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Lola Falana

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NEWS
October 29, 1989
Lola Falana may believe that her faith in God "cured" her multiple sclerosis (MS), but she has no right to imply that the rest of us with this disease are her spiritual inferiors because we haven't been cured of a disease that medical science recognizes as incurable at the present time ("Private Lives," by Betty Goodwin, Oct. 19). Besides holding out false hopes, Falana's comments are guilt-inducing and promote a blame-the-victim attitude that is both unfair and damaging to people with MS. As one who has lived with this disease for many years, some of which I have spent as a peer counselor for others with MS, I also resent Falana's comments on the use of canes, crutches, etc. She has the right to reject such items herself, but for some people, going without walking aids leads to broken bones and/or an unnecessarily limited life style.
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NEWS
October 29, 1989
Lola Falana may believe that her faith in God "cured" her multiple sclerosis (MS), but she has no right to imply that the rest of us with this disease are her spiritual inferiors because we haven't been cured of a disease that medical science recognizes as incurable at the present time ("Private Lives," by Betty Goodwin, Oct. 19). Besides holding out false hopes, Falana's comments are guilt-inducing and promote a blame-the-victim attitude that is both unfair and damaging to people with MS. As one who has lived with this disease for many years, some of which I have spent as a peer counselor for others with MS, I also resent Falana's comments on the use of canes, crutches, etc. She has the right to reject such items herself, but for some people, going without walking aids leads to broken bones and/or an unnecessarily limited life style.
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NEWS
October 19, 1989 | BETTY GOODWIN
Nightclub performer Lola Falana has sung and danced all her teen-age and adult life. In 1975, she was nominated for a Tony award for her performance in the Broadway musical "Doctor Jazz." Two years ago, at the age of 45, Falana was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a debilitating disease of the central nervous system. Others may have predicted the end of her career, but in July, Falana returned with her act to the Las Vegas stage.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | BETTY GOODWIN
Nightclub performer Lola Falana has sung and danced all her teen-age and adult life. In 1975, she was nominated for a Tony award for her performance in the Broadway musical "Doctor Jazz." Two years ago, at the age of 45, Falana was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a debilitating disease of the central nervous system. Others may have predicted the end of her career, but in July, Falana returned with her act to the Las Vegas stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Entertainer Lola Falana, who quit the stage two years ago because of multiple sclerosis, will play a weekend date at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas starting tonight. She's going back to work, she says, because "I'm not into being a chicken." Falana, 42, was partially paralyzed when struck by the debilitating disease in 1987. When she was offered the Las Vegas date, she told herself: "It's now or never. . . . You'd be surprised how high you can rise above these things if you set your heart and your mind to it. You have to move ahead, and make things happen."
REAL ESTATE
April 6, 1986
Four housing industry leaders will be inducted Wednesday into the Hall of Fame of the Building Industry Assn. of Southern California. The 1986 Medal of Honor Award dinner at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel will be highlighted by the induction of Raymond D. Edwards, chairman of the board of Glendale Federal Savings & Loan; Ernest W. Hahn, chairman of the board of Ernest W. Hahn Inc.; Ralph Lewis, chairman of the board of Lewis Homes of California, and John D.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | Jane Galbraith \f7
Offbeat director John Waters ("Polyester," "Hairspray") might seem an unlikely candidate to write/direct a film in the ever-predictable "Female Psychos From Hell Who Kill" genre. Imagine if Waters--the man who made Patty Hearst a movie star in "Cry-Baby"--had been the director of "Single White Female." Instead of a Bridget Fonda/Jennifer Jason Leigh pairing, Waters' sensibility might have leaned to a Lola Falana/Joey Heatherton combo.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When the women call, you've got to show up," said Lou Gossett Jr. These women were the members of the Kwanza Foundation, a fund-raising and charitable organization made up of black women in the entertainment industry. The occasion was the foundation's 17th annual dinner held at the Radisson Bel-Air Summit hotel on Friday night honoring singer Dionne Warwick. Gossett emceed the evening, which was chaired by his wife, Cyndi James Gossett.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Glitz or angst? Camp or gloom? Miss Coco Peru, now appearing at the Gay & Lesbian Center's Renberg Theatre in her one-woman show, "Miss Coco Peru Is Undaunted," is a creature of many moods and mercurial temperament. A sweet solo from Disney's "The Little Mermaid" is laced with barked expletives. An account of a sentimental journey to Ireland turns suddenly acidic. Miss Coco candidly confides, "I'm sorry I write shows to work out my issues and then charge you to see it." We're not.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2001 | F. Kathleen Foley
Varla Jean Merman is an indisputable force of nature. In "Varla Jean Merman Is All Washed Up" at the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center's Renberg Theatre, the flamboyant drag diva displays the dazzling force of a cyclone touching down in a sequin factory. For those who haven't been exposed to her fabulousness, Varla Jean is the creation of Jeffery Roberson, who wryly alleges his drag persona is the love child of Ethel Merman and Ernest Borgnine. The description is apt.
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