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Loma Prieta Quake

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NEWS
October 22, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists have confirmed suspicions that the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake that devastated wide areas of the San Francisco Bay Area did not occur on the main San Andreas Fault, suggesting that the chances of a major quake hitting the area again may not be as low as had been thought. Many experts had thought that the 7.1-magnitude temblor relieved so much strain in that segment of the fault that the chances of another major quake during the next 30 years were considered extremely low.
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NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Angelenos and others who live in earthquake zones occasionally need reminding that quakes can be pretty darn scary.  A new study published Thursday in the Lancet should be eye-opening. Dr. Susan A. Bartels of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Dr. Michael VanRooyen of Brigham and Women's Hospital, both in Boston, reviewed the medical literature on the health effects of earthquakes -- and described them as "devastating. " In the past 10 years, they wrote, earthquakes have caused more than 780,000 deaths -- almost 60% of disaster-related morality.  More than a million earthquakes occur around the world each year, the equivalent of about 2 temblors per minute.  Some of the world's largest and most populated metropolitan areas -- Tokyo, Mexico City, India's Mumbai, Shanghai, Los Angeles, even New York City -- are in seismic zones.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Insured losses from Monday's earthquake in the San Fernando Valley could exceed the $960 million paid out after the 1989 quake in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to preliminary estimates by insurance groups. However, those early estimates were accompanied by repeated cautioning that it will be days--if not weeks or months--before the full costs of Monday's quake can be tallied.
NEWS
April 5, 2007
Thank you for the story on transit artworks ["L.A. Subculture," March 29]. As a fairly regular rider, I've enjoyed and photographed many of these installations. When I show visitors (and even some locals) around the Metro Rail lines, they are delighted and astonished -- the latter reaction because L.A. has rail transit and people actually use it. However, L.A. subway travel does not demand "considerable faith that the Big One isn't going to hit." Recent history shows that any leap of faith should be reserved for freeways: In the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, San Francisco Bay Area freeways and a section of the Bay Bridge collapsed, causing loss of life.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Damage reports continued to pour into insurance company offices Thursday, increasing the likelihood that the Northridge earthquake will surpass the 1989 Loma Prieta quake in both numbers of claims and insured losses. Southern California's seven largest issuers of homeowners insurance--accounting for more than half the market--reported Thursday morning that they had fielded more than 42,000 loss reports in the three days after the quake. The figure includes commercial and auto claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1994
Transportation officials who want to persuade more residents in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys to use mass transit instead of their cars should borrow a few lessons from a northern neighbor. In the aftermath of the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, only 5% of Bay Area commuters made long-term commitments to mass transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until two weeks ago, the construction of a new $45-million Museum of Science and Industry in Los Angeles seemed an absolute certainty. But that was before the war between North and South broke out in the state Legislature. That was before questions were raised about why money earmarked for earthquake repairs after Northern California's Loma Prieta quake was being used to build a new structure.
NEWS
March 3, 1993 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Raising claims of environmental discrimination, residents of a mainly minority community here filed suit Tuesday challenging plans for rebuilding the freeway that collapsed during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The proposed project, set to break ground next year, would route a six-lane, $700-million freeway through West Oakland to replace the Cypress Freeway, the double-deck structure that turned to rubble during the massive temblor, which killed 42 people.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of the darkest moment in its history, the California Department of Transportation has fashioned what it hopes will be recognized as the world's most extensive and technologically advanced earthquake retrofitting program for highway bridges and overpasses.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bay Area commuters have this advice for Los Angeles drivers fretting about post-quake traffic congestion: Get used to it. Since the Loma Prieta quake in October, 1989, not a single damaged freeway here has been completely reopened. Of the four battered freeways in San Francisco and Oakland, one has been demolished and obliterated from route maps while work on the other three double-decked highways is years from completion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996
At last some good news from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority! Let the tunneling from Hollywood to Universal City begin! Those crybaby NUMBYs need to get the message that the Valley needs a rapid-transit link to downtown, and this is the best way to go. Do they imagine that the 101 is ever going to be less congested? They should also consider the fact that the Bay Area Rapid Transit system suffered little damage after the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, while several vital freeway links were severed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1994
Freeway 101 is the Valley's busiest, according to The Times Valley Briefing "Heavy Traffic" Aug. 21. This freeway is the corridor between the Conejo Valley and downtown Los Angeles. All the more reason to favor the freeway route over the Burbank-Chandler route for building rapid transit. Ridership is an important consideration. The visual impact of a speeding monorail passing stalled traffic will do more to persuade people to climb aboard than an expensive advertising campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until two weeks ago, the construction of a new $45-million Museum of Science and Industry in Los Angeles seemed an absolute certainty. But that was before the war between North and South broke out in the state Legislature. That was before questions were raised about why money earmarked for earthquake repairs after Northern California's Loma Prieta quake was being used to build a new structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1994
Transportation officials who want to persuade more residents in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys to use mass transit instead of their cars should borrow a few lessons from a northern neighbor. In the aftermath of the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, only 5% of Bay Area commuters made long-term commitments to mass transit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
More than four years after an earthquake devastated its 86-year-old church, a Catholic congregation celebrated St. Patrick's Day by completing its new one. The new St. Patrick's is a replica of the beloved old church--and an emblem of this farming community, its hardships and its hopes. "It is a landmark both physically and spiritually. It's a real focal point in the community. It's a prominent symbol that people identify with," Mayor Lowell Hurst said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1994
In response to "Let's Do Our Part, Don't Shirk," editorial, Feb. 10: While I agree that we should do our part, we have been led down this path once before. After the Loma Prieta quake a tax hike was approved for a limited period to help cover costs. As expected, at the end of the term this tax was extended without hesitation. If we impose a new tax to cover costs resulting from the latest quake, you can bet that the same thing will happen. Although our sales tax is extremely high already, we should just accept the fact that such a fund will be required on a recurring basis and put a permanent tax in place.
MAGAZINE
April 1, 1990
I am a Bay Area resident, and my sister, Sue Hough, was one of the 50-plus seismologists who flew out to California after the Loma Prieta quake. I wonder how many of those other seismologists also "left young children in the charge" of their spouses. I also assume that if it had been my brother you interviewed for the story, the issue wouldn't have even made print. JANICE HOUGH Palo Alto
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1996
At last some good news from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority! Let the tunneling from Hollywood to Universal City begin! Those crybaby NUMBYs need to get the message that the Valley needs a rapid-transit link to downtown, and this is the best way to go. Do they imagine that the 101 is ever going to be less congested? They should also consider the fact that the Bay Area Rapid Transit system suffered little damage after the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, while several vital freeway links were severed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1994
Your article "Seismic Experts See College Buildings as Potential Deathtraps" (Feb. 1) neglected to mention that in the last seven years the University of California has completed or begun work on its nine campuses to reinforce over 100 older campus facilities against seismic risks. As your story noted, plans call for completing work on 87 other facilities identified as needing seismic upgrading by the year 2001. We are now looking for ways to complete that work even faster.The health and safety of our students, faculty and staff are our top priority.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Damage reports continued to pour into insurance company offices Thursday, increasing the likelihood that the Northridge earthquake will surpass the 1989 Loma Prieta quake in both numbers of claims and insured losses. Southern California's seven largest issuers of homeowners insurance--accounting for more than half the market--reported Thursday morning that they had fielded more than 42,000 loss reports in the three days after the quake. The figure includes commercial and auto claims.
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