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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chase Frank describes herself as a musician and writer, but she says her greatest work of art was putting together "When Words Collide," a musician-driven spoken-word festival that will run tonight through Sept. 30 at more than a dozen venues in the Long Beach area. "I'm just using a city as a canvas," says the Long Beach-bred Frank, who has produced several smaller-scale festivals and concerts in her hometown during the last two years. "My art is to bring people together."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1998 | LINDSEY M. ARENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rest in peace," Ken Reason whispered to a framed painting he keeps of his beloved, drawn with wings and a halo, on a stand inside the rear window of his car. The 51-year-old, ponytailed cruiser was speaking to a picture of a cherry-red 1951 Plymouth he once owned called "Mayflower." "I worked on that car for seven years," he said, shaking his head mournfully. In 1995, Reason was cruising along in the Mayflower when another car rammed him from the front, forever crumpling his ride.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1995
Long Beach's Public Corp. for the Arts has awarded $337,900 to 27 arts and cultural organizations and three individual artists through the city's Cultural Arts Grant Program. Individual artists receiving fellowships of $6,000 each were Cambodian classical musician Yinn Ponn, visual artist Sue Ann Robinson and video artist Bill Viola.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latin American museum finally is opening its doors in Southern California today, although it's not the museum everybody's been waiting for. After decades of planning, politicians, Hollywood stars and Latin American diplomats celebrated the dedication of the Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture in downtown L.A. nine months ago. But because of bureaucratic delays, according to Latino museum board chairman and state Sen. Charles Calderon (D-L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1998 | LINDSEY M. ARENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rest in peace," Ken Reason whispered to a framed painting he keeps of his beloved, drawn with wings and a halo, on a stand inside the rear window of his car. The 51-year-old, ponytailed cruiser was speaking to a picture of a cherry-red 1951 Plymouth he once owned called "Mayflower." "I worked on that car for seven years," he said, shaking his head mournfully. In 1995, Reason was cruising along in the Mayflower when another car rammed him from the front, forever crumpling his ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The foundation that was supporting the Long Beach Repertory Theatre has pulled the plug on the fledgling company, which was scheduled to open its first show, "Elaine's Daughter," on Feb. 20. The company was slated to produce three plays this year in the 862-seat Center Theatre at the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Latin American museum finally is opening its doors in Southern California today, although it's not the museum everybody's been waiting for. After decades of planning, politicians, Hollywood stars and Latin American diplomats celebrated the dedication of the Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture in downtown L.A. nine months ago. But because of bureaucratic delays, according to Latino museum board chairman and state Sen. Charles Calderon (D-L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995
Until six years ago, many of Long Beach's diverse cultures were most often centered among the restaurants and shops of Anaheim Street. Rich in Laotian, Thai, Cambodian, as well as black and Latino culture, the thoroughfare had kept its widely diverse artistic traditions to itself. But now, thanks to the opening in 1989 of Homeland Neighborhood Cultural Center, Anaheim Street's diversity has been recognized nationally. The National Recreation and Parks Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL and ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The artist Wyland's plans to cover the curving walls of the Long Beach Arena with the largest whale mural in the world have been controversial from the start. Schoolchildren and Wyland boosters have trooped to City Hall to say how wonderful his work is, while others have denounced his airbrush paintings as oversized schlock. This week--as the Laguna Beach artist was applying the first waves of blue paint to the arena--an anonymous opponent decided to stir things up further.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1995 | Cheo H. Coker, Cheo H. Coker is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In the history of pop music, a few locales have come to symbolize revolutions in at titude and sound. There was New York's 52nd Street for the be-boppers who clubbed there in the '40s. Memphis' Union Street, where Sun Records housed the rockabilly antics of Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis in the '50s. And London's Abbey Road, where the Beatles transformed a straight classical recording studio into a rock 'n' roll shrine in the '60s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995
Until six years ago, many of Long Beach's diverse cultures were most often centered among the restaurants and shops of Anaheim Street. Rich in Laotian, Thai, Cambodian, as well as black and Latino culture, the thoroughfare had kept its widely diverse artistic traditions to itself. But now, thanks to the opening in 1989 of Homeland Neighborhood Cultural Center, Anaheim Street's diversity has been recognized nationally. The National Recreation and Parks Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chase Frank describes herself as a musician and writer, but she says her greatest work of art was putting together "When Words Collide," a musician-driven spoken-word festival that will run tonight through Sept. 30 at more than a dozen venues in the Long Beach area. "I'm just using a city as a canvas," says the Long Beach-bred Frank, who has produced several smaller-scale festivals and concerts in her hometown during the last two years. "My art is to bring people together."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1995
Long Beach's Public Corp. for the Arts has awarded $337,900 to 27 arts and cultural organizations and three individual artists through the city's Cultural Arts Grant Program. Individual artists receiving fellowships of $6,000 each were Cambodian classical musician Yinn Ponn, visual artist Sue Ann Robinson and video artist Bill Viola.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's got to be method behind the madness when a concert series offers the Blazers with Candye Kane and the Swingin' Armadillos one week and Seigneur Tabu Ley Rochereau and Orchestre Afrisa International the next. That's what the Long Beach Museum of Art will be offering in its 10th summer season, which starts Wednesday and will continue through Aug. 23. And you know there's method, and a sound one, when the series is not only stable but growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1995 | Cheo H. Coker, Cheo H. Coker is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In the history of pop music, a few locales have come to symbolize revolutions in at titude and sound. There was New York's 52nd Street for the be-boppers who clubbed there in the '40s. Memphis' Union Street, where Sun Records housed the rockabilly antics of Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis in the '50s. And London's Abbey Road, where the Beatles transformed a straight classical recording studio into a rock 'n' roll shrine in the '60s.
NEWS
July 2, 1992
It's a balmy Wednesday night and your after-work life is about to step into a relaxing low gear. You and your honey--or maybe your family, or your pals--had the foresight to pop a blanket or beach chairs in the car so you can stake out a space on the gently rolling lawn-by-the-sea of the Long Beach Museum of Art.
NEWS
July 2, 1992
It's a balmy Wednesday night and your after-work life is about to step into a relaxing low gear. You and your honey--or maybe your family, or your pals--had the foresight to pop a blanket or beach chairs in the car so you can stake out a space on the gently rolling lawn-by-the-sea of the Long Beach Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's got to be method behind the madness when a concert series offers the Blazers with Candye Kane and the Swingin' Armadillos one week and Seigneur Tabu Ley Rochereau and Orchestre Afrisa International the next. That's what the Long Beach Museum of Art will be offering in its 10th summer season, which starts Wednesday and will continue through Aug. 23. And you know there's method, and a sound one, when the series is not only stable but growing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL and ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The artist Wyland's plans to cover the curving walls of the Long Beach Arena with the largest whale mural in the world have been controversial from the start. Schoolchildren and Wyland boosters have trooped to City Hall to say how wonderful his work is, while others have denounced his airbrush paintings as oversized schlock. This week--as the Laguna Beach artist was applying the first waves of blue paint to the arena--an anonymous opponent decided to stir things up further.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The foundation that was supporting the Long Beach Repertory Theatre has pulled the plug on the fledgling company, which was scheduled to open its first show, "Elaine's Daughter," on Feb. 20. The company was slated to produce three plays this year in the 862-seat Center Theatre at the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center.
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