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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In an effort to end bumper-to-bumper traffic, London Mayor Ken Livingstone announced a plan to charge tolls for access to the city center. Under the plan, motorists would pay $7.50 per day and truckers three times that much to get into central London. The fee would apply weekdays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Livingstone said he would like the tolls to be imposed in late 2002.
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WORLD
April 10, 2008 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Abu Ubaida al Masri, a suspected mastermind of Al Qaeda plots including the London transportation bombings of 2005, has died of an infectious disease in Pakistan, Western anti-terrorism officials said Wednesday. The Egyptian militant is thought to have died of hepatitis C, a U.S. anti-terrorism official said.
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TRAVEL
July 17, 1994
After extensive renovations, the London Transport Museum has reopened. It's still in its Covent Garden hall (constructed in the 1870s), but now there's a new mezzanine, interactive screens that relay information and show archive film and a restored 1882 horse tram. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and admission is about $6.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In an effort to end bumper-to-bumper traffic, London Mayor Ken Livingstone announced a plan to charge tolls for access to the city center. Under the plan, motorists would pay $7.50 per day and truckers three times that much to get into central London. The fee would apply weekdays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Livingstone said he would like the tolls to be imposed in late 2002.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The worst disruption in more than 60 years hit London's public transport system Monday, and commuters sought to cope by jogging, cycling and hitchhiking to work in the best stiff-upper-lip tradition. A one-day strike idled all but 11 of the 400 subway trains that serve the capital, and all but a handful of its 4,700 double-deck buses. Together, the two systems normally carry about 3 million commuters a day. About one out of six trains serving British Rail's southern region were canceled as engineers refused to work overtime.
WORLD
April 10, 2008 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
Abu Ubaida al Masri, a suspected mastermind of Al Qaeda plots including the London transportation bombings of 2005, has died of an infectious disease in Pakistan, Western anti-terrorism officials said Wednesday. The Egyptian militant is thought to have died of hepatitis C, a U.S. anti-terrorism official said.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-British aviation accord clinched Monday is depressing news for British Airways, long the dominant carrier on routes between London and North America. British Airways' main competition has been Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines, two of the weak sisters of the U.S. airline industry. But the accord eliminates all international obstacles to the planned sale of Pan Am's landing slots at London's Heathrow Airport to United Airlines and TWA's to American Airlines.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government on Tuesday lifted its longstanding ban on new airlines at London's Heathrow Airport, easing the sale of London routes owned by two cash-strapped U.S. air carriers. The decision doesn't immediately open the door to new competition at one of Europe's most important airports, because new landing slots aren't available.
WORLD
January 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A Saudi national suspected of involvement in the 2005 bombings of the London transportation system and of being an Al Qaeda militant was arrested with six other militants outside Peshawar, Pakistani intelligence officials said. The man was identified as Zabi-ul-Taifi. The intelligence officials earlier said that the arrested men were believed to have planned attacks on trucks taking supplies to Western forces in Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1988
Tourist bucks are a big part of what keeps Orange County moving, and those now seriously discussing transportation needs must look at the impact our overcrowded roads and nonexistent rapid transit must have on strangers, particularly those whose language might be something other than English. When the toll roads are in place, the so-called freeways will still be crowded with single-driver cars trying to get to work at 8 a.m. Work schedules could be varied. What is so magic about 8 a.m.?
TRAVEL
July 17, 1994
After extensive renovations, the London Transport Museum has reopened. It's still in its Covent Garden hall (constructed in the 1870s), but now there's a new mezzanine, interactive screens that relay information and show archive film and a restored 1882 horse tram. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and admission is about $6.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-British aviation accord clinched Monday is depressing news for British Airways, long the dominant carrier on routes between London and North America. British Airways' main competition has been Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines, two of the weak sisters of the U.S. airline industry. But the accord eliminates all international obstacles to the planned sale of Pan Am's landing slots at London's Heathrow Airport to United Airlines and TWA's to American Airlines.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government on Tuesday lifted its longstanding ban on new airlines at London's Heathrow Airport, easing the sale of London routes owned by two cash-strapped U.S. air carriers. The decision doesn't immediately open the door to new competition at one of Europe's most important airports, because new landing slots aren't available.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The worst disruption in more than 60 years hit London's public transport system Monday, and commuters sought to cope by jogging, cycling and hitchhiking to work in the best stiff-upper-lip tradition. A one-day strike idled all but 11 of the 400 subway trains that serve the capital, and all but a handful of its 4,700 double-deck buses. Together, the two systems normally carry about 3 million commuters a day. About one out of six trains serving British Rail's southern region were canceled as engineers refused to work overtime.
MAGAZINE
March 30, 2003 | RENEE VOGEL
If your path to enlightenment leads through London, there's transportation on a higher celestial plane than one of the city's traditional black taxi cabs. These days the nirvana of car services is Karma Kars, a five-car fleet of classic Ambassador cars imported from India and individually decorated--or "karma-ized"--by Heather Allan, wife of proprietor Tobias Moss.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
California Gov. Gray Davis' first official overseas trip to Europe and the Middle East is billed by staff as a trade development mission. But among the 20 prominent business and labor officials accompanying Davis on the two-week voyage, which begins today, are some of his most devoted supporters and generous campaign contributors, including several who donated more than $100,000 each to his election campaign last fall.
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