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Logical Step

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NEWS
June 13, 1993 | ELAINE GANLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Young Algerians frustrated by Muslim social restrictions and a housing crisis are advertising for love and mates, homeowners preferred. Some newspapers devote several pages to the plaints of the lovelorn and ads placed by men and women seeking marriage. For some, the only qualification is a place to live. "Single accountant, 26, seeks woman with lodging for marriage, 25-35," said a recent ad in Le Soir d'Algerie. In the effort to lure a mate, no resource goes unmentioned.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
The Hotel Normandie, a stoic brick building weighing down a corner of Normandie Avenue and 6th Street, opened in the Roaring '20s as an elegant residence, promising in tasteful advertisements to "leave nothing to be desired by the most experienced and exacting." Tuesday night, the hotel will host another grand opening, for a very different, experienced and exacting clientele: pot smokers. The aging Koreatown edifice has been rechristened Dennis Peron's Normandie Hotel, and the late-night event was timed for April 20, the annual day of celebration for cannabis worshippers worldwide.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1992
Cheers for Judge James Gray for having the bravery to suggest legalizing drugs. The "war on drugs" is indeed lost; it has brought us overflowing prisons, the enmity of our neighbors in Central and South America, inner cities that are armed guerrilla camps and little else. Legalization is certainly worth a try. We saw the light where prohibition of alcohol was concerned; it's time to take another logical step. KEATS HAYDEN Newport Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008
BEFORE the L.A. Philharmonic mothballs its tuxes and black dresses ["Bach? Kick Back," by Donna Perlmutter, May 1], someone should remind them that the whole point of concert formal wear is to present a uniform visual effect. The classical audience should be able to focus on the music, not what the bassoonist is wearing on his feet or why the cellist is wearing a pink polo shirt with orange pants. But that's an aesthetic detail. "Casual Fridays" is really based on one deeply objectionable premise -- that there's nothing particularly special about what we're doing here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993
I am appalled by your editorial (Aug. 29) calling for a counterfeit-proof ID card based on an individual's Social Security number. When I received my Social Security card, the card clearly stated "for Social Security purposes, not for identification." Today everyone from the IRS and DMV to the local electric and water company demands a Social Security number to file a tax return, obtain a driver's license or establish utility service. What is next, a requirement that all citizens are required to carry this ID card at all times?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1987 | BARBARA MILLER, Miller, a senior journalism major at Cal State Fullerton, is a Calendar intern.
It's the next logical step, according to Ron Bloomberg, supervising producer of NBC's "227." And it's a step he has wanted to take for six years. If all goes well, Bloomberg's vision to present a prime-time comedy series incorporating current events will be seen on "227" at 8:30 tonight--about 28 hours after the episode is taped. Usually, about a month elapses between the time a "227" is made and aired. If this sounds risky, that's because it is, Bloomberg said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008
BEFORE the L.A. Philharmonic mothballs its tuxes and black dresses ["Bach? Kick Back," by Donna Perlmutter, May 1], someone should remind them that the whole point of concert formal wear is to present a uniform visual effect. The classical audience should be able to focus on the music, not what the bassoonist is wearing on his feet or why the cellist is wearing a pink polo shirt with orange pants. But that's an aesthetic detail. "Casual Fridays" is really based on one deeply objectionable premise -- that there's nothing particularly special about what we're doing here.
OPINION
June 20, 2005
Re "Catholic School in O.C. Limits Gay Parents' Role," June 14: Though I am not a churchgoer, I do consider myself a Christian. I was appalled after reading the article about St. John the Baptist Church School in Costa Mesa. Two little innocent boys whose gay parents are not allowed to attend school functions. How can that parish be so mean-spirited? There is no way that they can call themselves Christian. Christians are taught to love their neighbors and to protect small children from hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2000
Thank you, Brian Lowry, for finally exposing TV's dirty little secret ("WB Covers a Trend Too Well," June 20). Adolescence is hard enough for teenage girls; I know that ours is certainly a challenge. It sometimes seems that the deck is stacked against parents when daytime and prime-time commercial TV is loaded with shows espousing the WB mentality of teenage sex as the norm. Using sexually mature adults to portray "normal" kids adds yet another dimension, because the teenager feels the need to look the part as well as act the part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Joel Brattain wasn't sure what he wanted to do when he graduated from Esperanza High School in Yorba Linda three years ago. College wasn't for him, his brother said. But he had an outdoors streak, and between delivering pizza and working at his mother's graphics company, he would head for the ski slopes and the beckoning wilderness. "He loved fishing. He was a very good snowboarder. He loved camping and hiking," said his 27-year-old brother, Kris. "He did everything full-bore or nothing."
