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Lois Lowry

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February 16, 1986 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
Sibling warfare is a beaten theme in contemporary children's literature, but Lois Lowry has such a fresh swing to her writing, this sequel to "The One Hundredth Thing About Caroline" is anything but pulp. Carolyn Tate and her genius brother J. P. are still at each other's throats, but suddenly they've called a truce. To their mutual disgust, their absentee father wants them to spend the summer with him and his new family in Des Moines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Son A Novel Lois Lowry Houghton Mifflin: 393 pp., $17.99, ages 12 and up It's been 19 years since the publication of Lois Lowry's pioneering Newbery Medal winner, "The Giver," which painted a bleak picture of a future society in which color does not exist, love is suppressed and sameness is revered. No one would have guessed that almost two decades later, "dystopian" would be its own genre in the young adult biblioscape, giving rise to blockbuster franchises such as "The Hunger Games," "Divergent," "Matched" and now, a follow-up from the author who's credited with starting it. "Son" is the Rashomon-style conclusion to "The Giver," told from the perspective of the young birth mother whose infant was saved in the original book.
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NEWS
November 9, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a recent dinner party, Lois Lowry was asked the question for the thousandth time. Now that you've had so much success as a writer for young people, Lowry's inquisitor wondered, why not write a real book? "Tell me," Lowry replied. "Would you ask a pediatrician why she didn't become a real doctor?" Lowry knows full well that the implication of the exchange is that "it is somehow a lesser art, writing for children."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In 1993, Lois Lowry published "The Giver," a young adult novel about a dystopian culture in which conformity is the standard and Sameness is a social goal. By then, Lowry was already a well-known writer for young readers: Her first book, "A Summer to Die," came out in 1977, and her novel "Number the Stars," which takes place during the Holocaust, won a 1990 Newbery Medal. Still, with its cautionary sensibility, its insistence on thinking for oneself, "The Giver" became a literary lightning rod. Winner of a 1994 Newbery, the novel has been equally assigned and challenged and is the defining book of Lowry's career.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
This season, in the land of children's books, there be giants and dragons, wimps and blue horses. First, about the giants. They're not imaginary ones. In fact, they're quite familiar. Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein. New books from both classic authors are coming this month - Seuss' "The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories" (Random House) and Silverstein's "Everything on It: Poems and Drawings" (HarperCollins). "New" isn't exactly the correct word to use - "Bippolo Seed" gathers together stories that Seuss, who died in 1991, published in magazines in the 1950s; while Silverstein, who died in 1999, left behind numerous drawings and poems that make up the content of "Everything on It. " The books, aimed at ages 6 and up (Seuss)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In 1993, Lois Lowry published "The Giver," a young adult novel about a dystopian culture in which conformity is the standard and Sameness is a social goal. By then, Lowry was already a well-known writer for young readers: Her first book, "A Summer to Die," came out in 1977, and her novel "Number the Stars," which takes place during the Holocaust, won a 1990 Newbery Medal. Still, with its cautionary sensibility, its insistence on thinking for oneself, "The Giver" became a literary lightning rod. Winner of a 1994 Newbery, the novel has been equally assigned and challenged and is the defining book of Lowry's career.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Son A Novel Lois Lowry Houghton Mifflin: 393 pp., $17.99, ages 12 and up It's been 19 years since the publication of Lois Lowry's pioneering Newbery Medal winner, "The Giver," which painted a bleak picture of a future society in which color does not exist, love is suppressed and sameness is revered. No one would have guessed that almost two decades later, "dystopian" would be its own genre in the young adult biblioscape, giving rise to blockbuster franchises such as "The Hunger Games," "Divergent," "Matched" and now, a follow-up from the author who's credited with starting it. "Son" is the Rashomon-style conclusion to "The Giver," told from the perspective of the young birth mother whose infant was saved in the original book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1999
The critically acclaimed "Anastasia Krupnik," starring Brenda Grate in the title role, concludes its run this weekend at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. This adaptation of Lois Lowry's book, written and directed by Meryl Friedman, is the first offering of the Falcon's Children's Theater series. * "Anastasia Krupnik," Saturday at noon, Sunday at noon and 2 p.m., Falcon Theatre, 4252 Riverside Drive, Burbank. Ends Sunday. (818) 955-8101. $8.50.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
The film company of Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz has agreed to work on five movies, including four based on award-winning children's books, in a deal with 20th Century Fox. Walden Media of the Anschutz Film Group would produce and develop the films with Fox, while Fox would distribute them. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | Associated Press
Author Lois Lowry has won the prestigious John Newbery Medal for children's books, while illustrator Ed Young was awarded the Randolph Caldecott Medal. The awards were announced Monday at an American Library Assn. meeting. Lowry, author of "Number the Stars," won the 1990 Newbery Medal for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children published in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
This season, in the land of children's books, there be giants and dragons, wimps and blue horses. First, about the giants. They're not imaginary ones. In fact, they're quite familiar. Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein. New books from both classic authors are coming this month - Seuss' "The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories" (Random House) and Silverstein's "Everything on It: Poems and Drawings" (HarperCollins). "New" isn't exactly the correct word to use - "Bippolo Seed" gathers together stories that Seuss, who died in 1991, published in magazines in the 1950s; while Silverstein, who died in 1999, left behind numerous drawings and poems that make up the content of "Everything on It. " The books, aimed at ages 6 and up (Seuss)
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a recent dinner party, Lois Lowry was asked the question for the thousandth time. Now that you've had so much success as a writer for young people, Lowry's inquisitor wondered, why not write a real book? "Tell me," Lowry replied. "Would you ask a pediatrician why she didn't become a real doctor?" Lowry knows full well that the implication of the exchange is that "it is somehow a lesser art, writing for children."
BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | BARBARA BOTTNER
In a deeply felt, generous and wise voice still bright with love, Rabble Starkey, age 12, tells us about life in her small Appalachian town the year she and her mother, Sweet Ho, move in with the Bigelows. This is a world where affection, kindness and understanding triumph over every affliction. Mrs. Bigelow, who has a smile on her face even when she sleeps, one day performs a self-styled baptism in the creek and tries to drown Gunther, her baby boy. No matter, we will not hate her for it.
BOOKS
September 12, 1999
Erica Stephens, fifth grader: "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling (Scholastic). "I like that this book's really exciting and has lots of adventures. I also like that it's about a wizard, and there's lots of magic in it." Matthew Sauceda, second grader: "A Summery Saturday Morning" by Margaret Mahy and Selina Young (Viking Children's Book). "I read this book on a Saturday morning. It's about four kids, two dogs, a walk they take to the beach and the geese they run into.
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