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BUSINESS
October 26, 2008 | Lauren Beale
In the misery-loves-company department, Inman News publisher Brad Inman reports on the housing situation from Europe as he meets with real estate industry types there. First stop, London: "Property values fell to their lowest level in 30 years in September, according to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. According to another report, home sales fell to 17,000 in June 2008 from 105,000 in June of 2007, and that was before the financial collapse of late summer and fall. "Prices have fallen 15% in the last year, with some local experts predicting a 50% drop before the bottom is reached.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 2008 | Lauren Beale
In the misery-loves-company department, Inman News publisher Brad Inman reports on the housing situation from Europe as he meets with real estate industry types there. First stop, London: "Property values fell to their lowest level in 30 years in September, according to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. According to another report, home sales fell to 17,000 in June 2008 from 105,000 in June of 2007, and that was before the financial collapse of late summer and fall. "Prices have fallen 15% in the last year, with some local experts predicting a 50% drop before the bottom is reached.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pet Squirrel on the Block: Christie's in London will auction an extremely rare painting on todbeing called the most important work to come on the London market since Vincent van Gogh's "Sunflowers" and is expected to set a record for an Old Master painting in a London sale. Proceeds will help preserve the historic Houghton Hall in Norfolk, built for Robert Walpole, England's first prime minister.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2006 | From Associated Press
World equity markets were mixed Monday as company news dictated trading direction in many nations, while oil stocks gained on renewed unrest in Africa. U.S. financial markets were closed for the Presidents Day holiday, leading to lean volumes on many exchanges. Energy stocks rose in tandem with higher crude prices in London trading. The weekend kidnapping of nine foreign workers and pipeline attacks Monday in Nigeria -- Africa's largest oil producer -- fueled further supply worries.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1985 | From Associated Press
Cocoa futures prices were sharply higher Wednesday on the Coffee, Sugar & Cocoa Exchange in New York as the market tried to trace rumors of difficulties in shipping cocoa from the Ivory Coast. Deirdre Macleod, a cocoa analyst in New York with Prudential-Bache Securities Inc., said a rally on the London market encouraged buyers in the market in New York, which triggered additional buying by traders who follow technical factors such as trends on price charts.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
A shocked and nervous London stock market on Wednesday staged a partial recovery from its two-day, 500-point crash, but there were few signs of celebration in Europe's largest equities market. Prices also advanced on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. The 225-share Nikkei stock average closed Wednesday at 23,947.40, an increase of 2,037.32 points, or 9.3%--the exchange's largest one-day advance.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
A severed AT&T phone line crippled long-distance calls today in the New York area, halting trading at some financial markets and delaying hundreds of airline flights in the Northeast. The problem was traced by the computers that run American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s phone network to an underground fiber-optic phone line in Newark. A crew yanking out an old cable accidentally severed the fiber-optic line next to it, AT&T said. Beginning at 6:30 a.m.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Caught in Wall Street's backwash, a battered London stock market Monday suffered the largest one-day decline in its history, with an estimated 15% wiped off share values and the 100-share Financial Times index plummeting 249 points. Other markets also were bloodied. Panic selling gripped stock exchanges in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Frankfurt, Amsterdam and other financial centers, with records set for one-day losses.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1986 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
To some, it is the Big Bang. Others call it the Revolution. In a country given to understatement, neither is an exaggeration. Changes about to sweep through London's financial district will be revolutionary indeed, affecting securities markets and firms worldwide. Membership in the London Stock Exchange is to be liberalized, and centuries-old restrictions are to be eliminated, providing new opportunities for foreign as well as British financial institutions.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1995
"Lloyd's of London Under Fire" (Jan. 9) was a fine, objective and totally accurate description of the Lloyd's fiasco. The subsequent letter you ran from Peter Middleton, chief executive officer of Lloyd's, suggesting that investors knew--or should have known--of the risks involved in their investment typifies the attitude of many English aristocrats in and around the London market ("Checks and Balances Assure That Lloyd's of London Investors Know...
TRAVEL
November 30, 2003 | John Lee, Special to The Times
Petticoat Lane is still the best place for a hot egg and bacon sandwich at 7 a.m., sold from a rusting roadside van seemingly held together by layers of old cooking fat. Camden's warren of markets remains the best spot for browsing a kaleidoscope of trendy arts and crafts, and Portobello Road still operates like a giant open-air bric-a-brac museum. It's been 15 years since I was a London street trader, hawking cheap Indonesian handicrafts on a table covered with a bright red batik sheet.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2001 | BRUCE STANLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like a suitor who refuses to take no for an answer, Sweden's Per Larsson is biding his time, waiting for the right moment to once again woo the grande dame of Europe's stock markets. Larsson's company, OM Gruppen, failed in its earlier effort to buy out the London Stock Exchange, but he says the chemistry for a perfect fit is stronger than ever. "The LSE doesn't need another exchange--it needs a technology partner," he told the Associated Press.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
A bomb fired nails through a crowded street market in south London on Saturday, injuring at least 48 people, police said. No one was killed, but Scotland Yard said four people had been seriously injured in the explosion near Brixton Road and Electric Avenue. "Clearly the person who set this off is disturbed and had no regard for human life," said Cmdr. Hugh Orde, the Metropolitan Police officer leading the investigation. There was no report of anyone claiming responsibility. Press Assn.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
The London Metal Exchange's chief executive admitted Wednesday that there are gaps in the regulatory procedures of the LME market, particularly its ability to scrutinize overseas nonmember firms such as Sumitomo Corp. In an interview, David King refused to say whether the LME will change its rules on internal monitoring of large positions held by LME brokers or their clients, or whether the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1995
"Lloyd's of London Under Fire" (Jan. 9) was a fine, objective and totally accurate description of the Lloyd's fiasco. The subsequent letter you ran from Peter Middleton, chief executive officer of Lloyd's, suggesting that investors knew--or should have known--of the risks involved in their investment typifies the attitude of many English aristocrats in and around the London market ("Checks and Balances Assure That Lloyd's of London Investors Know...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Pet Squirrel' on the Block: Christie's in London will auction an extremely rare painting on April 15--Hans Holbein's 1528 masterpiece "Portrait of a Pet Squirrel and a Starling." It is being called the most important work to come on the London market since Vincent van Gogh's "Sunflowers" and is expected to set a record for an Old Master painting in a London sale. Proceeds will help preserve the historic Houghton Hall in Norfolk, built for Robert Walpole, England's first prime minister.
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