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Long Beach Ca Government Employees Labor Relations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Unable to forge a new labor contract with the Long Beach Police Officers Assn., Long Beach city officials said Wednesday that they have begun taking steps to enforce the provisions of their last contract offer in the 642-member Police Department. A state appeals court this week refused the police union's request for a stay that would have barred the city from implementing the contract offer while the union appeals a Superior Court decision.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Police Department, rocked by reports that it had the highest percentage of unsolved violent crimes of any major city in California last year, has ordered more than 150 detectives to work six-day weeks in an attempt to clear hundreds of backlogged cases. The mandatory overtime, which will begin this weekend and continue indefinitely, was ordered by Deputy Chief Robert Luman and applauded by the police union "for the good of the city," which is in the grip of a record crime wave.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
After 13 months of an increasingly bitter contract dispute, the Long Beach police union and city management representatives reached a "conceptual agreement" Friday afternoon. Both sides hailed the agreement as a fair compromise, but a spokesman for the Police Officers Assn. said he did not know whether the rank-and-file will approve it. "We've got a lot of anger out there," said union Vice President Terry Holland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990
The Long Beach City Council on Tuesday approved a new contract with the police union that ends a year of heated labor negotiations marked by court fights, picketing and emotional condemnations by both sides. The contract, approved last week by union membership 211-139, amounts to a compromise on several bitterly fought issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1990
For the first time in a bitter 10-month labor battle with Long Beach, leaders of the city's police union Friday raised the possibility of a strike, although they insisted that they would only take the action as a last resort. "A strike will be our absolute last alternative, but we do have a strike plan now," Mike Tracy, president of the Long Beach Police Officers Assn., said Friday. "My personal opinion is we will never get there. But we do realize it's something we have to plan for."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1989
The Long Beach City Council on Tuesday agreed to extend contract talks with the local police union, forestalling for at least another two weeks the threat of an impasse. City negotiators had recommended that the council declare an impasse in bargaining talks with the 610-member Long Beach Police Officers' Assn., but union officials said they wanted to return to the bargaining table with a new contract offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1989
A Superior Court judge has postponed a ruling in a labor dispute between the Long Beach police union and city management, while indicating that she will side with the city. The 610-member Long Beach Police Officers Assn. is trying to stop the city from imposing a new contract without the union's consent. But at a Los Angeles court hearing Thursday, Judge Dzintra Janavs disagreed with the union's arguments, saying federal case law supported the city's actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990
The Long Beach City Council on Tuesday approved a new contract with the police union that ends a year of heated labor negotiations marked by court fights, picketing and emotional condemnations by both sides. The contract, approved last week by union membership 211-139, amounts to a compromise on several bitterly fought issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Police Department, rocked by reports that it had the highest percentage of unsolved violent crimes of any major city in California last year, has ordered more than 150 detectives to work six-day weeks in an attempt to clear hundreds of backlogged cases. The mandatory overtime, which will begin this weekend and continue indefinitely, was ordered by Deputy Chief Robert Luman and applauded by the police union "for the good of the city," which is in the grip of a record crime wave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
After 13 months of an increasingly bitter contract dispute, the Long Beach police union and city management representatives reached a "conceptual agreement" Friday afternoon. Both sides hailed the agreement as a fair compromise, but a spokesman for the Police Officers Assn. said he did not know whether the rank-and-file will approve it. "We've got a lot of anger out there," said union Vice President Terry Holland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
Unable to forge a new labor contract with the Long Beach Police Officers Assn., Long Beach city officials said Wednesday that they have begun taking steps to enforce the provisions of their last contract offer in the 642-member Police Department. A state appeals court this week refused the police union's request for a stay that would have barred the city from implementing the contract offer while the union appeals a Superior Court decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1990
For the first time in a bitter 10-month labor battle with Long Beach, leaders of the city's police union Friday raised the possibility of a strike, although they insisted that they would only take the action as a last resort. "A strike will be our absolute last alternative, but we do have a strike plan now," Mike Tracy, president of the Long Beach Police Officers Assn., said Friday. "My personal opinion is we will never get there. But we do realize it's something we have to plan for."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1989
A Superior Court judge has postponed a ruling in a labor dispute between the Long Beach police union and city management, while indicating that she will side with the city. The 610-member Long Beach Police Officers Assn. is trying to stop the city from imposing a new contract without the union's consent. But at a Los Angeles court hearing Thursday, Judge Dzintra Janavs disagreed with the union's arguments, saying federal case law supported the city's actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1989
The Long Beach City Council on Tuesday agreed to extend contract talks with the local police union, forestalling for at least another two weeks the threat of an impasse. City negotiators had recommended that the council declare an impasse in bargaining talks with the 610-member Long Beach Police Officers' Assn., but union officials said they wanted to return to the bargaining table with a new contract offer.
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