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Long Beach Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996
With citizens already up in arms over parks, redevelopment and the future of the naval station property, the Long Beach City Council was faced with a ticklish problem in balancing its budget. Money had been found to pay for police, fire and other big-ticket city services, but there was not enough to cover several relatively small but popular programs that City Manager James C. Hankla suggested eliminating.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998
Although tax receipts are increasing as the economy improves, Long Beach's stubborn operating budget deficit remains, according to a financial report released Friday. In a final accounting for the 1997 budget year, the report said the city was able to pay its bills only by spending $24 million from reserves and one-time budget adjustments. It said the city had "a structural deficit," meaning incoming tax revenues were not enough to pay for ongoing city services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1996
Buoyed by a surge in sales tax revenue and other signs that Long Beach is in the midst of an economic recovery, City Manager James C. Hankla introduced a two-year stopgap budget plan Tuesday that would avoid threatened layoffs. Hankla, while presenting a new city budget to the nine-member City Council, said Long Beach sales tax revenues increased 8.2% during the first quarter of 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using admittedly questionable cost estimates to bolster their arguments, opponents of Long Beach's campaign reform law have begun efforts to repeal the 4-year-old ordinance and deny taxpayer funds to political candidates. "It's a law. It's not one of the Ten Commandments," City Councilman Jeff Kellogg said in leading a 6-3 vote Tuesday night to put the repeal measure, Proposition R, on the June 2 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
With citizens already up in arms over parks, redevelopment and the future of the naval station property, the Long Beach City Council was faced with a ticklish problem in balancing its budget. Money had been found to pay for police, fire and other big-ticket city services, but there was not enough to cover several relatively small but popular programs that City Manager James C. Hankla suggested eliminating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1995
The Long Beach City Council, surfing in a wave of red ink, has decided to do what just about every red-blooded American governmental body has done of late: Spend reserves and put off any Draconian cuts until next year. After a marathon discussion, the council in California's fifth-largest city took the easy way out late Tuesday, deciding to spend about $25 million in reserves to handle most of a projected $40-million shortfall for the fiscal year that begins July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995
They've upped gas and water bills, increased parking meter fees, frozen hiring. Now Long Beach officials are asking workers to take a day off without pay during the coming budget year. The "voluntary furlough" program approved by the City Council this week is a relatively meager part of the $40 million in belt-tightening that was required to balance the city's $364.7-million general fund budget. The measure is expected to raise $150,000, city budget officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997
The Long Beach City Council has approved a $1.7-billion combined municipal budget that calls for a large increase in parking fines and the use of $25.2 million in emergency reserves to offset a gaping deficit. Under the budget, approved late Tuesday night, the fine for exceeding time limits on parking meters will jump from $17 to $27. The fine for parking in a no-parking zone would rise from $25 to $37. The increase in fines and use of reserves was needed to offset a $32.1-million deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992
Long Beach residents would face cuts in police, fire and recreation services and nearly 5,000 city employees would not receive a pay increase under a proposed 1992-93 budget unveiled Friday. The new $1.6-billion budget calls for eliminating 13 police officers and 14 civilians in the Police Department, eleven firefighters and 10 positions from parks, recreation and marine services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
Long Beach officials on Wednesday unveiled a $1.6-billion budget for 1991-92 that calls for $24 million in cuts, including reducing the city's police force for the first time in recent memory. City Manager James C. Hankla said the cuts, which he said would bring the city to an "unacceptable level" of services, can only be avoided with an increase in the city utility tax and other fees by this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997
The Long Beach City Council has approved a $1.7-billion combined municipal budget that calls for a large increase in parking fines and the use of $25.2 million in emergency reserves to offset a gaping deficit. Under the budget, approved late Tuesday night, the fine for exceeding time limits on parking meters will jump from $17 to $27. The fine for parking in a no-parking zone would rise from $25 to $37. The increase in fines and use of reserves was needed to offset a $32.1-million deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
With citizens already up in arms over parks, redevelopment and the future of the naval station property, the Long Beach City Council was faced with a ticklish problem in balancing its budget. Money had been found to pay for police, fire and other big-ticket city services, but there was not enough to cover several relatively small but popular programs that City Manager James C. Hankla suggested eliminating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996
With citizens already up in arms over parks, redevelopment and the future of the naval station property, the Long Beach City Council was faced with a ticklish problem in balancing its budget. Money had been found to pay for police, fire and other big-ticket city services, but there was not enough to cover several relatively small but popular programs that City Manager James C. Hankla suggested eliminating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1996
Buoyed by a surge in sales tax revenue and other signs that Long Beach is in the midst of an economic recovery, City Manager James C. Hankla introduced a two-year stopgap budget plan Tuesday that would avoid threatened layoffs. Hankla, while presenting a new city budget to the nine-member City Council, said Long Beach sales tax revenues increased 8.2% during the first quarter of 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995
They've upped gas and water bills, increased parking meter fees, frozen hiring. Now Long Beach officials are asking workers to take a day off without pay during the coming budget year. The "voluntary furlough" program approved by the City Council this week is a relatively meager part of the $40 million in belt-tightening that was required to balance the city's $364.7-million general fund budget. The measure is expected to raise $150,000, city budget officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1995
The Long Beach City Council, surfing in a wave of red ink, has decided to do what just about every red-blooded American governmental body has done of late: Spend reserves and put off any Draconian cuts until next year. After a marathon discussion, the council in California's fifth-largest city took the easy way out late Tuesday, deciding to spend about $25 million in reserves to handle most of a projected $40-million shortfall for the fiscal year that begins July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1995
City Manager James C. Hankla recommended Monday a combination of layoffs and rate increases in city services to help offset an anticipated budget deficit of $40 million in the 1995-96 fiscal year. Up to 49 workers would lose their jobs under Hankla's budget proposal. Gas bills would go up 10%, water rates would increase 5.5% and trash collection costs would rise nearly 4%. The proposed $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998
Although tax receipts are increasing as the economy improves, Long Beach's stubborn operating budget deficit remains, according to a financial report released Friday. In a final accounting for the 1997 budget year, the report said the city was able to pay its bills only by spending $24 million from reserves and one-time budget adjustments. It said the city had "a structural deficit," meaning incoming tax revenues were not enough to pay for ongoing city services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1995 | STEVE EAMES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plummeting property values have forced the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency to drastically curtail its efforts to lure new businesses and shoppers to the city's downtown area. The agency, which has pumped millions of dollars into downtown businesses since the mid-1970s, slashed its downtown spending this year from $22.9 million to $13.5 million, and plans to operate at the leaner spending level during the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. Until the agency's financial outlook improves, it will be unable to offer new retailers financial incentives similar to those that brought Crate & Barrel, B.U.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1995
City Manager James C. Hankla recommended Monday a combination of layoffs and rate increases in city services to help offset an anticipated budget deficit of $40 million in the 1995-96 fiscal year. Up to 49 workers would lose their jobs under Hankla's budget proposal. Gas bills would go up 10%, water rates would increase 5.5% and trash collection costs would rise nearly 4%. The proposed $1.
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