distortion of the hospitality industry are upsetting for those of us who genuinely care of our employees and work hard to keep them fully (and fairly)
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988 | Associated Press
A new market is emerging in the lodging industry as many traditional family reunions move from the back yard barbecue or grandma's porch to the nearest hotel. Homes and families are smaller, and no one has room to put up the relatives. Both husbands and wives work outside the home, so there's no time to plan for, much less cook for, a family reunion. Steven E. Trombetti, spokesman for the American Hotel & Motel Assn. in Washington, saw the trend emerging.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2004 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
I was taking notes for this story on a notepad from the Ritz-Carlton Millenia hotel in Singapore when the ink in my pen from the Sheraton on the Park in Sydney, Australia, went dry. I grabbed a pencil from the Hotel Buci Latin in Paris to complete the note and then picked up a cup of coffee from a pressed-paper coaster from the Hotel Hana Maui in Hawaii. Little reminders of these memorable trips help make my days in front of a computer a little more bearable.
TRAVEL
June 20, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
Call it the ultimate guest comment card. If Americans collectively wrote one on the lodging industry, it would read like this: Basically, you're doing solid, consistent work. But you could do better. Improve the room lighting. Adjust the heat and air conditioning. Spruce up the decor. Charge less for phone calls. Be friendlier. Make us feel hip and cool. Offer more for the money. For tips on improving, take a meeting with Walt Disney Resorts or SpringHill Suites by Marriott.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1987 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
The Sheraton Hotel in Newport Beach serves free breakfasts. The Hyatt Regency in Garden Grove upgrades guests' flights to first class on some airlines. Yet despite the come-ons, there are plenty of empty rooms at the Sheraton, the Hyatt and the rest of Orange County's 351 hotels and motels. And that means room rates have remained low as all those hotels compete against each other, particularly along "Afterburner Alley," the group of hotels clustered around John Wayne Airport.
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