Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLong Beach Barracuda Baseball Team
IN THE NEWS

Long Beach Barracuda Baseball Team

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | PETER H. KING
Chris Gibbs, owner of the Long Beach Barracuda baseball team, stood outside the locker room at Blair Field, deep into a difficult conversation with a player. This was Thursday afternoon, minutes before a game with the Bend Bandits. Gibbs is a huge man--6-foot-7, 350 pounds--and on one of the summer's hottest days he was dressed in a long-sleeved shirt. Maybe that's why sweat ran down his boyish face.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1995 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the season began, they were known as the Barracuda. Now the team has this mouthful of a moniker: The Long Beach Franchise of the Western Baseball League. So begins the constantly changing saga of Long Beach's minor league baseball team, now just known as "The Franchise," which started the season with great promise, only to end up in an acrimonious legal morass.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
Mired in a management crisis, Long Beach's new minor league baseball team is slumping at the turnstiles as well. A spokesman for the Long Beach Barracuda said Wednesday that attendance has averaged a paltry 1,554 people for 19 home games. That's down about 800 people from the team's opening home stand in May. Team spokesman Joe DiMario blamed the slump on competition from the recent pro basketball and hockey playoffs, not the team's financial problems and leadership fight.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | PETER H. KING
Chris Gibbs, owner of the Long Beach Barracuda baseball team, stood outside the locker room at Blair Field, deep into a difficult conversation with a player. This was Thursday afternoon, minutes before a game with the Bend Bandits. Gibbs is a huge man--6-foot-7, 350 pounds--and on one of the summer's hottest days he was dressed in a long-sleeved shirt. Maybe that's why sweat ran down his boyish face.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1995 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the season began, they were known as the Barracuda. Now the team has this mouthful of a moniker: The Long Beach Franchise of the Western Baseball League. So begins the constantly changing saga of Long Beach's minor league baseball team, now just known as "The Franchise," which started the season with great promise, only to end up in an acrimonious legal morass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1995 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dan Barachman heard about the Long Beach Barracuda, he immediately bought a season ticket. Major league baseball had left him with a sour taste, and this was his chance to buy into simpler times. Barachman was investing in Long Beach's new minor league team, one that for the rest of the summer will be playing teams such as the Salinas Peppers, the Grays Harbor Gulls and the Sonoma County Crushers in the newly formed Western Baseball League.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Gibbs, president of the Long Beach Barracuda baseball team, wants you to know that Willie Mays is signed and committed. "He's in," Gibbs says. "No question." That's Willie Mays the pit bull, who will retrieve rubber balls in the outfield between innings at Barracuda home games. There also will be races between sumo wrestlers (or people wrapped in rubber mats to look like them) and "chip-off" contests for amateur golfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
Mired in a management crisis, Long Beach's new minor league baseball team is slumping at the turnstiles as well. A spokesman for the Long Beach Barracuda said Wednesday that attendance has averaged a paltry 1,554 people for 19 home games. That's down about 800 people from the team's opening home stand in May. Team spokesman Joe DiMario blamed the slump on competition from the recent pro basketball and hockey playoffs, not the team's financial problems and leadership fight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1995 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dan Barachman heard about the Long Beach Barracuda, he immediately bought a season ticket. Major league baseball had left him with a sour taste, and this was his chance to buy into simpler times. Barachman was investing in Long Beach's new minor league team, one that for the rest of the summer will be playing teams such as the Salinas Peppers, the Grays Harbor Gulls and the Sonoma County Crushers in the newly formed Western Baseball League.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|