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NEWS
October 7, 2003
Nowhere in Hollywood's Old West did more Texas Rangers get ambushed, more stagecoaches get robbed and more bloodthirsty outlaws get gunned down by hastily appointed sheriffs than in the Alabama Hills. Tom Mix, Hopalong Cassidy, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans also rode through this landscape of weathered rock faces that -- with towering Mt. Whitney amid a row of craggy Sierra peaks above -- even doubled for the Khyber Pass.
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NEWS
October 7, 2003
Nowhere in Hollywood's Old West did more Texas Rangers get ambushed, more stagecoaches get robbed and more bloodthirsty outlaws get gunned down by hastily appointed sheriffs than in the Alabama Hills. Tom Mix, Hopalong Cassidy, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans also rode through this landscape of weathered rock faces that -- with towering Mt. Whitney amid a row of craggy Sierra peaks above -- even doubled for the Khyber Pass.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2001 | PAMELA A. RICHARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hi-yo Silver, away!" Those famous words still echo through the canyon where the masked man and his sidekick, Tonto, rode through the nearby Alabama Hills ridding the West of bad guys. The Alabama Hills, in the shadow of lofty Mt. Whitney, have been used since 1920 as a location in hundreds of films--and not just for Westerns. Films requiring a foreign country's rocky, desert landscape--think Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, parts of the Middle East, Mexico and South America--have been shot there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2002 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you look closely, as Dave Holland remembers doing, you can find uncanny similarities in the scenes of many old Hollywood Westerns and action films. Where Errol Flynn rode in "Charge of the Light Brigade" is also the landscape where John Wayne starred in "Westward Ho." In "Riders of the Purple Sage," Tom Mix stalks the same terrain that James Stewart crosses a quarter-century later in "Broken Arrow."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2002 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you look closely, as Dave Holland remembers doing, you can find uncanny similarities in the scenes of many old Hollywood Westerns and action films. Where Errol Flynn rode in "Charge of the Light Brigade" is also the landscape where John Wayne starred in "Westward Ho." In "Riders of the Purple Sage," Tom Mix stalks the same terrain that James Stewart crosses a quarter-century later in "Broken Arrow."
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost at the dawn of Hollywood movie making, this little Eastern Sierra town became a favorite outpost for location filming. It offered scenery ranging from Sierra peaks to sand dunes and was used in hundreds of feature films, serials and B movies, most of them Westerns. Movie cowboys from Tom Mix and Hoot Gibson to Gene Autry and Hopalong Cassidy chased innumerable bad guys in the hills around Lone Pine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1995 | DENNIS ANDERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A mother lode of movie history glimmers in the rocky hills just off the highway that leads hikers to Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the continental United States. A few minutes drive from the intersection where Whitney Portal Road meets State Highway 395, movie buffs can find the mountain divide where almost everyone from John Wayne to the Lone Ranger used to head 'em off at the pass. Such movie heritage is celebrated at the annual Lone Pine Film Festival, which begins Friday and runs through the weekend in this High Sierra town about 180 miles north of Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to recapture its glory days as a premier shooting venue for Hollywood films, this desolate Owens Valley town is launching a drive to persuade a new generation of filmmakers and location scouts to head its way. With a fledgling film commission and a recent marketing trip to a locations expo in Los Angeles, the community hopes to boost its profile and reap income for the economically depressed area.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1995 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic. and
Ask not what the world can do for you, says the self-sufficient Lone Pine Film Festival, show everyone what you've done for the world. While the standard festival looks outward, offering itself as a place where movies from everywhere can find a home, the folks here turn that formula on its head, inviting visitors to celebrate what this tiny Eastern Sierra town three hours from Los Angeles has contributed to the universe of film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2001 | PAMELA A. RICHARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hi-yo Silver, away!" Those famous words still echo through the canyon where the masked man and his sidekick, Tonto, rode through the nearby Alabama Hills ridding the West of bad guys. The Alabama Hills, in the shadow of lofty Mt. Whitney, have been used since 1920 as a location in hundreds of films--and not just for Westerns. Films requiring a foreign country's rocky, desert landscape--think Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, parts of the Middle East, Mexico and South America--have been shot there.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to recapture its glory days as a premier shooting venue for Hollywood films, this desolate Owens Valley town is launching a drive to persuade a new generation of filmmakers and location scouts to head its way. With a fledgling film commission and a recent marketing trip to a locations expo in Los Angeles, the community hopes to boost its profile and reap income for the economically depressed area.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1995 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic. and
Ask not what the world can do for you, says the self-sufficient Lone Pine Film Festival, show everyone what you've done for the world. While the standard festival looks outward, offering itself as a place where movies from everywhere can find a home, the folks here turn that formula on its head, inviting visitors to celebrate what this tiny Eastern Sierra town three hours from Los Angeles has contributed to the universe of film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1995 | DENNIS ANDERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A mother lode of movie history glimmers in the rocky hills just off the highway that leads hikers to Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the continental United States. A few minutes drive from the intersection where Whitney Portal Road meets State Highway 395, movie buffs can find the mountain divide where almost everyone from John Wayne to the Lone Ranger used to head 'em off at the pass. Such movie heritage is celebrated at the annual Lone Pine Film Festival, which begins Friday and runs through the weekend in this High Sierra town about 180 miles north of Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost at the dawn of Hollywood movie making, this little Eastern Sierra town became a favorite outpost for location filming. It offered scenery ranging from Sierra peaks to sand dunes and was used in hundreds of feature films, serials and B movies, most of them Westerns. Movie cowboys from Tom Mix and Hoot Gibson to Gene Autry and Hopalong Cassidy chased innumerable bad guys in the hills around Lone Pine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991
The second annual Lone Pine Sierra Film Festival, probably the most tightly focused in the world, is scheduled this year from Oct. 11-13 in the Sierra foothill city. It will show only films shot amid the scenic Alabama Rocks just outside town and will honor only movie folk who made them there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Grace Bradley Boyd, an actress who came to Hollywood as a Paramount contract player in the early 1930s but abandoned her career after marrying the love of her life, William "Hopalong Cassidy" Boyd, has died. She was 97. Boyd, the keeper of the "Hoppy" flame after the death of her western movie-hero husband of 35 years in 1972, died of age-related causes on her birthday Tuesday at her home in Dana Point, said Jane Mak, a longtime close friend. As Grace Bradley, Boyd appeared in 35 films, including "Too Much Harmony," starring Bing Crosby; "The Big Broadcast of 1938," with W.C. Fields and Bob Hope; and "Come on Marines" with Richard Arlen and Ida Lupino.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991
The second annual Lone Pine Sierra Film Festival, probably the most tightly focused in the world, is scheduled this year from Oct. 11-13 in the Sierra foothill city. It will show only films shot amid the scenic Alabama Rocks just outside town and will honor only movie folk who made them there.
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