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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1989
The Long Beach Museum of Art has appointed two new staff members to recently created posts. Sue Ann Robinson, an artist-in-residence at the museum during the last year, is coordinator of education. Robinson has been an art educator for 18 years. Joan van Hooten is the museum's first coordinator of membership and development. A longtime supporter of the museum, Van Hooten has an extensive background in art history, arts administration and fund raising.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
March 17, 2014 | By Carren Jao
 A sliver of a yard can be a powerful thing. Materials & Applications has proved this time and again by collaborating with architects to put up fantastical creations on a 25-by-40-foot gravel yard fronting Silver Lake Boulevard. Past double-take-worthy installations include a golden-leafed Mylar canopy in the shape of a black hole by Ball-Nogues Studio, a motorized vegetative cover that opens and refolds like origami by Eddie Sykes and a sinuous, fire-shaped gazebo made of pressure-laminated panels by Edmund Ming-Yip Kwong.
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NEWS
December 15, 2005 | Mike Boehm
Lacking the resources to conserve one of the nation's oldest museum collections of video art, the Long Beach Museum of Art will transfer its 3,000-plus tapes to the Getty Research Institute -- among them works by Nam June Paik, William Wegman and Bill Viola.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
The room is arranged like a gallery, hung with photographs of various sizes and shapes, framed and unframed, surrounding the artist Catherine Opie, who looks pleased as she observes from a rocking chair. This studio built behind her house in West Adams is where so many moments from her art and life have unfolded. Back in 2004, she made a self-portrait here, topless and tattooed, nursing her young son, Oliver, against a vivid red curtain. Across her chest were scars left over from a much earlier picture, a one-word message carved into her skin and still faintly reading, "Pervert.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993
The Long Beach Museum of Art is one of eight American museums to receive grants for art acquisitions from AT&T's New Art/New Visions program. The three-part program awards challenge grants for acquisitions, exhibitions and educational programs to museums that promote recently created work by living artists, especially women and artists of diverse cultures. Long Beach's new acquisition is "Framed," a mixed media work by Los Angeles artists Bruce and Norman Yonemoto.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Harold B. Nelson had a smile on his face. He was seated at the folding table temporarily serving as his desk in the bare sunlit office. On the table lay a pair of scissors and a catalogue of office products. Directly opposite him, a large picture window afforded a breezy view of the Pacific Ocean lined with palm trees. "I love this place," said Nelson, a crisp, neatly dressed, balding 41-year-old, gazing wistfully out the window. "It's a very diverse community and I find that diversity challenging and appealing."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1997 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Crossing the threshold of Victor Gail and Dick Oxford's neat little house in the Belmont Shore district of Long Beach is akin to stepping back into American history.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
It began as a perception that cultural institutions in this city were not keeping pace with its redevelopment. It evolved into an agreement between the City Council and a private foundation. And if everything goes as expected, a new era will begin next week for the Long Beach Museum of Art. After 30 years as a city institution, the museum--located in a quaint brick building overlooking the sea on Ocean Boulevard--is going private.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A new city audit released this week raises thorny questions about management of the Long Beach Museum of Art, including what it calls the improper spending of $1.6 million in restricted funds earmarked to pay off bonds for the museum's $6.5-million expansion. A second portion of the audit, due next month, is expected to document that some works of art are missing from the 3,000-piece collection of the city-owned museum just east of downtown Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Most people refuse to acknowledge video as an art form and I think the relationship we have with television has a lot to do with that," observes Carole Ann Klonarides, media arts curator at the Long Beach Museum of Art. "We grow up thinking of TV as a cross between a piece of furniture and an appliance--we certainly don't consider it a vehicle for art.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Lea Lion
When Jenine Shereos was hiking in California a few years ago, the Boston-based artist noticed something that stopped her in her tracks: a decomposing maple leaf with only its lace-like veins remaining. She immediately started collecting these “skeleton leaves.” Around the same time, Shereos was experimenting with human hair as an artistic medium. She already had embroidered long strands from her brunette locks in a root-like pattern for a pillow and stitched them into books, like lines of text.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011
