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Long Beach Ca Zoning

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
A proposed ordinance streamlining the process that disabled residents will go through when they apply for building permits or zoning changes was tentatively approved Tuesday by the Long Beach City Council. The council members unanimously decided to join only a few other cities in the United States with special provisions for the disabled in building and zoning code permit approvals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of mounting community opposition, one of Los Angeles County's largest providers of substance abuse services has dropped its bid to expand treatment operations in a historic Long Beach neighborhood. The Substance Abuse Foundation of Long Beach has withdrawn its appeal of a Planning Commission decision denying the nonprofit organization permission to increase client occupancy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996
The Long Beach City Council has approved without dissent zoning variances and amendments to the local coastal plan that would allow the California State University system to construct a $35-million waterfront headquarters building. The variances approved Tuesday apply to a six-story building that would be built across the street from the current headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald H. Banner started small in 1988, opening a modest treatment center for addicts in Rose Park, an aging Long Beach neighborhood filled with turn-of-the century bungalows. Then he began buying the surrounding real estate, steadily building a portfolio of more than 20 buildings that were converted into treatment facilities and sober-living homes for an expanding client list. Virtually all are in the same square block.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995
Against a decade of neighborhood opposition, the Long Beach City Council voted 7 to 1 this week to open nine parking spaces in space-squeezed Belmont Shore. For 10 years, the owners of a 3,000-square-foot paved lot at 207 St. Joseph Ave. have wanted to open the area to parking, but their plans were stalled by city regulations and community opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
Long Beach has begun public hearings on a major rezoning plan aimed at making downtown an important regional center. "By bringing together business, residential, redevelopment and historical perspectives we can create an organized development plan for downtown," said planning official Bob Benard. The proposed plan allows unlimited building heights on Ocean Boulevard and encourages construction of restaurants, stores and bars at street level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the face of mounting community opposition, one of Los Angeles County's largest providers of substance abuse services has dropped its bid to expand treatment operations in a historic Long Beach neighborhood. The Substance Abuse Foundation of Long Beach has withdrawn its appeal of a Planning Commission decision denying the nonprofit organization permission to increase client occupancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995
Proponents who want to open a halfway house in North Long Beach knew their neighbors would be a hard-sell. For that reason they chose a quiet industrial area surrounded by warehouses to provide job training and housing to 50 nonviolent inmates nearing parole. "How could you find a better location?" said Bob Pratt, president of Volunteers of America, the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group behind the proposed facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald H. Banner started small in 1988, opening a modest treatment center for addicts in Rose Park, an aging Long Beach neighborhood filled with turn-of-the century bungalows. Then he began buying the surrounding real estate, steadily building a portfolio of more than 20 buildings that were converted into treatment facilities and sober-living homes for an expanding client list. Virtually all are in the same square block.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1994 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patsy Barggren thought she had a pretty good argument for erecting the tall wood fence around part of her Long Beach home in 1991. Her house had been burglarized several times, cars had been stolen, and she had been feuding with a neighbor, she said. City inspectors OKd the fence in the early stages of construction. But they withdrew the approval after neighbors complained about its final height--the structure is 8-feet tall and the city allows only 6 1/2-foot fences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
A proposed ordinance streamlining the process that disabled residents will go through when they apply for building permits or zoning changes was tentatively approved Tuesday by the Long Beach City Council. The council members unanimously decided to join only a few other cities in the United States with special provisions for the disabled in building and zoning code permit approvals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
Long Beach has begun public hearings on a major rezoning plan aimed at making downtown an important regional center. "By bringing together business, residential, redevelopment and historical perspectives we can create an organized development plan for downtown," said planning official Bob Benard. The proposed plan allows unlimited building heights on Ocean Boulevard and encourages construction of restaurants, stores and bars at street level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a simple enough request when the Salvation Army was told it needed to expand its Long Beach-based pre-release program for state prisoners. The new state requirements meant increasing the number of beds from 37 to 45. But the agency was stopped cold when it bumped up against the city's sweeping ban on social service programs in the downtown area. The city gave the agency its check back and refused to process a conditional-use permit for the additional eight beds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996
The Long Beach City Council has approved without dissent zoning variances and amendments to the local coastal plan that would allow the California State University system to construct a $35-million waterfront headquarters building. The variances approved Tuesday apply to a six-story building that would be built across the street from the current headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995
Against a decade of neighborhood opposition, the Long Beach City Council voted 7 to 1 this week to open nine parking spaces in space-squeezed Belmont Shore. For 10 years, the owners of a 3,000-square-foot paved lot at 207 St. Joseph Ave. have wanted to open the area to parking, but their plans were stalled by city regulations and community opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995
Proponents who want to open a halfway house in North Long Beach knew their neighbors would be a hard-sell. For that reason they chose a quiet industrial area surrounded by warehouses to provide job training and housing to 50 nonviolent inmates nearing parole. "How could you find a better location?" said Bob Pratt, president of Volunteers of America, the Los Angeles-based nonprofit group behind the proposed facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1997 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a simple enough request when the Salvation Army was told it needed to expand its Long Beach-based pre-release program for state prisoners. The new state requirements meant increasing the number of beds from 37 to 45. But the agency was stopped cold when it bumped up against the city's sweeping ban on social service programs in the downtown area. The city gave the agency its check back and refused to process a conditional-use permit for the additional eight beds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1994 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Patsy Barggren thought she had a pretty good argument for erecting the tall wood fence around part of her Long Beach home in 1991. Her house had been burglarized several times, cars had been stolen, and she had been feuding with a neighbor, she said. City inspectors OKd the fence in the early stages of construction. But they withdrew the approval after neighbors complained about its final height--the structure is 8-feet tall and the city allows only 6 1/2-foot fences.
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