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Loihi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | LISA MARINELLI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Just off the beaches of the island of Hawaii, a new island is slowly forming from a volcano 3,000 feet below the ocean's surface. Researchers using a three-person diving craft are monitoring the volcano, named Loihi--Hawaiian for "Long One"--about 20 miles off the southern tip of the largest and southernmost island in the Hawaiian chain. "It's an adrenaline-charged trip," said Alexander Malahoff, director of the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. "You have to be extremely cautious and careful."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | LISA MARINELLI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Just off the beaches of the island of Hawaii, a new island is slowly forming from a volcano 3,000 feet below the ocean's surface. Researchers using a three-person diving craft are monitoring the volcano, named Loihi--Hawaiian for "Long One"--about 20 miles off the southern tip of the largest and southernmost island in the Hawaiian chain. "It's an adrenaline-charged trip," said Alexander Malahoff, director of the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. "You have to be extremely cautious and careful."
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NEWS
July 27, 1996 | Associated Press
A swarm of strong earthquakes indicates that the underwater volcano Loihi might be erupting, scientists say. Seismographs at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have recorded more than 1,500 tremors on the volcano during the past week. While the tremors could mean Loihi is erupting, seismologist Paul Okubo and other scientists said it also could indicate a large movement of the flank of the volcano caused by a shifting fault zone.
NEWS
June 26, 1989
A large underwater earthquake shook Hawaii Island, collapsing one house at Kalapana, causing landslides north of Hilo and generating a small tidal wave, according to authorities and residents. No injuries were reported from the quake, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said. The earthquake, with a magnitude of 6.5, was centered eight miles off the island's southeastern coast, near an underwater volcano named Loihi, said Bruce Turner, a geophysicist at the warning center in Honolulu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1987 | JAMES C. BORG, James C. Borg is a science writer at the Honolulu Advertiser and studied at MIT as a Bush Fellow in 1986-87.
'The slow constant seepage of molten rock was not violently dramatic. Layer upon layer of the earth's vital core would creep out, hiss horribly at the cold sea water, then slide down the sides of the little mountains that were forming.' James A. Michener, "Hawaii" Off the Hawaiian Islands, scientists are getting one of their closest views yet of the earth 3.5 billion years ago, a time when volcanoes dominated the planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists plan to install a $4-million observatory on an underwater volcano, complete with cameras, microphones and seismometers to monitor the gradual birth of the next Hawaiian island. University of Hawaii researchers hope the Hawaiian Undersea Geo-Observatory will be in place on Loihi seamount within two years, using its instruments to study earthquakes and eruptions, geology and geophysics professor Fred K. Duennebier said last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is probably the most violent volcanic eruption recorded in the Hawaiian island chain in modern times occurred during the summer, but almost wholly out of sight. The eruption at the Loihi Seamount, like the 1980 eruption at Mt. St. Helens in Washington state, stripped more than 1,000 feet off the top of a towering mountain. But it could not be seen because the mountain was far below the ocean's surface.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
An undersea volcano off the coast of Samoa recently started erupting and is billowing "smoggy" water for several miles, scientists reported Tuesday. The volcano, Vailuluiu, is 28 miles east of Taiu Island, on the eastern side of Samoa. It rises 16,400 feet from the ocean bottom and reaches to within 2,000 feet of the surface. Scientists at the Scripps and Woods Hole institutes of oceanography suspected the volcano might be active after a swarm of earthquakes was reported at the volcano in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"The Infinite Voyage," which appears to be the most costly and solemn science series since "Cosmos," is a three-year-long celebration, airing quarterly, of scientific discovery and exploration. Funded by Digital Equipment Corp., it is appearing on both PBS and commercial television. The second program, "To the Edge of the Earth," airs tonight on PBS (8 p.m. on Channels 28, 15 and 24, 9 p.m. on Channel 50) and Monday night on KTTV Channel 11.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it's not enough these days to have a Hawaiian volcano consuming communities, a Washington state volcano ominously shuddering and belching and a massive Alaskan volcano rumbling from the deep, scientists now have discovered a string of eight or so brand-new baby volcanoes off the coast of Oregon. In the inky waters almost 300 miles offshore and 1.5 miles underwater, a crack in the Earth's surface has brought forth fresh eruptions sometime within the last decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Essoyan is a free-lance writer based in Honolulu. and
Fiery tongues of lava from Kilauea Volcano have ravaged this coastal community. But compared to some of its cousins around the world, the Hawaiian volcano is downright polite. "At least it gives you time. It lets you take what you want, and you can watch it," said Leslie Doctor, who stood mesmerized as the searing lava bore down on his family's home.
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