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Long Beach Aquariums

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NEWS
October 16, 1986
A Long Beach Tidelands Agency study concludes that a proposed waterfront aquarium would be costly and require a site of at least two acres. The study, requested by City Council member Edd Tuttle, says that aquariums of at least 100,000 square feet can cost between $10 million and $50 million. The Tidelands Agency has three sites that could accommodate an aquarium, but the sites have some parking limitations, the report said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Who can turn down a free day to mingle with penguins and a new harbor seal pup? Seniors Day at Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach offers free entrance Sept. 6 for the 50-and-older crowd. The deal: A valid ID is all that's needed for seniors to receive free admission to the museum that houses 11,000 ocean animals from nearly 500 species. Fish, sea creatures, the Shark Lagoon, the Magellanic penguins and other displays highlight what dwells in the southern and northern Pacific Ocean.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Aquarium of the Pacific's newest exhibit introduces visitors to an eerie world beyond the reach of sunshine: the bottom of the ocean, a strange seascape of crushing pressure, volcanic fissures and an abundance of cryptic creatures. The Wonders of the Deep gallery, which is scheduled to open to the public May 24, will be one of the few places where visitors can marvel over bioluminescent fish and opportunistic scavengers that inhabit the biological oases created by dead marine mammals that sink to the bottom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Aquarium of the Pacific's newest exhibit introduces visitors to an eerie world beyond the reach of sunshine: the bottom of the ocean, a strange seascape of crushing pressure, volcanic fissures and an abundance of cryptic creatures. The Wonders of the Deep gallery, which is scheduled to open to the public May 24, will be one of the few places where visitors can marvel over bioluminescent fish and opportunistic scavengers that inhabit the biological oases created by dead marine mammals that sink to the bottom.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Who can turn down a free day to mingle with penguins and a new harbor seal pup? Seniors Day at Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach offers free entrance Sept. 6 for the 50-and-older crowd. The deal: A valid ID is all that's needed for seniors to receive free admission to the museum that houses 11,000 ocean animals from nearly 500 species. Fish, sea creatures, the Shark Lagoon, the Magellanic penguins and other displays highlight what dwells in the southern and northern Pacific Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The Aquarium of the Pacific may finally get a direct line to the ocean. For years the Long Beach attraction has filled its complex of fish tanks and marine habitats with saltwater delivered by tanker truck or barge at a cost of up to $500,000 a year. Now, the aquarium and the city of Long Beach want to draw water directly from the sea, sucking in 50,000 gallons a day with a pump mounted under a fishing pier at the mouth of the Los Angeles River. The California Coastal Commission is recommending approval of the aquarium's new seawater intake system, with the panel scheduled to vote on the plan at its meeting Wednesday in Santa Cruz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to prevent a municipal bailout of the struggling Aquarium of the Pacific, the Long Beach City Council on Tuesday approved a plan to refinance the aquarium and transfer ownership of its building to the city. Long Beach officials say the move will reduce the overall debt of the aquarium, which might not be able to afford this year's interest and principal on bonds sold to build it.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her name is Edi. She's a new mom who keeps her strapping 600-pound baby boy nearby at all times. She's blue, 88 feet long and the newest product of Edison International, better known for electricity. Edi is the detailed, life-size polyurethane and fiberglass sculpture of a blue whale, the world's largest mammal, that hangs from the ceiling of the three-story lobby of the new Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES
Whenever the executive in charge of hiring at the nascent Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific has doubts about a job candidate's ability to fit in, she trots him or her into the office of President and Chief Executive Warren Iliff. If the prospective employee gets a chuckle out of the decor--including the duck feet crossing the ceiling, the antique brass diving helmet and the two stuffed dinosaur-like critters in an ornate glass-topped box--chances are the relationship will be a success.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | JOHN CANALIS
