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Lois Lee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991
Regarding "War of the Charities" on Aug. 11, I do not know much about Thursday's Child and I do know personally of Dr. Lee and her work with Children of the Night. A friend of mine was saved from her pimp and street life by Lois Lee and given a new start in life. I praise the work Dr. Lee has done with Children of the Night. If there were something like it when I was on the street I might have had an easier life 18 years ago. We need more people like Dr. Lee to help these lost children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, Lois Lee is carefully explaining in an interview at her new $2-million shelter for teen-age prostitutes, she did not choose to open the shelter in the San Fernando Valley because she thinks that it is a snake pit of child prostitution and predatory pimps. The Valley was chosen as the site of the Children of the Night shelter because the business of teen-age prostitution has changed, requiring Lee's organization to change as well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two nonprofit organizations dedicated to helping teen-age runaways are accusing each other of uncharitable behavior in a bizarre feud that includes allegations of threats, beatings and dirty tricks. The feud pits Van Nuys-based Children of the Night and its renowned executive director, Lois Lee, the subject of a "60 Minutes" profile and a television movie, against a one-man teen rescue organization in West Hills called Thursday's Child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1991
John Johnson's article on the lawsuits between Children of the Night and Don Austin falls into the common trap of making something appear to be something else by naming it so. More than 12 years ago, Lois Lee formed Children of the Night to help the child prostitutes she had become aware of through her research for her doctoral degree. She built an organization and is about to open a 24-bed shelter. Her commitment and energy have allowed her to raise funds for this vital work solely through private donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1991
John Johnson's article on the lawsuits between Children of the Night and Don Austin falls into the common trap of making something appear to be something else by naming it so. More than 12 years ago, Lois Lee formed Children of the Night to help the child prostitutes she had become aware of through her research for her doctoral degree. She built an organization and is about to open a 24-bed shelter. Her commitment and energy have allowed her to raise funds for this vital work solely through private donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, Lois Lee is carefully explaining in an interview at her new $2-million shelter for teen-age prostitutes, she did not choose to open the shelter in the San Fernando Valley because she thinks that it is a snake pit of child prostitution and predatory pimps. The Valley was chosen as the site of the Children of the Night shelter because the business of teen-age prostitution has changed, requiring Lee's organization to change as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992
Children of the Night, the nationally known organization devoted to rescuing teen-age prostitutes, opened the doors of its new $2-million Van Nuys shelter Thursday in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for community leaders. The shelter, which will house up to 24 clients each night, is in a historic building that once housed the Van Nuys post office on Sylvan Street. Prostitutes admitted to the shelter will be permitted to stay 60 days while they train to re-enter society, getting jobs and apartments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1993 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Yoko Ono has offered a $10,000 matching grant to an organization that runs a Van Nuys shelter for sexually abused children, a spokesman said Thursday. Lois Lee, founder and executive director of Children of the Night, said Ono, the widow of John Lennon, has been a longtime supporter of the 14-year-old organization dedicated to helping troubled youth. "She's been a regular contributor," Lee said. "But she usually doesn't lend her name out, so this is nice."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen-year-old Cindy thought she had ditched her problems when she fled Oklahoma for Los Angeles. Instead, she acquired a battered suitcase full of new ones. Once she arrived, the teen said, she found herself having to work as a prostitute to make money for food and drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991
Regarding "War of the Charities" on Aug. 11, I do not know much about Thursday's Child and I do know personally of Dr. Lee and her work with Children of the Night. A friend of mine was saved from her pimp and street life by Lois Lee and given a new start in life. I praise the work Dr. Lee has done with Children of the Night. If there were something like it when I was on the street I might have had an easier life 18 years ago. We need more people like Dr. Lee to help these lost children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two nonprofit organizations dedicated to helping teen-age runaways are accusing each other of uncharitable behavior in a bizarre feud that includes allegations of threats, beatings and dirty tricks. The feud pits Van Nuys-based Children of the Night and its renowned executive director, Lois Lee, the subject of a "60 Minutes" profile and a television movie, against a one-man teen rescue organization in West Hills called Thursday's Child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Convictions in two slum housing cases became a boon to a homeless shelter for runaway youngsters Monday when City Atty. James Hahn delivered checks worth $7,500 to the Van Nuys-based Children of the Night facility. The two checks, one for $6,500 and another for $1,000, came from building owners who pleaded no contest to code violations. The shelter's executive director, Lois Lee, believes the punishment was fitting.
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