Ken Larkey Founder of Long Beach Heritage Museum Ken Larkey, 82, a lifelong collector of Long Beach artifacts who founded the Long Beach Heritage Museum, died of congestive heart failure Friday, said Marshall Pumphrey, the museum's curator. Larkey had a stroke last year and was in hospice care at a Long Beach home, Pumphrey said. Larkey's collection included a 1930s wooden Cyclone Racer roller coaster car from the Pike amusement park, a drug store soda fountain, church pews, theater seats and more than a thousand vintage photos.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2011
Giving little notice and surprising its board co-chairs, Richard P. Townsend has stepped down as president of the Museum of Latin American Art after less than two years in its top spot, the museum announced Tuesday. It's the third change at the top for the Long Beach museum in little more than 31/2 years. "He met with us and said he wanted to pursue other opportunities," said Burke Gumbiner, museum co-chair. "It was voluntary. We thanked him for his contribution. We like the artistic program and are going to continue the artistic program.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Long Beach Museum of Art is facing austerity measures after the City Council cut most of its government funding on Tuesday. The budget passed by the council gives the museum $169,000, down from $569,000 the previous year. The cut will help defray the city's overall budget deficit, but it also was spurred by officials' ire at having to pay off a $3.06-million bond that museum leaders had promised years ago to cover but then failed to when their fund-raising campaign fizzled.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Long Beach Museum of Art's future could be at stake, with a dispute intensifying over whether the 59-year-old museum must pay back $3.06 million the city government grudgingly anted up this week to satisfy bond holders. The museum board had failed to raise that amount to pay the debt from its 2000 renovation and expansion -- and now it says it doesn't have to. Consequently, it risks losing $569,000 in annual operating support from the fiscally beleaguered city -- and the prospect of being branded a deadbeat as it tries to raise about $2 million a year from other donors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
City officials are threatening to sell paintings from the collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art to pay off a $3-million construction bond that comes due in September. Not since Josef Stalin has a civic fiscal plan been quite so dumb. During the winter of 1929-30, as stock markets crashed and the Great Depression brought the global economy to its knees, the Soviet dictator put into action a scheme to raise hard currency -- and fast. Trolling through the vast art collections of the Hermitage Museum, a staggering czarist accumulation that had been nationalized by the Russian revolution, Stalin consummated plans to sell paintings to collectors in the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
City officials are threatening to sell paintings from the collection of the Long Beach Museum of Art to pay off a $3-million construction bond that comes due in September. Not since Josef Stalin has a civic fiscal plan been quite so dumb. During the winter of 1929-30, as stock markets crashed and the Great Depression brought the global economy to its knees, the Soviet dictator put into action a scheme to raise hard currency -- and fast. Trolling through the vast art collections of the Hermitage Museum, a staggering czarist accumulation that had been nationalized by the Russian revolution, Stalin consummated plans to sell paintings to collectors in the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
"Artists' Artists" is the third in a series of exhibitions at the Long Beach Museum exploring the art of collecting. On view through March 4, this installment showcasing the collections of eight Southern California artists is a wildly eclectic grab bag full of wonderful surprises and minor masterworks. Curated by Josine Ianco-Starrels, the show isn't too surprising in that the work these artists collect is pretty much in keeping with the work they themselves make.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2008
Acoustic lineup: KROQ-FM (106.7) will announce today the lineup for the first night of its 18th annual Almost Acoustic Christmas concert on Dec. 13, with headliners the Offspring, Stone Temple Pilots, Staind and AFI. Tickets will go on sale soon for the show at the Gibson Amphitheatre. Settlement: Harold B. Nelson, the former head of the Long Beach Museum of Art who alleged he was fired without justification, settled his lawsuit against the museum's foundation, court papers show. The deal came Tuesday as the case was set to go to trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
A new city audit released this week raises thorny questions about management of the Long Beach Museum of Art, including what it calls the improper spending of $1.6 million in restricted funds earmarked to pay off bonds for the museum's $6.5-million expansion. A second portion of the audit, due next month, is expected to document that some works of art are missing from the 3,000-piece collection of the city-owned museum just east of downtown Long Beach.
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