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Long Beach Naval Shipyard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1995
I couldn't agree more with The Times' editorial that the defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission should seriously reconsider the recommendation to close the Long Beach Naval Shipyard ("Another Blow to the Region," March 2). The Pentagon's logic in closing this facility simply does not make sense. Long Beach is the most cost-effective and most modern naval shipyard in the country. It has a large dry-dock capable of servicing any ship in the Navy's inventory. It has the largest dry-dock capability south of Puget Sound and is located close to Navy fleet concentrations in Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
In a setback for civilian reuse of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, harbor commissioners Monday canceled their lease with a metals company that has reneged on its agreement to build barges and repair ships on the historic base. The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners voted unanimously to terminate a July agreement with Astoria Metal Corp., which wanted to take over 51 acres of the naval complex and put the largest dry dock on the West Coast back into operation.
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NEWS
December 2, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The federal commission charged with identifying obsolete military installations has notified critics of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard that it will base its recommendations for closings primarily on facilities' military importance--a factor on which the opponents consider Long Beach highly vulnerable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Furthering civilian use of the Long Beach Naval Complex, port commissioners on Monday approved a ship repair facility for part of the former base--a move that could generate at least 500 jobs and put one of the West Coast's largest dry docks back into operation. The Board of Harbor Commissioners for the Port of Long Beach unanimously selected a plan by Astoria Metal Corp. to use 51 acres of land and water space in the now-closed shipyard section of the complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
A Long Beach Naval Shipyard worker fell to his death Monday from a staging platform. The 53-year-old man, whose name was not released, died at St. Mary Medical Center after the 9 a.m. accident in a dry-dock at the Terminal Island facility, said Ernest McBride, shipyard spokesman. "He fell from an elevated staging platform while working in one of the shipyard dry-docks," he said. The victim had been a shipfitter in the structural shop at the shipyard since 1987, McBride said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers stood shoulder to shoulder with their bosses Wednesday as about 2,000 Long Beach Naval Shipyard employees poured into the streets in a noisy protest to save one of the city's largest employers from the Pentagon's ax. "Hell no, we won't go!" workers from 15 labor unions shouted, fists raised, as production came to a lunch-hour standstill at the 47-year-old yard--one of 100 military bases and installations targeted for closure last month by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 3,400 military and civilian employees at the Los Angeles Air Force Base, a research and development branch of the Air Force in El Segundo, could be relocated to Vandenberg Air Force Base under a plan to reduce the defense budget announced Monday by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. The 96-acre base also may lose 361 civilian and military jobs over the next four years under proposed manpower cuts.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials and local communities are bracing for another spate of awful news this week when a federal commission meets to finalize a list of Defense Department facilities to be closed--victims of too many military bases and too few federal dollars. At stake will be thousands of jobs and the shuttering of venerable military installations such as Long Beach Naval Shipyard, McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento and the Point Mugu naval base in Ventura County.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal commission created to review proposed military base closings Friday added another 36 installations, including the Long Beach Naval Shipyard, to the list of bases under consideration for phase-out or force reductions. The unexpected action by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission significantly expands the initial pool of 43 military facilities that the Pentagon has recommended closing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top military officer has opposed a proposal by a federal commission that would close the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and realign the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego. Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has told Deputy Defense Secretary Donald J. Atwood that the two installations are too important militarily to be included on the commission's "hit list" of bases targeted for closure or realignment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles housing tracts declared surplus military property in 1997 have touched off a fierce debate over their future, pitting neighbor against neighbor in a battle over competing public policy goals. The Navy families who lived in these Harbor City and San Pedro neighborhoods moved out nearly two years ago, after the closing of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. They left behind 545 middle-class homes, sitting on wide, curving streets near Los Angeles Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has killed a deal to lease the abandoned Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping company, the Port of Long Beach vowed Friday to find new tenants for the controversial base and to make other accommodations to keep the China Ocean Shipping Co. from leaving the harbor. John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
If you read past the Monica news last week, you may have noticed an odd little item about a shipping firm known as the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco for short. Cosco is not your everyday shipping firm. It's owned and operated by the Chinese government. And it seems that some diehard commie haters in Congress have decided to prevent the company from leasing federally owned land in the United States. We don't normally get into international relations on this page, but bear with me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997
An emergency shelter for the homeless will open its doors today at the former Long Beach Naval Shipyard. The New Image Shelter, which had operated in the National Guard Armory in downtown Long Beach last year, has arranged for bus transportation at numerous pickup points in the Long Beach and San Pedro areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997
Shipyard workers and Long Beach residents will say goodbye today as the 54-year-old Long Beach Naval Shipyard closes its gates. The shipyard will open to the public at 9 a.m. Speeches and musical tributes are scheduled from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with entertainment and picnics to continue into the afternoon. The event is expected to draw about 4,000 people, organizers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
Small manufacturers in the Long Beach area could gain access to an array of industrial technology as city officials prepare to offer leases on machining equipment at the Naval Shipyard, which will close soon. A $30,000 federal grant announced this week is expected to pay for surveys among hundreds of companies that might want to lease specialized computers, lathes and other tools that will become available after the shipyard's closure Sept. 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1997
The last of a series of job fairs is scheduled today for more than 400 Long Beach Naval Shipyard workers still hoping to find new jobs before the facility's scheduled closing Sept. 30. About 40 companies, including aerospace contractor Lockheed Martin, are slated to attend the Terminal Island event, one of several fairs over the past year to be organized by Long Beach and sponsored by the federal Job Training Partnership Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy officially closed its Long Beach installation Monday in quiet resignation, with little ceremony or circumstance. The galley, where 1,000 sailors once ate together, served its final dinner--Salisbury steak and potatoes--to just a few of them Monday. At the barracks, sailors packed belongings and locked doors as they left. In front of the waterfront headquarters, the flagpole stood with no colors. "It's real hard for a lot of people," said Cmdr. Lionel L.
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