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BUSINESS
June 13, 1989
Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Command in Burbank won a $3,764,556 contract from the Navy to provide logistics support.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Thinking about coming to the Festival of Books at USC this weekend? This year you can take the Metro, eat at food trucks and stay for a comedy show, all in addition to the oodles and oodles of book events. Here are some hints to help you organize your visit. And bring a jacket! This year the temperature is predicted to be on the cool side -- highs are expected to be in the mid-60s. The Festival of Books app . The app is free in the iTunes store. It includes a complete schedule of appearances, from which you can build your own must-see list.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1993
To develop an in-depth understanding of what caused blood to be shed in Waco, we should turn the focus from the logistics of those remaining to the question of why they went in there in the first place. LAWRENCE R. GORDON Santa Monica
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Syrian forces have overrun a strategic rebel stronghold close to the Lebanese border, the military said Sunday, in the latest battlefield victory for the government of President Bashar Assad. The official news service reported that Syrian troops were in "full control" of Yabroud, a longtime rebel bastion and key logistics base for opposition supplies and insurgents entering Syria from Lebanese territory. Aiding Syrian troops in the battle were militiamen from Hezbollah, the Lebanese group that has dispatched units to fight alongside Assad's forces.
WORLD
May 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The World Food Program said one of its workers was shot and killed by unidentified gunmen in northwestern Kenya. Silence Chirara is the first WFP worker killed in the town of Lokichoggio. Chirara was the agency's logistics coordinator for southern Sudan. Lokichoggio is a hub for agencies working in the region.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
L ogistics, the art of bringing socks and TVs and carrots from where they're made to a store near you, is a trillion-dollar industry in the U.S., and continuing to grow. The industry grew 10% in the middle of a deep recession, according to a report last year , and helps companies such as Wal-Mart, Target and Amazon get goods to you in increasingly cheap ways. But the logistics industry may also be driving down standards of living, according to a report out today by Jason Rowe of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, in partnership with New Labor, a workers rights group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
I appreciated your Feb. 21 "Protocol Chiefs Put City's Best Foot Forward" article, for as director of the Institute on World Affairs at San Diego State University, I deal with numerous ambassadors and other diplomats each year when we host dinners in their honor and have them address the institute on international relations. In dealing with these diplomats, and the multitude of protocol issues, logistics and community connections, I know most assuredly how vital it is for San Diego to have a professional Office of Protocol.
OPINION
February 8, 2002
Re "Greenest Games Ever? Not!" Opinion, Feb. 3: I remember how much fun it was working at the 1960 Squaw Valley Olympics before things got out of hand. Here is my plan to save the Olympic Games. Both the Summer and Winter Games would be divided into three categories and staged consecutively at three different host countries. This would improve logistics, security and manageability, shift the focus back to the athletes and bring back the Olympic spirit. The three categories would be: 1. Sports: volleyball, tennis, hockey, baseball, etc. 2. Competition: track & field, races, weightlifting, etc. 3. Performance: diving, gymnastics, ice skating, anything decided by judges or involving horses, guns or kayaks.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
An Australian real estate giant is joining forces with Irvine-based Birtcher Development & Investments as part of a $1.5-billion expansion into North America. Goodman Group, Australia's biggest industrial real estate investment trust, said Wednesday that with Birtcher it will develop more than $700 million worth of industrial properties at four locations in the United States. Two of the sites are in the Inland Empire, another is in Oakland and the fourth is near Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997
Charles J. Breitwieser, 86, engineer and inventor who improved medical equipment, aircraft and elevators. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Breitwieser grew up in Grand Forks, N.D., and earned engineering degrees from the University of North Dakota and Caltech. As head of research and development for De Forest Laboratories & Engineering, he developed an artificial fever machine, the high-frequency cordless surgical knife and several advances in radiation and X-ray technology. In aerospace, he invented advanced guidance systems for long-range missiles and the radio altimeter for aircraft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson and Matt Stevens
What one Los Angeles International Airport official called a “logistical nightmare” played out Saturday afternoon inside Terminal 3 as passengers who had fled in the midst of Friday's shooting rampage returned to search for their belongings -- resulting in long lines and hot tempers. Gina Marie Lindsey, executive director of Los Angeles World Airports, announced at a press conference Saturday afternoon that LAX was "returning to normal" and Terminal 3 is fully operational. But she also acknowledged that operations were "very, very busy.” "We greatly appreciate the public's patience because of this," she said.  In the wake of the shooting that killed a Transportation Security Administration officer and left several others injured, people who had lost their bags and personal effects in the chaos were essentially sent on a scavenger hunt for their belongings.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - About sundown one Sunday in September, North Dakota farmer Steven Jensen noticed that his combine was running over wet, squishy earth in a wheat field he was harvesting. When he took a closer look, he saw that oil had coated the wheels and that it was bubbling up about 6 inches high in spots. That was Sept. 29; Jensen contacted authorities immediately. At least 20,600 barrels of oil leaked onto the Jensens' land from a pipeline owned by Tesoro Logistics, one of the largest land-based spills in recent history.