The city's proposed waterfront aquarium will feature a submerged see-through tunnel and other innovative ways to view creatures of the deep, according to preliminary plans unveiled recently. Designers of the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific also have included a snorkeling area with coral, plants and fish; a tank where small marine mammals can play in machine-generated waves, and an educational film room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The Aquarium of the Pacific may finally get a direct line to the ocean. For years the Long Beach attraction has filled its complex of fish tanks and marine habitats with saltwater delivered by tanker truck or barge at a cost of up to $500,000 a year. Now, the aquarium and the city of Long Beach want to draw water directly from the sea, sucking in 50,000 gallons a day with a pump mounted under a fishing pier at the mouth of the Los Angeles River. The California Coastal Commission is recommending approval of the aquarium's new seawater intake system, with the panel scheduled to vote on the plan at its meeting Wednesday in Santa Cruz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Tiger shark. A voracious predator known for traveling the world's oceans and consuming everything in its way: smaller sharks, boat cushions, license plates, copper wire, shipwrecked sailors. But on a recent Tuesday, the new 5-foot-long tiger shark at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach refused to even acknowledge a chunk of restaurant-grade ahi tuna dangled in front of its broad snout. That worried Assistant Curator Steve Blair, whose duties include trying to keep one of the few tigers sharks in captivity in the United States as comfortable, healthy and stress-free as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2006 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
A 2-year-old girl was left strapped in her safety seat in a locked car behind the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach Wednesday night, and police were searching for her mother, her mother's boyfriend and the couple's newborn daughter. "We have their car, we have their toddler, but we don't know what happened to [the couple] and we don't know where their 5-day-old infant is," Long Beach Police Sgt. David Cannan said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2006 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
Three of the five sea lions at the Aquarium of the Pacific -- two females and a pup -- have died, officials said Saturday. The death of 7-year-old Roxy and the demise of 4-year-old Kona and her baby were unrelated, a spokeswoman for the Long Beach facility said, but occurred within a 24-hour period. Roxy had a lethal reaction to anesthesia about 5 p.m. Friday during emergency surgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2004 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
Crouched behind the Long Beach aquarium, a foghorn moaning off the coast, the three Franklin Middle School boys waited. The Aquarium of the Pacific now deserted, the 13-year-olds climbed the wall and began dragging docile sea life from darkened pools, prosecutors allege. They stabbed three sharks and a ray with pipes and left all but one to suffocate out of water. They lobbed small sharks into tanks of bigger predators. They slashed a shark's translucent egg sac and severed the embryos.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | LESLIE GORNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gliding about in a murky quarantine tank at the Aquarium of the Pacific lurks one lucky shark. Barely visible in the bubbly water, the sand tiger shark will soon join about 150 other creatures in a $3-million, 10,000-square-foot exhibit at the Long Beach aquarium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plastic duck's feet glued to the ceiling of Warren Iliff's office give an inkling that the president and CEO of the soon-to-open Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific is no ordinary executive. But if the feet are not convincing, there are the stuffed penguins tottering on the windowsill, the rice paper fish perched on a pedestal and the ancient diving suit crumpled on the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Moving sluggishly along the sea floor, a school of scuba divers scoured the reef off the Palos Verdes Peninsula for specimens to round out an exotic collection of about 10,000 sea creatures at the new Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to prevent a municipal bailout of the struggling Aquarium of the Pacific, the Long Beach City Council on Tuesday approved a plan to refinance the aquarium and transfer ownership of its building to the city. Long Beach officials say the move will reduce the overall debt of the aquarium, which might not be able to afford this year's interest and principal on bonds sold to build it.
NEWS
June 8, 2000 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He got pregnant the usual way. Five weeks later, the weedy sea dragon known as "Mr. Mom" was headed into his final days of pregnancy at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific. On Tuesday, the spiny 8-inch-long creature swam slowly but looked OK. "I'm so unbelievably happy," said Sandy Trautwein, 37, curator of fishes and invertebrates. "But at the same time, it's like, oh, God! It's like I'm the godmother or something. I'm just so nervous, every day that goes by."
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