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Long Beach Area Citizens Involved

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NEWS
October 30, 1986 | RALPH CIPRIANO, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't exactly a hard sell. Councilman Thomas J. Clark was on the stump, talking about a city charter amendment for a full-time mayor. A full-time mayor could have "a considerable role for leadership," Clark told 17 residents gathered in a Methodist Church chapel on a World Series night. But under questioning, Clark admitted he disagreed with a key provision that makes the full-time mayor a non-voting member of the City Council.
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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of the four city councilmen up for reelection this April face competition from a handful of political hopefuls, while incumbent Jeffrey A. Kellogg will go unchallenged. Councilman Tom Clark, the council's senior member, has three opponents in the 4th District, while Clarence Smith will have to beat four rivals to retain his 6th District seat on the west side of Long Beach. Two contenders will try to dislodge Wallace Edgerton from the council seat he has held since 1975.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Local cable TV viewers made it clear that they want to be able to see Magic Johnson's mad dashes up the court or Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's famous sky hooks when the Lakers play at home. Several viewers criticized the local cable operator, Simmons Cable TV, for dropping the Prime Ticket channel that showed the Lakers' home games and other local sporting events.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sidney S. Solomon, a widely respected community activist who founded Long Beach Area Citizens Involved, died Sunday at the age of 71. Solomon, known as Sid, died of a heart attack at a Bellflower hospital hours after he was admitted complaining of shortness of breath. A retired manager for Radio Shack, Solomon became actively involved in local politics not long after moving to Long Beach in 1971.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two propositions on the Nov. 3 ballot could change the character of Long Beach government by giving the mayor more power and virtually limiting elected officials to two terms of office. Of the two measures, city officials and civic leaders are focusing most of their attention on Proposition I. The measure would give the mayor greater veto power by requiring a two-thirds vote of the City Council for an override. A simple majority is now required.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the city spruces up for the Grand Prix, workers are gearing up to raze a homeless encampment of makeshift tents and scattered debris. About 40 people have been told to pick up their meager belongings and leave the downtown encampment that is set up under the trestles of an old railway near the Broadway exit from the Long Beach (710) Freeway. On Sunday, workers plan to move in and remove anything left behind.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, Times Staff Writer
Police officers working to rid the city's redeveloping downtown of criminals and loiterers have a legal right to stop anyone they believe may be about to commit a crime, City Manager James C. Hankla wrote in a report to the City Council. The report--written Oct. 9 but not widely circulated--was in response to concerns by Councilman Evan Anderson Braude and others that a new police task force may have crossed the line between doing its job and harassing people, including the homeless.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Faced with swelling opposition from apartment owners, the City Council has dashed a bid for a law that would prohibit landlords from evicting elderly and disabled renters without a justified cause. The council voted 6 to 1 Tuesday to reject the proposed just-cause eviction ordinance, which backers contend is needed to protect the rights of aged or physically handicapped tenants.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Despite strong reservations by two members and lukewarm support from another, the City Council on Tuesday unanimously voted to place a proposal for a $67,500-a-year, full-time mayor on the November ballot. Under the proposal, the mayor, who is currently chosen by council colleagues and paid $13,800 annually, would be elected by voters beginning in June, 1988.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The apartment manager was livid when she entered the office of Alan S. Lowenthal, university professor and community activist turned city councilman. What did Lowenthal think he was doing, voting to repeal a law that lets police cite or arrest the homeless for camping on public property? Don't ease up, she said, clamp down on the homeless on public and private property. "I clean human defecation off my property that's been done in the night," the manager said.
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