OPINION
June 20, 2005
Re "Catholic School in O.C. Limits Gay Parents' Role," June 14: Though I am not a churchgoer, I do consider myself a Christian. I was appalled after reading the article about St. John the Baptist Church School in Costa Mesa. Two little innocent boys whose gay parents are not allowed to attend school functions. How can that parish be so mean-spirited? There is no way that they can call themselves Christian. Christians are taught to love their neighbors and to protect small children from hurt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Joel Brattain wasn't sure what he wanted to do when he graduated from Esperanza High School in Yorba Linda three years ago. College wasn't for him, his brother said. But he had an outdoors streak, and between delivering pizza and working at his mother's graphics company, he would head for the ski slopes and the beckoning wilderness. "He loved fishing. He was a very good snowboarder. He loved camping and hiking," said his 27-year-old brother, Kris. "He did everything full-bore or nothing."
NEWS
July 19, 2002 | CINDY CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica Beach early Wednesday is swarming with 50 pony-tailed girls of all shapes, sizes and ages. They await initiation rites: assault by foaming walls of water, endless trudging in heavy surf, repeated dunkings in cold saltwater. Their reward will be the sheer exhilaration of standing atop a powerful wave and riding it into shore. The girls--the youngest only 6, the oldest 16--are about to become surfers. They begin on the sand at 9 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, Josef Woodard is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Self-reliance has always ranked high in the collective ethos of Bang on a Can. In 1987, three composers in Manhattan--David Lang, Julia Wolfe and Michael Gordon--decided it would be fun to hold a marathon concert and otherwise champion new music. The marathons grew in acclaim, evolving into festivals, radio programs, commissioning programs, a "house band"--the Bang on a Can All-Stars--and more. A regular cottage industry.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2000
Drawing conclusions about the future of the e-book industry from the publishing experiments of Stephen King is like drawing conclusions about the judicial system on the basis of the O.J. Simpson trial: It is hardly what you would call a typical case ["E-Books: Much Ado About Nothing Much?" July 24]. E-books will not replace the printed book, any more than television replaced movies, but they allow for the manipulation and enhancement of the text in ways that are simply not possible with printed books.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2000
Thank you, Brian Lowry, for finally exposing TV's dirty little secret ("WB Covers a Trend Too Well," June 20). Adolescence is hard enough for teenage girls; I know that ours is certainly a challenge. It sometimes seems that the deck is stacked against parents when daytime and prime-time commercial TV is loaded with shows espousing the WB mentality of teenage sex as the norm. Using sexually mature adults to portray "normal" kids adds yet another dimension, because the teenager feels the need to look the part as well as act the part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
The Hotel Normandie, a stoic brick building weighing down a corner of Normandie Avenue and 6th Street, opened in the Roaring '20s as an elegant residence, promising in tasteful advertisements to "leave nothing to be desired by the most experienced and exacting." Tuesday night, the hotel will host another grand opening, for a very different, experienced and exacting clientele: pot smokers. The aging Koreatown edifice has been rechristened Dennis Peron's Normandie Hotel, and the late-night event was timed for April 20, the annual day of celebration for cannabis worshippers worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2000 | ANDY EDELSTEIN, NEWSDAY
So look what's generating the buzz on network TV these days: * Prime-time game shows: "Twenty One" returned Sunday, while new versions of "The $64,000 Question" and "To Tell the Truth" are being readied. * Wrestling. * Live drama: George Clooney's new version of "Fail-Safe," airing in April. * Fifteen-minute program: UPN is contemplating creating such shows. Holy time warp!
SPORTS
May 28, 1997 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the Belmont Stakes on June 7 is anything like the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, racing fans are going to be sorry to see the Triple Crown conclude. Perhaps it doesn't have to end in Elmont, N.Y. Hollywood Park could continue the show by boosting the worth of the Swaps Stakes on July 13. Doubling the purse from $500,000 to $1 million might do the trick.
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