WORLD
October 8, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - A second wave of chemical weapons inspectors is heading to war-battered Syria this week as the international effort to disarm President Bashar Assad's poison gas program races to meet its United Nations-ordered deadlines, officials said Tuesday. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the lead technical agency in the operation, said additional experts will reinforce the 19 inspectors and 16 U.N. logistics and security personnel who started work in Damascus last week on a plan to dismantle, destroy or impound Syria's toxic stockpiles.
WORLD
June 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Christi Parsons and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Delivering weapons and ammunition to beleaguered Syrian rebels will take weeks, White House officials acknowledged Friday as the administration's decision to supply arms set off a debate about how far, and how fast, President Obama's plunge into the conflict will take him. The move, after months of hesitation, has been widely viewed as a possible turning point toward far greater U.S. involvement in the 2-year-old civil war. But the...
WORLD
May 5, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
RIO DE JANEIRO - After 2 1/2 years of renovations, Rio's legendary Maracana soccer stadium reopened to much fanfare in late April. Brazilian legends including Ronaldo played in a test match before an audience composed mostly of the workers who rebuilt the 78,000-capacity temple to futebol that will be the flagship venue for next year's World Cup. The launch was deemed a success - and allowed officials to breathe a sigh of relief before they...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013
Coachella returns for its second act this weekend. Here, The Times pop music staff offers some lessons learned in the first weekend that will make the festival sound that much better the second time around. Grab lunch at Roc's Firehouse Grill. You can sit down, be waited on and there's air conditioning. If you're catching Passion Pit, walk to Local Natives right after. Don't miss Jurassic 5. Get to Major Lazer early, because the crowd overflowed the Mojave tent Saturday. Try not to get burned out by the back-to-back Brit pop Sunday, but Jessie Ware and La Roux are essential.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006
SORRY, but in this day of plastic and soulless heroes, Kenneth Turan is not going to take away one of our last movie heroes ["Punch Drunk and Down for the Count," Dec. 20]. I'm sure this film is probably intended to play out to a certain demographic, of which I'm included, but there are lots of us out here who actually place values in front of mere spectacle. "Rocky Balboa" effectively and entertainingly addresses the generation gap between young and old, father and son, old school and new. It's pointless to allow real-world logistics to stand in the way of a chance to revisit a very real hero in the minds of those of us who believe.
OPINION
November 20, 2006
Re "Vernon mayor and ex-official are indicted," Nov. 16 The charges against current and former Vernon city officials are a concern to Vernon business and property owners. Vernon is not like any other city. Our thriving industries, including food and agriculture, apparel, recycling, steel, plastics, logistics and cold storage, are an important economic driver of the Southern California economy. The city has a highly responsive, streamlined and business-friendly city government. While the Vernon Chamber of Commerce supports the city's exclusively industrial mission and its employees, we are vehemently against corruption and the squandering of our tax dollars.
OPINION
March 27, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Soldier, Megan P. Tatu has your back. And just about anything else you might need. The two-star Army Reserve general has just taken charge of the 79th Sustainment Support Command, the modern iteration of an Army logistics branch that is a year older than the Declaration of Independence. The 79th is headquartered in Los Alamitos, not far from Tatu's Laguna Niguel home. Reservists are part-timers who, as Tatu says, give taxpayers 19% of the Army's strength for 4% of its budget. She's the highest-ranking woman commander in the reserves on the West Coast, at a moment when women in the military is a trending topic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Americans just love feeling philanthropic. In any debate over cutting tax breaks in the income tax system, the deduction for charitable donations is always held sacred - even more than that other sacred cow, the mortgage deduction. It's a rare political leader who doesn't bow to the role played by charitable foundations in filling gaps left by government services to the indigent, the sick and the elderly, here in the United States and around the globe. The globe-trotting, tent-dwelling relief worker, the doctor without borders, the logistics expert getting food and medicine to camps of war refugees - all elicit unique reverence from us armchair empathizers in civilized lands.
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