Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLokrantz School
IN THE NEWS

Lokrantz School

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When teachers at Lokrantz School in Reseda, a public school for the disabled, arrived at work Wednesday morning they found an all too familiar scene: overturned desks, broken windows and glass and debris everywhere. It was the third burglary in two months, and each break-in has been more destructive than the last at the school that serves 240 students from ages 3 to 22.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When teachers at Lokrantz School in Reseda, a public school for the disabled, arrived at work Wednesday morning they found an all too familiar scene: overturned desks, broken windows and glass and debris everywhere. It was the third burglary in two months, and each break-in has been more destructive than the last at the school that serves 240 students from ages 3 to 22.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | KAREN KINGSBURY
Special education teacher Linda Bidabe of Bakersfield is amazed at how the program she designed for severely handicapped children swept across the country in 1991. Earlier this year, Bidabe's Mobility Opportunities Via Education program was adopted by Reseda's Sven Lokrantz Elementary School for handicapped children. Then in September, other special-education schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District began implementing the new teaching program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
For a moment Friday afternoon, the playing field was level for developmentally disabled students at Lokrantz School as they romped with members of the Van Nuys High School football team and cheerleading squad. The ability gap between the athletic teens and the disabled elementary school children seemed to narrow as they tossed footballs, waved pom-poms and ran a Hula-Hoop obstacle course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sidney Eisenshtat, a Los Angeles architect who designed schools, community centers, bank buildings and synagogues, has died. He was 90. Eisenshtat died Tuesday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, his daughter, Carole Oken, said. Several of his buildings have become unofficial neighborhood landmarks, including the Union Bank in Beverly Hills, the Westside Jewish Community Center in Los Angeles and the Sven Lokrantz School for disabled children in Reseda.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | JANICE KAMENIR-REZNIK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Kamenir-Reznik is a partner at the Sherman Oaks law firm of Reznik & Reznik
When I was invited to be "principal for a day" at a public school, I was inclined to say no. Could I really spare a day from my law practice? Upon allowing myself to be drafted, I was assigned to visit Lokrantz School in Reseda, under the auspices of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn. I am glad I did. The experience left me inspired and hopeful. Lokrantz is an unusual school. It serves the most severely emotionally and physically disabled children and young adults ages 3 through 22.
SPORTS
December 8, 1985 | Shav Glick
A record $10.1-million Ladies Professional Golf Assn. tour will get off to a fast start next year in Southern California with four spring tournaments worth $1.21 million. The 15th annual Nabisco Dinah Shore, premier event of the LPGA, has raised its purse to $430,000, including a women's-record $75,000 to the winner. Alice Miller collected $55,000 this year. Dinah's tournament, to be held April 3-6 at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, will be the third of the four area events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2002 | ERIKA HAYASAKI and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge is allowing the Los Angeles Unified School District to preserve 16 special education schools, prompted in part by protests from parents who want their disabled children in sheltered environments instead of integrated on regular campuses. The dispute over the 16 schools illustrates the passionate debate surrounding special education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 11-year-old Woodland Hills girl whose customized wheelchair was stolen this week will soon have a replacement thanks to a flood of public support. "We've had dozens of calls from people offering help," Los Angeles Police Lt. Robert Warren said. "Calls from as far away as New York. A woman from Northern California even offered to donate a similar chair that used to belong to her deceased daughter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven-year-old Allison Smith's wheelchair is more than just a way of getting around. It's her lifeline. Until it was stolen from her mother's car Monday night, the customized wheelchair gave the mentally and physically disabled Woodland Hills girl the freedom to do at least some of the things children her age take for granted. The purchase of the $5,000 wheelchair was partially covered by Allison's mother's health insurance.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|