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NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Part of the Bay Area will transform itself into Victorian London for five weekends in November and December with the return of the Great Dickens Christmas Fair & Victorian Holiday Party. This 35-year Bay Area tradition gets underway Nov. 23 at the Cow Palace in Daly City. It continues from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Dec. 22. It's also open Nov. 29, the Friday after Thanksgiving. More than 3 acres will be transformed into London circa 1865. As visitors make their way down narrow streets and alleys, they'll encounter carolers and street performers, perhaps seeing chimney sweeps or Charles Dickens' Tiny Tim and even Queen Victoria.
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SPORTS
November 1, 2013 | By John Cherwa
The first race of the two-day Breeders' Cup card at Santa Anita was run at a little-raced distance but finished with a predictable outcome. Mike Smith guided London Bridge over the 1 3/4 miles to win his record 18th Breeders' Cup race. A race that long is rarely run in the United States so it gathered a lot of 1 1/8 mile horses and asked them to stretch out to 14 furlongs. In other words, the first half of the race is an exercise in watching paint dry. London Bridge came from 8th at the mile to win by a length.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013
Mary Finch Hoyt Press secretary to Rosalynn Carter Mary Finch Hoyt, 89, White House press secretary to former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, died Oct. 17 in Washington, according to Carter's spokeswoman Deanna Congileo. She had cancer, the Washington Post reported, citing her family. Carter said that Hoyt was a "trusted adviser and loyal friend who served the nation with honor and distinction. " During the 1968 presidential campaign, Hoyt served as press secretary to Jane Muskie, wife of Democratic vice-presidential candidate Edmund Muskie, and in 1972, she served in the same role for Eleanor McGovern, wife of Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
By 1980, John Landis had a string of successes under his belt - including "The Kentucky Fried Movie," "Animal House" and "The Blues Brothers" - but the writer-director had long been unable to get his script for "An American Werewolf in London" off the ground. Landis had written the script in 1969 as a teenager. The screenplay earned him a number of writing jobs in the ensuing years, Landis recalled this week, but "everyone, literally unanimously, had the same response, which was either 'this is too funny to be frightening' or 'this is too frightening to be funny.' And I kept saying, 'it's both.'" Finally, Universal, home to many horror classics, released the $10-million picture in 1981, and it took in more than $30 million at the domestic box office (about $86 million in today's dollars)
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG auditing partner Scott London should spend three years in prison on his insider-trading conviction for selling secret information about the accounting firm's clients to a stock-trading friend, the federal probation office in Los Angeles recommended. The tips to Encino jeweler Bryan Shaw resulted in nearly $1.3 million in profitable trades, prosecutors alleged. The probation office, in a confidential report, recommended the prison term, and the information was disclosed in court papers filed recently by London's attorney, Harland Braun.
TRAVEL
October 19, 2013
The Rockwell, in tranquil South Kensington, a block-and-a-half from the Earl's Court Tube station, is a great base camp in London. It's ideally suited for shopping, and Hyde Park and the Victoria and Albert Museum are near. The staff is professional but friendly. The 40 rooms are bright and restful with nice en suite bathrooms. There is a restaurant-bar where in clement weather guests dine at tables under umbrellas on the spacious private terrace. A crackling fire burns year-round in the reception area.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
LONDON (AP) — A host of stars turned out to experience Justin Timberlake's headline gig at the iTunes Festival in London. The Grammy-winning singer Adele, actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Elizabeth McGovern were among the audience at London's Roundhouse on Sunday night. "Star Trek" stars Chris Pine and Alice Eve plus TV chef Jamie Oliver also watched Timberlake mix fresh songs from his new album, "The 20/20 Experience 2 Of 2," with favorites like "Cry Me A River" and "SexyBack.
SPORTS
September 23, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
The Pittsburgh Steelers are in foreign territory, and not just because they're playing in London on Sunday. The Steelers are among the NFL's six winless teams, 0-3 for the first time since 2000, and desperately seeking answers. Never in the modern era of the league has Pittsburgh lost its first four games. "It's a situation we're not familiar with," defensive end Brett Keisel said after Sunday night's 40-23 loss to Chicago. "If we have the type of character we think we do, we can overcome this and find a way to fight back.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By David Ng
It is the West End play that will not be ignored . A stage version of the 1987 movie "Fatal Attraction" will open on London's West End next year. The play, directed by the award-winning Trevor Nunn, is set to open March 25 at London's Theatre Royal Haymarket. James Dearden, who wrote the screenplay, as well as the short film on which the movie is based, is authoring the new play. No casting for the roles made famous by Glenn Close and Michael Douglas has been announced yet. The planned theater production shouldn't be confused with "Fatal Attraction: A Greek Tragedy," a stage spoof of the movie that opened in New York in 2005.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat One question liable to be on theater-goers' minds is which ending producers will use for the play.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and Jim Puzzanghera
NEW YORK - JPMorgan Chase & Co. has made a rare declaration for Wall Street: The nation's biggest bank admitted it broke the law. The financial giant acknowledged Thursday that it violated securities laws and agreed to pay fines of $920 million as part of settlements over the "London Whale" trading debacle. The Securities and Exchange Commission and other government authorities alleged the bank suffered widespread breakdowns in controls and management. Regulatory settlements are commonplace for big financial firms.
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