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Loida Lewis

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BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Loida Lewis, a lawyer who assumed control of the nation's largest black-owned business a year after husband-founder Reginald Lewis died, is the most powerful female CEO in America, according to Working Woman. The magazine's May issue, distributed Monday, ranks her No. 1 in its fourth annual list of the Top 50 female business owners. TLC Beatrice's annual revenue totaled $1.82 billion in 1994, the biggest of any female-run company.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Loida Lewis, a lawyer who assumed control of the nation's largest black-owned business a year after husband-founder Reginald Lewis died, is the most powerful female CEO in America, according to Working Woman. The magazine's May issue, distributed Monday, ranks her No. 1 in its fourth annual list of the Top 50 female business owners. TLC Beatrice's annual revenue totaled $1.82 billion in 1994, the biggest of any female-run company.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
TLC Beatrice Plans Cost Cutting: The nation's largest black-owned business has halved its New York headquarters staff and sold the corporate jet. The food conglomerate also announced that minority shareholders have abandoned their efforts for a common stock offering of the privately owned company and are satisfied that management is now ensuring Beatrice's health. It was the first public disclosure of the steps undertaken by management since Loida Lewis, widow of founder Reginald F.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
TLC Beatrice Plans Cost Cutting: The nation's largest black-owned business has halved its New York headquarters staff and sold the corporate jet. The food conglomerate also announced that minority shareholders have abandoned their efforts for a common stock offering of the privately owned company and are satisfied that management is now ensuring Beatrice's health. It was the first public disclosure of the steps undertaken by management since Loida Lewis, widow of founder Reginald F.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
This year's Working Woman magazine list of the top 50 female business owners includes five women who run billion-dollar companies, with Martha Ingram, chairwoman of Ingram Industries, leading the pack. Ingram, who was public relations director of the Nashville, Tenn.-based conglomerate, took over its helm after the death last June of her husband, industrialist E. Bronson Ingram.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mattel on Thursday picked a woman to run the house that Barbie built, making Jill E. Barad chief executive of the $3.6-billion toy manufacturer, arguably the most powerful businesswoman in the nation. When the 45-year-old Barad takes over Jan. 1 from 64-year-old John W. Amerman, she will top the very short list of women who head Fortune 1000 companies. That sorority numbers only four.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
TLC Beatrice International Holdings Inc., once the nation's largest black-owned company, is being liquidated as part of an evolving strategy begun after the death of its founder, Reginald Lewis, in 1993. The liquidation plan, announced Thursday along with the sale of its Spanish soft drink division, is expected to return a healthy profit for investors and the Lewis family, the company said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1993 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reginald F. Lewis, the Harvard-educated lawyer who gained fame during the 1980s takeover craze and built the nation's largest black-owned business, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Tuesday after a short battle with brain cancer. The quick decline of the chairman and chief executive of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, who turned 50 last month, came as a shock to Lewis' friends and colleagues.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Democratic National Committee announced Friday that it will return an additional $1.5 million in questionable or improper donations, doubling to nearly $3 million the campaign money given back so far. More than half of the refunded contributions were solicited by John Huang, the former Democratic fund-raiser from Glendale, Calif., who specialized in the Asian American community and is now at the center of the growing campaign finance controversy.
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