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Long Beach Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1996
A group of Long Beach businesses won permission this week to establish a security tax across their industrial section of the city. The City Council voted unanimously to establish a tax assessment district among more than 300 property owners in a square-mile section northwest of downtown. The Magnolia Industrial Group gathered overwhelming support among property owners this spring for 24-hour private security services in the commercial neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to derail a popular ballot initiative that could halve utility taxes, the Long Beach City Council on Tuesday night approved a competing measure that offers the public less tax relief. The city's alternative measure is designed to thwart a grass-roots initiative aimed at reducing the city's utility tax from 10% to 5% over the next five years. The tax, which is added to gas, water, electricity and phone bills, costs the average resident $200 a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach city leaders, who seem to have a knack for angering local voters, have stirred up another hornet's nest. This time they have turned a seemingly slam-dunk public policy question--construction of a new 911 emergency communications center that everyone agrees is necessary--into the most bitterly debated civic issue in months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is this new city policy in Long Beach. Call it keeping Cal Worthington happy. Or putting the screws to Signal Hill and Lakewood. Or rolling over local residents fighting to preserve their neighborhoods. You can also call it dialing up dollars. It's all about the way many California cities these days are raising money to pay for police, fire and other city services. Long Beach has arrived relatively late for the party, but the city is trying with a vengeance to catch up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997
A controversial plan to use a refuse tax increase to partially finance a $27-million 911 emergency command center in Long Beach was scrapped Tuesday by the City Council. On a unanimous vote, the council ordered City Manager James C. Hankla to come up with a new plan. Hankla was told to explore finding $1.5 million to $2 million through budget cuts, or coming up with a new bond proposal to pay for the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is this new city policy in Long Beach. Call it keeping Cal Worthington happy. Or putting the screws to Signal Hill and Lakewood. Or rolling over local residents fighting to preserve their neighborhoods. You can also call it dialing up dollars. It's all about the way many California cities these days are raising money to pay for police, fire and other city services. Long Beach has arrived relatively late for the party, but the city is trying with a vengeance to catch up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to derail a popular ballot initiative that could halve utility taxes, the Long Beach City Council on Tuesday night approved a competing measure that offers the public less tax relief. The city's alternative measure is designed to thwart a grass-roots initiative aimed at reducing the city's utility tax from 10% to 5% over the next five years. The tax, which is added to gas, water, electricity and phone bills, costs the average resident $200 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. is preparing today to give the public its first official look at plans for a billion-dollar theme park the entertainment giant is thinking of building in Long Beach--a project that could turn that tax-poor city into a tourist boom town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997
After months of emotional debate over methods of financing a new 911 emergency operations center, the Long Beach City Council voted 7-0 Tuesday to begin the project with $4 million--and figure out later how to pay for the rest of the $27 million facility. In November, the City Council asked voters to approve a 30-year general obligation bond. The measure failed to get the necessary two-thirds voter approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997
After months of emotional debate over methods of financing a new 911 emergency operations center, the Long Beach City Council voted 7-0 Tuesday to begin the project with $4 million--and figure out later how to pay for the rest of the $27 million facility. In November, the City Council asked voters to approve a 30-year general obligation bond. The measure failed to get the necessary two-thirds voter approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997
A controversial plan to use a refuse tax increase to partially finance a $27-million 911 emergency command center in Long Beach was scrapped Tuesday by the City Council. On a unanimous vote, the council ordered City Manager James C. Hankla to come up with a new plan. Hankla was told to explore finding $1.5 million to $2 million through budget cuts, or coming up with a new bond proposal to pay for the center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach city leaders, who seem to have a knack for angering local voters, have stirred up another hornet's nest. This time they have turned a seemingly slam-dunk public policy question--construction of a new 911 emergency communications center that everyone agrees is necessary--into the most bitterly debated civic issue in months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1996
A group of Long Beach businesses won permission this week to establish a security tax across their industrial section of the city. The City Council voted unanimously to establish a tax assessment district among more than 300 property owners in a square-mile section northwest of downtown. The Magnolia Industrial Group gathered overwhelming support among property owners this spring for 24-hour private security services in the commercial neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. is preparing today to give the public its first official look at plans for a billion-dollar theme park the entertainment giant is thinking of building in Long Beach--a project that could turn that tax-poor city into a tourist boom town.
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