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London England Elections

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NEWS
November 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Jeffrey Archer, the best-selling novelist who was the Conservative Party candidate for mayor of London, dropped out of the race Saturday after admitting he had once asked a friend to lie for him. "Jeffrey Archer has let the party down, and there could be no question of him continuing as our candidate for mayor," Conservative leader William Hague said Saturday. Archer, 59, won the party's nomination on Oct. 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters here thumbed their noses at Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labor Party on Thursday, apparently choosing its nemesis, Ken Livingstone, as the city's first directly elected mayor. The British Broadcasting Corp. projected victory for the 54-year-old maverick who defied Labor's best efforts to beat him and consistently led in opinion polls. The BBC gave him 51% of the vote based on early returns.
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NEWS
July 18, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This teeming modern metropolis of nearly 10 million people has never had an elected mayor. Bizarrely, London is still run as if it were 32 villages, each with its own small-scale borough council. London's succession of lord mayors, in their furred robes and gilt chains, are purely ceremonial figures dating back to medieval days.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Prime Minister Tony Blair's "new Labor" Party faced its most serious challenge yet Monday when dissident member Ken Livingstone announced that he will run for mayor of London against the party's official candidate. Livingstone, a popular London native who represents Labor's socialist roots, will campaign as an independent against Blair's handpicked candidate, former Health Secretary Frank Dobson.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Voting closed Wednesday in the race for the Labor Party's candidate for London mayor, a competition that pits party leaders' chosen candidate against a man whose victory could be their political nightmare. The results will not be announced before Saturday. The idea of the party's candidacy going to left-wing lawmaker Ken Livingstone has worried Prime Minister Tony Blair's centrist Labor government. Labor has engineered an electoral college that gives Health Minister Frank Dobson a running start.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters here thumbed their noses at Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labor Party on Thursday, apparently choosing its nemesis, Ken Livingstone, as the city's first directly elected mayor. The British Broadcasting Corp. projected victory for the 54-year-old maverick who defied Labor's best efforts to beat him and consistently led in opinion polls. The BBC gave him 51% of the vote based on early returns.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Prime Minister Tony Blair's "new Labor" Party faced its most serious challenge yet Monday when dissident member Ken Livingstone announced that he will run for mayor of London against the party's official candidate. Livingstone, a popular London native who represents Labor's socialist roots, will campaign as an independent against Blair's handpicked candidate, former Health Secretary Frank Dobson.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Voting closed Wednesday in the race for the Labor Party's candidate for London mayor, a competition that pits party leaders' chosen candidate against a man whose victory could be their political nightmare. The results will not be announced before Saturday. The idea of the party's candidacy going to left-wing lawmaker Ken Livingstone has worried Prime Minister Tony Blair's centrist Labor government. Labor has engineered an electoral college that gives Health Minister Frank Dobson a running start.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Jeffrey Archer, the best-selling novelist who was the Conservative Party candidate for mayor of London, dropped out of the race Saturday after admitting he had once asked a friend to lie for him. "Jeffrey Archer has let the party down, and there could be no question of him continuing as our candidate for mayor," Conservative leader William Hague said Saturday. Archer, 59, won the party's nomination on Oct. 1.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This teeming modern metropolis of nearly 10 million people has never had an elected mayor. Bizarrely, London is still run as if it were 32 villages, each with its own small-scale borough council. London's succession of lord mayors, in their furred robes and gilt chains, are purely ceremonial figures dating back to medieval days.
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