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NEWS
September 6, 1988 | Associated Press
The Cincinnati Zoo has closed its special exhibit of giant panda Chia Chia for at least five days because the rare animal apparently is homesick. "He's normally quite extroverted. That's why we're concerned," said Neil Bemment, the panda's keeper. The 16-year-old giant panda, captured in China when he was 2, arrived in Cincinnati early Friday after a seven-hour road trip from Chicago. That journey followed a 10-hour flight from London, where he has spent 14 years at the London Zoo.
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OPINION
December 18, 2011 | By Jay Kirk
In 1882, P.T. Barnum paid $10,000 to have Jumbo, the world's most famous elephant, shackled like Houdini, stuffed into a crate and sailed across the ocean to New York City. Barnum got Jumbo on the cheap because — unknown to him but well known to Jumbo's keepers at the London Zoo — the elephant had gone bonkers. Jumbo had become such a hazard that his owners feared for the safety of the many children who took rides on his back. Alumni of such rides included an asthmatic Teddy Roosevelt, who, perhaps traumatized by the experience, would later go on to kill four elephants in less than five minutes while on safari in British East Africa.
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NEWS
September 8, 1992 | Reuters
This city's zoo said Monday that it has averted closure at the end of the month after benefactors, including Kuwait's ruler, came to the rescue. The world's oldest zoo, set in London's Regent's Park, announced June 16 that because of big losses, it would have to close Sept. 30. But a spokesman said that publicity about the zoo's plight had attracted a flood of donations and a sharp rise in the number of visitors, and that will allow it to stay open for now.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The ZSL London Zoo’s free iPhone app may soon have animal lovers going bananas on both sides of the Atlantic over a 7-week-old baby gorilla. Using the app, fans can download pictures and footage of mother Mjukuu with her baby boy as he adjusts to life in zoo ’s Gorilla Kingdom exhibit. Since the app made its debut Oct. 19, more than 17,000 people have downloaded it. While the app can guide you during a visit to the London Zoo, you don't have to go to London to make use of it. Providing animal facts, images and videos, it's like having an animal encyclopedia in your pocket.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | Reuters
The London Zoo, the world's oldest, may be closed in September because of a cash shortage, and many of its 8,000 animals risk being destroyed unless saved by government funds. The Sunday Times newspaper reported that the decision to close was made by the zoo's council in March. It said the zoo, built 160 years ago, would need $23 million to stay open.
NEWS
July 23, 1985 | United Press International
Ching-Ching, one of two giant pandas at the London Zoo, died of peritonitis at the zoo hospital after a long bout with the stomach disorder, zoo officials announced Monday. She was 12. "She really was a personality," said zoo spokeswoman Joan Crammond. "You can't lose your stars without a great feeling of sadness." Crammond said that Chia-Chia, Ching-Ching's male companion, will probably feel "little grief." The shy pandas never mated. Their last unsuccessful attempt was in 1982, Crammond said.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | Reuters
Britain's most endangered grasshopper, the wart-biter, has been reared successfully in captivity for the first time, scientists at London Zoo said Sunday. These grasshoppers are called wart-biters because peasants used them to bite off warts.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | From Reuters
Two rare butterflies that spend most of their lives in a drunken stupor thanks to a diet of fermenting fruit were safely back in a London zoo Thursday after surviving heavy storms. Officials at the London Butterfly House said the two South American Owl butterflies, with six-inch wingspans, had miraculously survived temperatures well below that of their normal tropical habitat by taking shelter in a garden shed.
WORLD
August 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight British men and women at the London Zoo monkeyed around for the crowd behind a sign reading, "Warning: Humans in Their Natural Environment." The captives, who won a contest to be in the weekend exhibit, sunned themselves on a rock ledge clad in bathing suits and "fig leaves." A sign informed visitors about their diet, habitat and worldwide distribution. A zoo official said the exhibit "teaches ... the public that the human is just another primate."
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | From Reuters
London Zoo, the world's oldest animal park and a British institution for more than a century, said Wednesday it is about to close forever. The world-renowned zoo in London's Regent's Park pioneered the concept of a caged menagerie of animals for mass entertainment when it was founded 164 years ago. But the Victorian-age institution has fallen victim to changing tastes in leisure and a growing "green" awareness that behind bars is not the best place for wild animals.
