Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLong Beach Hospitals
IN THE NEWS

Long Beach Hospitals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM, Times Staff Writer
Sure, you can use my name, said Zackery Drew, a 20-year-old former high school valedictorian, with the handsome features of a movie star and, until now, the ugly habits of a drug addict. "I come from an alcoholic family," Drew said recently. "I started drinking at the age of 10. I started using marijuana at the age of 12, and I was under a psychiatrist's care for four years from the age of 12 to 16." A special school got him "clean and sober" for a while. But by age 18, he was hooked on cocaine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Ruben Vives
A 70-year-old man suffered burns early Friday when a fire broke out inside a room at the Long Beach Veterans Administration hospital, fire officials said. According to Long Beach Fire Capt. Jim Arvizu, the fire was reported about 12:40 a.m. at the hospital at 5901 E. 7th St. Firefighters who arrived at the scene saw heavy smoke coming out from one of the windows of the building that houses elderly and hospice patients, Arvizu said. When they made it inside the building, crews discovered that the hospital's sprinkler system had doused the flames.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
This city has an $888-million drug and alcohol problem. According to a new study, that is what it costs the community each year to arrest, prosecute and jail people involved in alcohol- or drug-related crimes; to treat substance-abuse and related medical problems, and to make up for lost productivity and the suffering of victims, among other factors. The economic impact amounts to $2,188 for every resident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2011 | By Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of nurses from Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and Miller Children's Hospital staged a one-day strike Thursday over failed contract negotiations and staffing issues. Equipped with bullhorns and whistles, the nurses stood by the main entrance of the hospitals on Patterson Street and Atlantic Avenue. Many waved picket signs that read: "If nurses are outside, something's wrong inside" and "Safe staffing at all times. " Amid the yelling and cheering for every car horn honk they got, the nurses sang out chants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After suffering steady financial losses since 1995, 76-year-old Long Beach Community Medical Center will close by the end of December and transfer all surgical and acute medical care to St. Mary Medical Center. Officials of Catholic Healthcare West of Southern California, which operates both hospitals, said Friday that they decided to shut down the 278-bed Long Beach Community because an 18-month effort to return the facility to profitability has failed.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1999
* Byron Schweigert has been named chief executive of the 741-bed Long Beach Memorial Medical Center in Long Beach. He had been senior vice president of administration. He succeeds Chris Van Gorder, who was recently named chief of health-care operations for Scripps Health in La Jolla. * Sega GameWorks, a venture formed by DreamWorks SKG, Universal Studios and Sega Enterprises, has named Ron Bension president and chief executive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major campaign to reopen Long Beach Community Hospital has slowed, as a coalition of residents and doctors seeks financial and legal help from city and state officials. For the first time since the 78-year-old hospital closed this fall, several members of the nonprofit group seeking to save it are conceding that they might fail. While the reopening still seems likely, the tentative date, once set for the beginning of January, continues to slide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2011 | By Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of nurses from Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and Miller Children's Hospital staged a one-day strike Thursday over failed contract negotiations and staffing issues. Equipped with bullhorns and whistles, the nurses stood by the main entrance of the hospitals on Patterson Street and Atlantic Avenue. Many waved picket signs that read: "If nurses are outside, something's wrong inside" and "Safe staffing at all times. " Amid the yelling and cheering for every car horn honk they got, the nurses sang out chants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | James Wagner and Jessica Garrison
Hours before he walked into his workplace at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center with two handguns to fatally shoot his bosses and then himself, Mario Ramirez went about his morning routine with his usual kindness and good cheer, his sister-in-law said. He gave his children breakfast, took them to school (he had moved his family to Alhambra because its classrooms seemed safer than those in Boyle Heights) and returned home to get ready for his job as a technician at the hospital's pharmacy.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
When Sepracor Inc. wanted Long Beach Memorial Medical Center to use more of its asthma medicine, the company went to see Melinda Klein. Three published studies touted the benefits of Xopenex for asthma patients requiring emergency care. But Klein, a Memorial pharmacist, thought the medicine looked no better than an inexpensive generic drug. Klein recommended keeping Xopenex off the hospital's list of preferred medicines, or formulary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2005 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
Long Beach Memorial Medical Center has the green light to go forward with a $276-million expansion that will add 72 much-needed pediatric beds in a region that has seen shrinking medical services because of hospital closures or cutbacks. The Long Beach City Council voted 8 to 0 last week to approve a master plan for the project, which had been challenged by a coalition of environmental and labor activists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
More than 1,100 workers at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center voted this week to join the Health Care Workers Alliance. Support staff, including nurses' aides, laboratory technicians and surgical technicians, voted 632 to 261 to join the union, according to tallies released by the labor group Friday. Skilled maintenance workers, such as operating engineers, voted 24 to 14 for the alliance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2002 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
More than 1,000 nurses from Long Beach Memorial Medical Center are planning their second daylong strike Thursday for better wages and pensions as their union allies threaten to boycott the hospital. The recently unionized nurses want a new pension program, better staffing and pay hikes for veteran nurses. If the strike occurs, it will be the second time in three weeks that the nurses have formed a picket line to try to jump-start talks with hospital administrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | APARNA SURENDRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With volunteers scrubbing floors, painting walls and laying carpet for days on end, the stage is almost set for Long Beach Community Medical Center to reopen. Almost 12 months to the day from the time its former owner, Catholic Healthcare West, decided to close it, the hospital is expected to open Monday under a new owner--the Long Beach community. It also will have a slightly different name, Community Hospital of Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major campaign to reopen Long Beach Community Hospital has slowed, as a coalition of residents and doctors seeks financial and legal help from city and state officials. For the first time since the 78-year-old hospital closed this fall, several members of the nonprofit group seeking to save it are conceding that they might fail. While the reopening still seems likely, the tentative date, once set for the beginning of January, continues to slide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long Beach residents may have stopped the closure of their beloved Community Medical Center. But will they still recognize the hospital they have saved? To give the 76-year-old hospital new life, investors and doctors from Termino Avenue to Tennessee will submit proposals this week to reinvent one of Southern California's oldest health care facilities. The result promises to be a leaner facility that is part hospital, part clinic and part school.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|