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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
A federal judge in Los Angeles has dismissed antitrust claims against a Massachusetts-based manufacturer of car security systems. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp ruled last month in a summary judgment that claims made by Clifford Electronics against LoJack Corp., the manufacturer of a vehicle recovery system that requires police department cooperation, were unfounded.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call them Trojan horses in the war against car thieves. Last month a remote transmitter hidden in a high-end Honda led detectives from the Consolidated Effort to Combat Auto Theft--a multi-agency unit composed of Los Angeles police, California Highway Patrol and Department of Motor Vehicles investigators--to a gated rental house in North Hollywood. Inside they found a newly stripped car and evidence of a $3-million chop shop, one of the largest ever discovered in the San Fernando Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989
An innovative stolen-car tracking system that state legislators refused to approve for Los Angeles last year could be in place by the end of the year under a plan approved by the Police Commission. The commission recommended Tuesday that the City Council agree to a proposed contract under which LoJack Corp. would lease patented, high-tech equipment to the city for five years at no charge and then transfer ownership to the city, officials said. The agreement would amount to a gift of the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | JOHN POPE
The city will become the first in Orange County to offer LoJack, an electronic tracking system for vehicles that boasts a 95% recovery rate. Yorba Linda, which contracts with the Brea Police Department for services, will also be able to use the anti-theft system when it is installed in about two months, officials said. The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to authorize use of the tracking system, which is supplied by LoJack of Dedham, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1990 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Saturday arrested a suspected car thief in the city's first successful use of the new "LoJack" homing device used to track and recover stolen vehicles. "He was very surprised," Officer Stella Lara of the Los Angeles Police Department's Stolen Vehicle Recovery Network said of the suspect's reaction when told he was the first person to be arrested with the aid of the new device. "He thought of himself as a celebrity, because he was the first guy that we caught that way."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
At the urging of Chief Daryl F. Gates, two officials of the Los Angeles Police Department--one a civilian computer manager and the other the department's chief spokesman--have sold their stock in a company that will provide the city with an electronic stolen-car recovery system. The stock sale followed a meeting of top LAPD officials last week at which Gates expressed dismay that any of his top aides would have purchased stock in LoJack Corp., the Massachusetts firm involved in the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1989 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A controversial, high-tech homing device network to help Los Angeles police cars track down stolen vehicles was unanimously approved by the City Council on Friday, despite charges by critics that the system has major flaws and that the selected firm is being given a monopoly in the lucrative Southern California auto security market.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
A bill that would establish a $1-million pilot program in Los Angeles County to test a high-tech system for tracking stolen cars has triggered an intense lobbying fight between law enforcement agencies pushing for passage and critics who say the measure is a special-interest proposal. The bill by Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia) sailed through the Senate on a 33-0 vote in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1990 | CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Los Angeles County law enforcement agency but one has signed on to a private company's high-tech system for tracing stolen cars, and officials of the Massachusetts-based LoJack Corp. say the technology will be available to consumers in June.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a chilling scenario, a man in a recent radio advertisement tells the audience how an armed bandit stuck a gun in his face and took off with his Mercedes-Benz. Fortunately, the victim's automobile was equipped with the LoJack tracking device, which is connected to the Sheriff's Department. Two hours later, he got his automobile back and the crook was on his way to jail. Good thing he didn't live in Orange County.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a chilling scenario, a man in a recent radio advertisement tells the audience how an armed bandit stuck a gun in his face and took off with his Mercedes-Benz. Fortunately, the victim's automobile was equipped with the LoJack tracking device, which is connected to the Sheriff's Department. Two hours later, he got his automobile back and the crook was on his way to jail. Good thing he didn't live in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three high-tech tracking systems aimed at curbing the nation's $7-billion auto theft problem are being introduced this year in Orange County, where an average of 50 vehicles are reported stolen every day. Police say the new devices will enable officers to track and arrest car thieves, often within minutes after a car is reported stolen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1990 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Saturday arrested a suspected car thief in the city's first successful use of the new "LoJack" homing device used to track and recover stolen vehicles. "He was very surprised," Officer Stella Lara of the Los Angeles Police Department's Stolen Vehicle Recovery Network said of the suspect's reaction when told he was the first person to be arrested with the aid of the new device. "He thought of himself as a celebrity, because he was the first guy that we caught that way."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990
An anti-theft system that uses radio signals to lead police to stolen cars went on line Tuesday in Los Angeles County. The Stolen Vehicle Recovery Network's key component is a homing device, manufactured by the Massachusetts-based electronics firm LoJack. The system costs about $595 for a private citizen to install.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few cars get stolen on Santa Catalina Island--in fact, more golf carts than automobiles are typically reported missing. But the resort off the coast of Long Beach is soon to become a strategic point in the battle against car thefts that occur elsewhere in Los Angeles County at a rate of more than 100,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
A federal judge in Los Angeles has dismissed antitrust claims against a Massachusetts-based manufacturer of car security systems. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp ruled last month in a summary judgment that claims made by Clifford Electronics against LoJack Corp., the manufacturer of a vehicle recovery system that requires police department cooperation, were unfounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
A controversial homing device system that Los Angeles police hope will help curb an ever-growing car theft epidemic was endorsed Tuesday by two important City Council committees. Backing for the system came over strong objections by several auto alarm dealers that the action would give the manufacturer, LoJack Corp. of Braintree, Mass., a city monopoly based on an ineffective system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few cars get stolen on Santa Catalina Island--in fact, more golf carts than automobiles are typically reported missing. But the resort off the coast of Long Beach is soon to become a strategic point in the battle against car thefts that occur elsewhere in Los Angeles County at a rate of more than 100,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
At the urging of Chief Daryl F. Gates, two officials of the Los Angeles Police Department--one a civilian computer manager and the other the department's chief spokesman--have sold their stock in a company that will provide the city with an electronic stolen-car recovery system. The stock sale followed a meeting of top LAPD officials last week at which Gates expressed dismay that any of his top aides would have purchased stock in LoJack Corp., the Massachusetts firm involved in the project.
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