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Long Beach Museum

NEWS
February 23, 1995 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials at the Long Beach Museum of Art have unveiled the latest plan in their long quest to move from the cramped brick-and-wood house on Ocean Boulevard to a larger facility. This time, officials are considering a sprawling three-story building once occupied by Thrift Village, a secondhand store, on The Promenade downtown. The store at 218 The Promenade closed last year. Museum officials have asked the city's Redevelopment Agency to purchase the building, valued at about $1.
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NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JILL GOTTESMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For nearly a decade, the Long Beach Children's Museum was a place where toddlers could dress up in grandma's flapper hat, fish from a wooden dinghy, sit behind the wheel of a real RTD bus, create puppet shows and run a make-believe hospital room. But this weekend, museum directors will auction off what's left of the interactive learning center, from the child-sized painter's easels to the dress-up garb from Granny's attic. Then they'll lock the front door for the last time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Exhibitions that enlist the aid of art in the service of explicating the sense of a city or locale are notoriously difficult to pull off. "Love in the Ruins: Art and the Inspiration of L.A." is but the latest casualty. The show, which opened Friday at the Long Beach Museum of Art, is an ambitious effort to articulate a complex picture of Los Angeles through the work of 23 artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riots, fires, floods, earthquake, 5,000 aftershocks. Max Almy and Teri Yarbrow of Encino have had no shortage of raw material for their newest artwork about life in a troubled urban paradise. "It's definitely been inspiring," Almy says wryly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As we tumble down the stairs of the '90s, one gets the feeling that when we abruptly land at the bottom in the year 2000, we'll discover that technology has invaded every aspect of human experience. Evidence of that possible eventuality can be seen in "Diaries," an exhibition at the Long Beach Museum of Art showcasing work by four artists who use video as a means of journal-keeping.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993
The Long Beach Museum of Art is one of eight American museums to receive grants for art acquisitions from AT&T's New Art/New Visions program. The three-part program awards challenge grants for acquisitions, exhibitions and educational programs to museums that promote recently created work by living artists, especially women and artists of diverse cultures. Long Beach's new acquisition is "Framed," a mixed media work by Los Angeles artists Bruce and Norman Yonemoto.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Garcia never walks into an elementary school class and says, "Today, we're going to write a poem as an extended metaphor." But by the time he leaves, nearly everyone in the room has written one. Garcia, the Long Beach Museum of Art's poet in residence, frequently conducts workshops for students in local elementary schools. He also does the same at the museum for children and adults. "I come into a class with 30 kids and when I walk out, 28 kids have written a nice poem," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faye Ray, one of the Weimaraners made famous by artist William Wegman, heads a doggy baseball team, clown great Bill Irwin turns into a discomaniac, New York performance artist Alien Comic celebrates lunar lunacy and filmmaker Shu Lea Cheang uses doing laundry as a metaphor for the difficulties of racial assimilation in the United States. This is child's play? Don't think MTV, think art .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Most people refuse to acknowledge video as an art form and I think the relationship we have with television has a lot to do with that," observes Carole Ann Klonarides, media arts curator at the Long Beach Museum of Art. "We grow up thinking of TV as a cross between a piece of furniture and an appliance--we certainly don't consider it a vehicle for art.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | SUSAN PATERNO
Conductor Mark Barville has a great idea for Father's Day. Bring dad and a picnic to the bluffs overlooking the Pacific and listen to the Long Beach Chamber Chorale sing pops tunes that will bring back the old man's youth. "I'm bringing my dad," Barville said. "It's my present to him."
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