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October 20, 1995 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bert Grimm's Tattoo Studio used to need 10 full-time artists to keep up with the legions of sailors waiting to go under the needle. There was the kid, fresh from boot camp, who wanted classic Navy emblems etched into his chest. The superstitious sea dog who thought tattoos of a chicken and a pig would keep him afloat. The love struck sailor who asked to have his sweetheart's name inked on his arm forever, only to gasp in horror when the relationship fizzled weeks later.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renovation of the venerable Queen Mary in Long Beach remains at a near standstill amid allegations that the ocean liner's operator owes the main contractor at least $2.6 million and has improperly diverted funds earmarked for the project. The accusations are part of a bitter contract dispute in Long Beach Superior Court that threatens to erode the earnings of the city's icon at a time when the attraction has reported several years of improving profits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach and Walt Disney Co. officials were advised in 1990 that the Queen Mary ocean liner is so rusted in some areas that its hull could spring a leak, flooding the lower portions of the vessel and possibly trapping employees and tourists, according to city documents. No action has been taken to correct the problem because of the cost and disagreements over who is responsible for the work, according to officials and city documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach and a group of preservationists intent on saving part of the Long Beach Naval Station declared a truce Friday in the rancorous dispute over the port's effort to build cargo terminals on the closed base. As part of a wide-ranging agreement, port officials promised to establish a $4.5-million trust fund to buy historical properties in Long Beach if architecturally significant buildings at the base are demolished to make room for new facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997
Long Beach historians know it as a seven-story architectural treasure where members of an elite men's club would file past Greek columns 50 feet high to dine in themed banquet halls and enjoy live theater. But over time, the former Masonic temple known as Morgan Hall deteriorated into an indoor junkyard, its marbled halls overrun with stray dogs and, finally, transients. Now it's up for sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of indecision and haggling, the Long Beach City Council finally decided to take over the Queen Mary and keep the landmark in town--but not before the ship's hotel closed and about 900 people lost their jobs. The months-long debate over the fate of the ship also cost the city two conventions, which would have brought thousands of people into the city's hotels and restaurants and produced an estimated $4 million in revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1988 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
They're all gone from Long Beach's Walk of a Thousand Lights now--Reckless Ross, the Stone Man, Painless Parker, the bullet-riddled Al Capone Car (which really wasn't), the Oklahoma Mummy Man (which really was, although no one knew it at the time). The Walk of a Thousand Lights, better known as the Pike, is about 997 short today. It's a 13-acre asphalt desert inhabited by a couple of abandoned buildings, junked cars, a cafe, a bar and, lit up by a red copper sign, Looff's Hippodrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Long Beach Symphony was in debt and foundering, supporters called Joseph F. Prevratil to save it. When the city's Chamber of Commerce was nearly a quarter of a million in the red, officials called Prevratil to balance the books. When Long Beach's largest developer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the company asked Prevratil to help shepherd it back to solvency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach has received 13 proposals to buy the Queen Mary--including one that would return the ship to its original port in England--and five other offers to run the city-owned tourist attraction where it is moored, officials said Tuesday. At least eight of the proposals would move the ship to other countries, including Japan and Canada, said Steven Dillenbeck, director of the city's Harbor Department, which has jurisdiction over the Queen Mary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996
The central Long Beach neighborhood of Rose Park, known for its craftsman bungalows, has won the city's 14th historical district designation. From now on, any renovations within the area that are visible from the sidewalk face review by city staff. The emphasis will be on preserving the style that has made the neighborhood one of the city's architectural treasures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1997
Visitors to downtown Long Beach will be able to see that the smokestacks of the Queen Mary have been repainted their original bright red. Last painted in 1994, the color faded within a year. This time, the smokestacks are being painted the original "Cunard Red" with a guarantee from Sherwin-Williams that the finish will last, said contractor Wilson Grant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1997
Long Beach workers have begun dismantling an obsolete gas storage container that has served as a city landmark for 63 years. Crews began cutting off the lid of the 220-foot-high, 10-million-cubic-foot structure last week and expect to complete the job within four months. One of five tanks built in 1927 to ensure a steady supply of natural gas, the container alongside the San Diego Freeway has remained empty since 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Japanese promoters, it's an irresistible combination: the Queen Mary's fabled history and high-brow exclusivity, the Japanese public's penchant for booms and brand names, and the hottest destination spot in Tokyo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the Queen Mary is too important an icon to let go, Long Beach City Manager James C. Hankla on Friday strongly recommended that the City Council refuse to sell the ship or send it temporarily to Tokyo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997
Long Beach's plan to raze its closed Naval Station and build a $200-million cargo terminal suffered another legal setback Friday when a judge ruled that the city's port commission must consider the project a third time. Acting on a request by preservationists, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien ordered the commission to consider the project "free and clear" of any predisposition and report back to him by mid-May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1997
A lawsuit by a television host to block demolition of the Long Beach Naval Station should be heard, but the state cannot be forced to pay damages no matter the outcome, a judge ruled Thursday. Huell Howser, host of KCET's "California's Gold" and other shows, contends that the abandoned recreational and housing facilities on the base should be made available to the public instead of being razed. Long Beach officials say the land would be put to a more profitable use as a cargo terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1997
Long Beach workers have begun dismantling an obsolete gas storage container that has served as a city landmark for 63 years. Crews began cutting off the lid of the 220-foot-high, 10-million-cubic-foot structure last week and expect to complete the job within four months. One of five tanks built in 1927 to ensure a steady supply of natural gas, the container alongside the San Diego Freeway has remained empty since 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach City Council voted Tuesday to take control of the Queen Mary and lease it to a new operator, ending months of uncertainty and haggling over the future of the landmark. The action, approved on an 8-1 vote, calls for transfer of the ship at the end of the year to the city from the independently governed Harbor Department, which wanted to sell the vessel to a Hong Kong firm for $20 million. Under terms of the agreement, the Harbor Department is to give the city $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1997
Long Beach historians know it as a seven-story architectural treasure where members of an elite men's club would file past Greek columns 50 feet high to dine in themed banquet halls and enjoy live theater. But over time, the former Masonic temple known as Morgan Hall deteriorated into an indoor junkyard, its marbled halls overrun with stray dogs and, finally, transients. Now it's up for sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Queen Mary, at least for now, is staying in Long Beach. The Long Beach City Council voted Tuesday night to delay a decision for at least 60 days on whether to allow the operator of the famed ship to tow it to Japan and base it there for three to five years to raise money for repairs and restoration. In a session punctuated by references to the Titanic and "Ship of Fools," the nine-member City Council decided it wanted to know a lot more about the proposal by Queen Mary operator Joseph F.
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