WORLD
August 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight British men and women at the London Zoo monkeyed around for the crowd behind a sign reading, "Warning: Humans in Their Natural Environment." The captives, who won a contest to be in the weekend exhibit, sunned themselves on a rock ledge clad in bathing suits and "fig leaves." A sign informed visitors about their diet, habitat and worldwide distribution. A zoo official said the exhibit "teaches ... the public that the human is just another primate."
TRAVEL
August 18, 2002 | MONA MOLARSKY
It was an unusually hot August afternoon by English standards, and I was beginning to regret our decision to join the nobility. Sweat streamed down my neck. Next to me, my husband, Frank, was fanning himself with his program; at my other side, our 9-year-old daughter, Marina, shaded her eyes from the sun. On the stage in front of us, Shakespeare's Macbeth had just come face to face with the three witches.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | MARISA SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of bullets and bombs, the Kabul Zoo in Afghanistan lies in ruins, its few remaining animals scarred by civil war and torment. The only elephant was killed by a rocket. The sole lion has one eye; its other was lost in a grenade attack. The Afghan bear has a blistering sore on its nose from a beating.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
London Zoo will move its elephants to a park in the countryside after a keeper was crushed to death, zoo officials said. The transfer will leave the famed zoo without elephants for the first time in 170 years. Critics have said facilities at the zoo in London's Regent's Park are too cramped to keep the animals. Keeper Jim Robson was trampled to death Oct. 20 after he tripped and fell into the elephant paddock. It was the third fatal accident involving elephants in Britain in less than two years.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Liza Picard takes the "boring!" out of history and puts the people in. She's a chronicler of oppressed spit dogs and primitive surgery, of plague and patents, of wallpaper, water pipes and 17th century poll taxes. For 40 years, Picard was a lawyer for the steely-eyed British cousin of the IRS. Now, she's Britain's most improbable rookie historian, scrutinizing pins and needles of everyday life obscured by history's headlines.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Liza Picard takes the "boring!" out of history and puts the people in. She's a chronicler of oppressed spit dogs and primitive surgery, of plague and patents, of wallpaper, water pipes and 17th century poll taxes. For 40 years, Picard was a lawyer for the steely-eyed British cousin of the IRS. Now, she's Britain's most improbable rookie historian, scrutinizing pins and needles of everyday life obscured by history's headlines.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | Associated Press
A conservation group concerned about the mass slaughter of toads by motorists is building tunnels under a busy road to give toads safe passage during their annual journey to ponds where they mate and spawn. The Fauna and Flora Preservation Society said Sunday it is working with a concrete manufacturer to build the tunnels under a main road west of London near Henley-on-Thames in a pioneering $1,500 project.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chia Chia, a giant panda on loan from the London Zoo, has fathered a tiny cub born to his Mexican mate Tohui. Veterinarians and panda keepers were maintaining a round-the-clock watch on the cub at the Chapultepec Zoo. The cub, whose sex isn't yet known, weighed 4.2 ounces and was four inches long at birth Sunday. The new cub is the first offspring for Tohui, who was the first panda born outside China to survive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
It moved at a rate of less than two feet a year so it took a while for curators at London Zoo to be sure it had stopped moving forever. But Wednesday it was confirmed. The Polynesian tree snail is extinct after the last survivor of the species, Partula turgida, passed away in a plastic box at the zoo. The last tree snail, named Turgi, will have a tombstone inscribed "1.5 million years BC to January 1996" to mark its passing.
FOOD
July 7, 1994 | CHARLES PERRY
Most light cheeses have one third less fat than regular cheese. Now that the Nutritional Labeling and Education Act requires any food labeled "light" to have at most half the calories of the standard food, you may be hearing more about an ingredient called Dairy-Lo, a processed milk protein designed for low-fat dairy products. We first heard about it, by the way, because it took a prize at the 1993 Food Processing Awards, held in early May at (for some reason) the London Zoo.
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