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BUSINESS
April 13, 1989 | From Reuters
The London Metal Exchange said Wednesday that it will resume tin trading June 1, about 44 months after a commercial crisis halted official dealings in the metal. The exchange's board decided to resume trading, suspended since October, 1985, after addressing the current needs of the world tin market, said LME Chief Executive Michael Brown. The board believed that members of the International Tin Council should "right the wrong" that resulted in the 1985 suspension of the tin contract, Brown said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
February 17, 2005 | Susanne Hopkins
Imagine: kitchen appliances with a finish created from a metal considered so precious that it is traded with gold, silver and platinum on the London Metal Exchange. They loom on the horizon, says Bob Byrne, vice president of new product development at Lima, Ohio-based American Trim, which has tracked trends and supplied metal products to a variety of industries for more than 50 years.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Investigators have widened their probe of Sumitomo Corp.'s $1.8-billion loss to encompass all firms the Japanese metals giant dealt with in the copper market, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission said Monday. The investigation intensified amid disclosures that questions about the scandal's central figure were raised more than five years ago by another copper trader, David L. Threlkeld.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man accused of posing as an attorney to bilk two elderly women who had already lost money in a telemarketing scheme pleaded not guilty Thursday to an 11-count federal indictment. Jonathan Andrew Hall, 30, of San Diego remained in custody at the downtown Metropolitan Correctional Center after U.S. Magistrate Leo S. Papas ordered him held in lieu of a $30,000 cash bond.
HOME & GARDEN
February 17, 2005 | Susanne Hopkins
Imagine: kitchen appliances with a finish created from a metal considered so precious that it is traded with gold, silver and platinum on the London Metal Exchange. They loom on the horizon, says Bob Byrne, vice president of new product development at Lima, Ohio-based American Trim, which has tracked trends and supplied metal products to a variety of industries for more than 50 years.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1985 | From Reuters
Britain's financial experts Sunday warned that the crisis affecting the world tin market could force the closure of the London Metal Exchange and trigger a string of bankruptcies. LME Chief Executive Mike Brown said in a television interview that he had told Trade and Industry Secretary Leon Brittan that the 108-year-old institution could cease to exist as a direct result of the crisis.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Investigators have widened their probe of Sumitomo Corp.'s $1.8-billion loss to encompass all firms the Japanese metals giant dealt with in the copper market, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission said Monday. The investigation intensified amid disclosures that questions about the scandal's central figure were raised more than five years ago by another copper trader, David L. Threlkeld.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1986 | From Reuters
Despite much hand wringing, tin trading has survived the crisis triggered last October when the International Tin Council announced it had run out of cash to continue supporting world market prices. At first, the Cassandras had warned of doom unless the council, representing 22 leading producing and consuming nations, swiftly resolved to meet its estimated debts of $1.4 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man accused of posing as an attorney to bilk two elderly women who had already lost money in a telemarketing scheme pleaded not guilty Thursday to an 11-count federal indictment. Jonathan Andrew Hall, 30, of San Diego remained in custody at the downtown Metropolitan Correctional Center after U.S. Magistrate Leo S. Papas ordered him held in lieu of a $30,000 cash bond.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1989 | From Reuters
The London Metal Exchange said Wednesday that it will resume tin trading June 1, about 44 months after a commercial crisis halted official dealings in the metal. The exchange's board decided to resume trading, suspended since October, 1985, after addressing the current needs of the world tin market, said LME Chief Executive Michael Brown. The board believed that members of the International Tin Council should "right the wrong" that resulted in the 1985 suspension of the tin contract, Brown said.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1988
When I woke up and looked in the paper, I thought I must be living in Argentina (or some place where there is no free press). So "Cathy" may not express any political opinion, least of all a Democratic preference. Only male cartoonists like Paul Conrad or Garry Trudeau may be political. HILDE REACH Santa Monica View received 86 letters disapproving of The Times' decision to withhold three "Cathy" comic strips and seven supporting the decision.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1986 | From Reuters
Despite much hand wringing, tin trading has survived the crisis triggered last October when the International Tin Council announced it had run out of cash to continue supporting world market prices. At first, the Cassandras had warned of doom unless the council, representing 22 leading producing and consuming nations, swiftly resolved to meet its estimated debts of $1.4 billion.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1988
When I woke up and looked in the paper, I thought I must be living in Argentina (or some place where there is no free press). So "Cathy" may not express any political opinion, least of all a Democratic preference. Only male cartoonists like Paul Conrad or Garry Trudeau may be political. HILDE REACH Santa Monica View received 86 letters disapproving of The Times' decision to withhold three "Cathy" comic strips and seven supporting the decision.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1985 | From Reuters
Britain's financial experts Sunday warned that the crisis affecting the world tin market could force the closure of the London Metal Exchange and trigger a string of bankruptcies. LME Chief Executive Mike Brown said in a television interview that he had told Trade and Industry Secretary Leon Brittan that the 108-year-old institution could cease to exist as a direct result of the crisis.
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