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Lomonosov Porcelain Factory

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NEWS
March 4, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign investors in the historic Lomonosov Porcelain Factory celebrated victory Friday after a Russian appeals court scuttled a months-long effort to renationalize the plant. In a case widely viewed as a test of the rights of investors in Russian companies, a regional arbitration court Thursday overturned a lower court's October decision that had annulled the 1993 privatization of the factory. Investors, headed by a fund financed by U.S.
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NEWS
March 4, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign investors in the historic Lomonosov Porcelain Factory celebrated victory Friday after a Russian appeals court scuttled a months-long effort to renationalize the plant. In a case widely viewed as a test of the rights of investors in Russian companies, a regional arbitration court Thursday overturned a lower court's October decision that had annulled the 1993 privatization of the factory. Investors, headed by a fund financed by U.S.
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NEWS
November 19, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a little-known investment fund financed by U.S. taxpayers bought a stake in the historic Lomonosov Porcelain Factory last year, it seemed a constructive way to help the recovery of Russia's beleaguered economy. Instead, it has proved to be the Americans' undoing. Today, the factory that once made tea sets for the czars is a battleground where Western investors and Soviet-era managers fight over the shape of Russia's economic future. In a precedent-setting decision last month, a St.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a little-known investment fund financed by U.S. taxpayers bought a stake in the historic Lomonosov Porcelain Factory last year, it seemed a constructive way to help the recovery of Russia's beleaguered economy. Instead, it has proved to be the Americans' undoing. Today, the factory that once made tea sets for the czars is a battleground where Western investors and Soviet-era managers fight over the shape of Russia's economic future. In a precedent-setting decision last month, a St.
TRAVEL
October 12, 2003 | By Susan Spano
It is 260 steps up from the entrance of the massive St. Isaac's Cathedral in the heart of St. Petersburg to the colonnade that encircles the base of the dome. I climbed slowly and counted. It was winter, and the stone staircase was slick with ice, ending at a high snow-coated corner of the great Russian Orthodox church. There, horrified, I realized that to reach the colonnade, I had to cross a metal gangplank, about 40 feet long, slung over the cathedral's sloping roof from where I stood to the dome.
MAGAZINE
October 12, 2003 | Susan Spano, Susan Spano is a Times staff writer. She last wrote for the magazine on Brussels.
It is 260 steps up from the entrance of the massive St. Isaac's Cathedral in the heart of St. Petersburg to the colonnade that encircles the base of the dome. I climbed slowly and counted. It was winter, and the stone staircase was slick with ice, ending at a high snow-coated corner of the great Russian Orthodox church.
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