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Lois Timnick

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NEWS
January 22, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months to the day after Wayne Satz broke the story of the McMartin Pre-School molestation case on KABC in early 1984, the Los Angeles Times published a moving story about interviews with the McMartin children conducted by social workers at Children's Institute International. The story ran on Page 1 under the headline "Puppets Help Children Shed Horrors of Abuse." The subhead beneath that said "Therapists at Institute Use Toys to Coax From Molestation Victims Secrets of Traumatized Lives."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Having been away for several weeks, I am only now catching up with recent issues of The Times and have become aware of criticism of Lois Timnick for her reportage in the McMartin Pre-School case. I confess I was dumbstruck. Ms. Timnick's stories were in the best tradition of responsible journalism. They were balanced, fair-minded, comprehensive, and did great credit to your newspaper. If I were still a member of the Pulitzer Prize judging committee, as I was some years ago, I would have no hesitation in supporting her work on the case for top honors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Having been away for several weeks, I am only now catching up with recent issues of The Times and have become aware of criticism of Lois Timnick for her reportage in the McMartin Pre-School case. I confess I was dumbstruck. Ms. Timnick's stories were in the best tradition of responsible journalism. They were balanced, fair-minded, comprehensive, and did great credit to your newspaper. If I were still a member of the Pulitzer Prize judging committee, as I was some years ago, I would have no hesitation in supporting her work on the case for top honors.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months to the day after Wayne Satz broke the story of the McMartin Pre-School molestation case on KABC in early 1984, the Los Angeles Times published a moving story about interviews with the McMartin children conducted by social workers at Children's Institute International. The story ran on Page 1 under the headline "Puppets Help Children Shed Horrors of Abuse." The subhead beneath that said "Therapists at Institute Use Toys to Coax From Molestation Victims Secrets of Traumatized Lives."
NEWS
July 11, 1993
Dr. Arnold Scheibel's vibrant personality is beautifully depicted in Lois Timnick's profile, "Great Minds Help Develop Their Brains" (June 20). He is at ease with both young and old, socially and scholastically. He has launched an important first step in demonstrating how delightful it can be to reach out and touch tender young minds. And in the process, they must surely become aware that education can be truly exciting. SHERRY TERZIAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1989
Regarding "Children of Violence," by Lois Timnick (Sept. 3): When it comes to the pain of living in circumstances such as abound in areas like Watts and South-Central L.A., the fallacies are alive and well. Twenty years ago, there was great pain, a "living death" for many; now, the gangs, drugs and killings are just a further manifestation that the underlying needs were never addressed. Eliminate drugs, and people would still need to find ways to lose the pain. PAUL H. LOGAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1988
The Times had an article "Adoptions in L.A. County May Be on the Verge of Crisis" by Lois Timnick (Metro, April 18) about the crisis in public adoptions in Los Angeles County. It was stimulated by a series of letters written by the Adoption Action Committee, an informal group of about 25 adoptive parents, of which I am a member. We wrote to the governor, members of legislative budget committees and county supervisors--everyone anyone could suggest. One of the most distressing outcomes is the lack of response.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1990
This is in reference to David Shaw's recent news analysis that suggests The Times' coverage of the McMartin case was biased (Part A, Jan. 19-22). I have followed the case and its coverage closely, especially the articles by Lois Timnick. Her coverage was not at all biased. In my view her work was an outstanding example of the very best in objective journalism, performed under extremely difficult conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1987
The article, "Controversy Grows as Bill Redefining Child Abuse Progresses" by Lois Timnick (Part I, Aug. 30) suggests that it will become more difficult to protect children from abusive parents if Senate Bill 243 becomes law. Specifically, the controversy centers around the paragraph which sanctions spanking as a means of discipline. The new code would address the problem of whether a child is at "substantial risk" of suffering "serious physical harm" by a parent or guardian. I see no mention of serious emotional harm.
NEWS
January 19, 1992
Your writer Lois Timnick tells a poignant story about her jury duty in the Santa Monica trial of Thomas (Ocean) Harrison for drinking beer and resisting arrest. According to her, members of the jury agreed that Mr. Harrison was technically guilty, and further that they were "sworn to uphold the law." Hence she says they had to find him guilty--even though they did not think it was a just verdict. But they were wrong. If they thought justice would have been better served thereby, the jurors could and should have found him innocent, even in defiance of the law. Last year, six state governors and one state Senate declared Sept.
NEWS
January 10, 1993
Mary Laine Yarber's Education column about suggested student New Year's resolutions (Westside, Dec. 31) is troubling for a couple of reasons. First, there is an assertion that the more you read, the faster a reader you will become. There is no empirical evidence to support such a contention and certainly none that justifies discussing reading speed and comic books in the same breath. Reading is, in fact, a skill. Without knowledge of specific techniques, all the reading in the world will not significantly increase speed or comprehension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christian Brando is "vicious, callous and a serious danger to society," a man who "solves his problems by firing a gun at people's heads," according to a prosecution brief that alleges other violent episodes by the actor's son and asks that he be imprisoned for the maximum 16 years for killing his half-sister's Tahitian lover. The 32-year-old welder, eldest son of Marlon Brando, "has engaged in a pattern of ever escalating violence.
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