Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLon Chaney
IN THE NEWS

Lon Chaney

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000
While the tribute to Lon Chaney was extensive and tasteful, ("Studying Chaney's Many Faces," Oct. 20), and a commemorative postage stamp was issued a few years ago honoring Lon Chaney (as well as a stamp honoring Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff, the "Big Three" of the Universal Horror Genre), I felt the article was lacking in the citing of only two obscure films done by his son, Lon Chaney Jr. After all, I'm certain Michael Blake would agree that Lon Chaney Jr. proved his acting ability as Lennie in the 1940 classic, "Of Mice and Men," and that he was as convincing as "the Wolfman" as Bela Lugosi was as Dracula.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Susan King
Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Wolf Man and the Invisible Man are among the many creatures invading the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in October. The academy is hosting "Universal's Legacy of Horror,"  a monthlong series in celebration of the studio's 100th birthday. The thrills begin Oct. 2 with the newly restored 1935 James Whale classic "The Bride of Frankenstein," starring Boris Karloff as the Monster, as well as Colin Clive, Dwight Frye, Ernest Thesiger and Elsa Lanchester as Mary Shelley and the Bride.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Lon Chaney stands pretty much alone in the history of American film. He became one of the biggest stars of the silent era by playing deeply human, invariably grotesque characters. Chaney's best-known role, the Phantom in "The Phantom of the Opera," is a classic, but until now some of his other equally remarkable parts have been harder to come by. Now the Warner Archive Collection has reissued several of them, many directed by Tod Browning, the filmmaker who was increasingly on his wavelength.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Lon Chaney stands pretty much alone in the history of American film. He became one of the biggest stars of the silent era by playing deeply human, invariably grotesque characters. Chaney's best-known role, the Phantom in "The Phantom of the Opera," is a classic, but until now some of his other equally remarkable parts have been harder to come by. Now the Warner Archive Collection has reissued several of them, many directed by Tod Browning, the filmmaker who was increasingly on his wavelength.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Horror was well-suited for the silent movie. The naturally alien quality of the silents--with their slightly off speed, pushy mood music, primitive lighting and exaggerated performances--always welcomed the grotesque. A few directors knew how to exploit the medium for eerie results. Robert Wiener created the first nightmarish psychodrama, "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" (1919), and F. W. Murnau's expressionistic "Nosferatu" (1922) gave us an idea of what blood-sucking was all about.
NEWS
February 28, 1985 | MARK LOWE, Times Staff Writer
Although Lon Chaney Sr. is best known for his roles as the Phantom of the Opera and the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Michael Blake likes to remember him as a genius who advanced the art of movie makeup. "Considering what he had to work with, it's amazing what he did," said Blake, 28, a San Fernando Valley makeup artist. "And he had a dominating charisma on the screen."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silent film great Lon Chaney was known as the "Man of a Thousand Faces." Several of his most memorable ones are on view in the new Kino on Video "Lon Chaney Collection." The collection features eight Chaney films ($25 each), plus an informative documentary, "Lon Chaney: Behind the Mask." The highlight of the documentary is the 1914 one-reel Western "By the Sun's Rays," one of Chaney's earliest films. All prints have been restored and digitally remastered from the best available material.
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
ACTOR Doug Jones never sought to specialize in playing creatures. When he came to L.A. in 1985 from his home in Indiana, he envisioned himself playing the goofy next-door-neighbor types. His career changed when he landed the crescent-moon Mac Tonight character in the popular McDonald's spots two decades ago. Ever since, the lanky Jones -- he's nearly 6-foot-4 but only 140 pounds -- has become one of the most sought-after actors to play creatures in movies, TV and commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lon Chaney, one of the biggest stars of the silent movie era in the 1920s, is best remembered for his grotesque but tragic Quasimodo in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" and the disfigured Phantom in "The Phantom of the Opera." But even in roles that didn't warrant extensive makeup, Chaney had a remarkable command of his expressive face, athletic body and graceful hands. And Chaney's performances remain fresh and exhilarating to watch even now, 70 years after his death.
MAGAZINE
February 19, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is a Times film critic and the author of "Never Coming to a Theater Near You." He is writing a biography of Lon Chaney.
Feast your eyes, glut your soul on my accursed ugliness. --"The Phantom of the Opera," 1925 * One minute you're a fiend and the next . . . you're almost human. --"West of Zanzibar," 1928 * As an actor and a person, on-screen and on his own, Lon Chaney, the celebrated Man of a Thousand Faces, haunts my dreams, disturbs my sleep and troubles my waking moments. Everyone knows his most famous face: the horribly disfigured Erik, the tortured, wretched Phantom of the Paris Opera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a B-movie actress in the 1940s, Elyse Knox was perhaps best known for the only horror film she ever made, "The Mummy's Tomb," with Lon Chaney Jr. as the monster who kidnaps her. She later recalled working through the night on the abduction and graveyard scenes with Chaney, miserable in heavy makeup and wearing a strap around his neck to help support her weight as he carried her. "After it was over, he thanked me for being petite," Knox...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Cinecon 44 Classic Film Festival gives passionate cineastes the opportunity to see rare and unusual silent and vintage sound films on the big screen. This year's edition kicks off this evening and continues through Labor Day at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. The festival also presents the Cinecon Career Achievement Award celebrity banquet Sunday evening at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. Among the honorees this year are Oscar winners Celeste Holm and producer Walter Mirisch. Among the movies scheduled for the festival are 1914's "Tillie's Punctured Romance" with Charlie Chaplin and Marie Dressler; 1930's "Mammy," the Al Jolson musical that was recently restored to its two-color Technicolor glory; 1917's "Triumph," a new restoration of a previously lost film starring Lon Chaney; and 1929's "Modern Love," comic Charley Chase's first feature with its original musical score and talkie sequences.
NEWS
January 4, 2007
Re "He's a Lon Chaney for Today," Dec. 28: Undoubtedly, suit performers and character artists are completely unheralded in today's celebrity-drenched climate. Like makeup artists and effects technicians, too often, these craftspeople remain tidily behind the scenes. Susan King's stories always give a voice to quieter talents. It's a refreshing break for those of us who are truly interested in the craft of cinema at every level. SCOTT ESSMAN Glendora
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
ACTOR Doug Jones never sought to specialize in playing creatures. When he came to L.A. in 1985 from his home in Indiana, he envisioned himself playing the goofy next-door-neighbor types. His career changed when he landed the crescent-moon Mac Tonight character in the popular McDonald's spots two decades ago. Ever since, the lanky Jones -- he's nearly 6-foot-4 but only 140 pounds -- has become one of the most sought-after actors to play creatures in movies, TV and commercials.
MAGAZINE
February 19, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is a Times film critic and the author of "Never Coming to a Theater Near You." He is writing a biography of Lon Chaney.
Feast your eyes, glut your soul on my accursed ugliness. --"The Phantom of the Opera," 1925 * One minute you're a fiend and the next . . . you're almost human. --"West of Zanzibar," 1928 * As an actor and a person, on-screen and on his own, Lon Chaney, the celebrated Man of a Thousand Faces, haunts my dreams, disturbs my sleep and troubles my waking moments. Everyone knows his most famous face: the horribly disfigured Erik, the tortured, wretched Phantom of the Paris Opera.
NEWS
February 16, 2006 | Susan King
Sometimes an actor and a director just click. Few did so as well as Lon Chaney and Tod Browning in the 1920s, and this weekend the UCLA Film and Television Archive begins a two-month series devoted to them. "I was trying to think of any kind of equivalence of a director-actor collaboration, and the only one I could really think of was Scorsese and De Niro in that they each bought out the best in each other," series programmer Andrea Alsberg says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a B-movie actress in the 1940s, Elyse Knox was perhaps best known for the only horror film she ever made, "The Mummy's Tomb," with Lon Chaney Jr. as the monster who kidnaps her. She later recalled working through the night on the abduction and graveyard scenes with Chaney, miserable in heavy makeup and wearing a strap around his neck to help support her weight as he carried her. "After it was over, he thanked me for being petite," Knox...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
As part of a multimillion-dollar face lift of several neglected but once-ornate movie theaters along downtown Los Angeles' Broadway, the Orpheum Theatre stage will be re-lit next month for the first time in almost 40 years. The 1926 screen classic "Phantom of the Opera" starring Lon Chaney will be shown at the Orpheum on May 11. Korla Pandit, 1950s television star, will accompany the film on the theater's Wurlitzer organ.
NEWS
May 6, 2004 | Michael Mallory
"Van HELSING" does not represent the first teaming of Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster and the Wolf Man in the same movie. The concept was first tried in 1944 for Universal's "House of Frankenstein" and repeated the following year for "House of Dracula." Those films, however, proved to be stakes through the heart of the horror cycle that had begun in 1931 with "Dracula." Universal initially bought the rights to "Dracula" in hopes of luring Lon Chaney back to the studio to play the lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff writer
Humphrey Bogart, Lon Chaney, Fred Astaire and other superstars are on display in the latest batch of oldies-but-goodies recently released on DVD. Bogart was considered one of the biggest stars of the 20th century; four of his films from Warner Home Video ($20 each) -- "They Live by Night," "High Sierra," "To Have and Have Not" and "Dark Passage" -- illustrate why.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|