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Long Beach Naval Station

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
Many thanks to Robert A. Jones for "History's Last Chance in Long Beach" (Sept. 13), on the proposed disposition of the former Navy base in Long Beach. He made a comparison to what was done in San Francisco when the Presidio of the U.S. Army was deemed surplus and vacated. Constructive actions were taken to preserve the historic site. Long Beach Mayor Beverly O'Neill and the Long Beach Harbor Commission have been obsessed with having the Navy property's structures demolished and the land asphalted over and made into a shipping terminal that they in turn would lease to the Chinese-government-owned China Ocean Shipping Co. Thank God Congress has recently killed the development project, citing the potential threat from China's military.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach on Wednesday said it signed an agreement with a major South Korean shipping line to operate a 375-acre cargo terminal on the site of the former Long Beach Naval Station. That site was the focus of a bitter fight two years ago when the port tried to lease the historic base to a firm owned by the Chinese government. If completed, the deal with the Hanjin Shipping Co.
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NEWS
December 9, 1993
The Long Beach Naval Station is a finalist for one of nine new federal job training centers, Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said recently. Final choices will be made in March. Long Beach was among 25 communities that made it to the final round, he said. "All of these communities have a chance to host Job Corps centers that can give at-risk youth a fighting chance for good jobs and futures of hope and possibility," Reich said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1998
Preservationists appeared in federal court Monday in another attempt to block further demolition of historic buildings at the old Long Beach Naval Station. Two major structures, including the tower of the administration building that served as Pacific Fleet headquarters before World War II, were demolished Nov. 24. Other buildings are scheduled for demolition in the coming weeks. U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson said he would issue a written ruling on the preservationists' request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993
The Long Beach Naval Station could be closed next year instead of in 1996 to save the Defense Department money, officials said Tuesday. Adm. Barney Kelly, commander of the Pacific fleet, recently recommended to Adm. Frank Kelso, the chief of naval operations, that the base be closed earlier than scheduled. Navy officials said Tuesday that no decision has been made. The base was included on the list issued in 1991 by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1992
In a historic ceremony at the Long Beach Naval Station Tuesday, the station's first woman captain handed over command to its first black captain. Capt. Isaiah John Jones, an Alabama native who began his 32-year Navy career at the Long Beach station, has returned as its skipper. Jones assumed the command held by Capt. Patricia A. Tracey, who became the second woman in Navy history to take charge of a station when she was assigned to Long Beach two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990 | GERALD FARIS
When people visit the Peleliu--a helicopter carrier that can transport 2,000 Marines and their amphibious craft into combat--they're fascinated by the massive linked chain that raises and lowers the two anchors. Each link weighs 125 pounds, and the anchors themselves top 40,000 pounds apiece. Another favorite is the signal shack above the ship's bridge--people are always curious what each colorful flag means. The black and white banner, for instance, says the captain is not aboard.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A planned $200-million expansion of Southern California's only Navy weapons depot will not be affected by the proposed shutdown of the neighboring Long Beach Naval Station, military officials said. Even though the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station is a primary installation for ordnance loading and unloading of Long Beach-bound ships, "the impact here will be none," a base spokesman said. Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Christopher Cox told the national base-closing commission Tuesday that he supports the Pentagon's plan to close the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin as long as the military property can be sold for private development. "In the final analysis," Cox said in written testimony, "the Pentagon plan will only make sense if the land that now comprises the Tustin base is sold."
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a shrinking military force and declining defense budgets, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney on Friday proposed padlocking 31 major U.S. military bases. The proposed list includes several California installations, including Ft. Ord in Monterey, Castle Air Force Base in Merced, the Marine Air Station at Tustin, the Long Beach Naval Station and the Navy's Moffett Field in Sunnyvale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1998
In a blow to preservationists making a last-ditch fight to save the old Long Beach Naval Station, two major structures on the historic site, including one designed by a famous African American architect, were demolished Tuesday to make way for a new cargo terminal. Crews dynamited the tower of the administration building, which served as headquarters for the Pacific Fleet before World War II. It was designed by architect Paul Revere Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
Many thanks to Robert A. Jones for "History's Last Chance in Long Beach" (Sept. 13), on the proposed disposition of the former Navy base in Long Beach. He made a comparison to what was done in San Francisco when the Presidio of the U.S. Army was deemed surplus and vacated. Constructive actions were taken to preserve the historic site. Long Beach Mayor Beverly O'Neill and the Long Beach Harbor Commission have been obsessed with having the Navy property's structures demolished and the land asphalted over and made into a shipping terminal that they in turn would lease to the Chinese-government-owned China Ocean Shipping Co. Thank God Congress has recently killed the development project, citing the potential threat from China's military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has killed a deal to lease the abandoned Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping company, the Port of Long Beach vowed Friday to find new tenants for the controversial base and to make other accommodations to keep the China Ocean Shipping Co. from leaving the harbor. John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998
Huell Howser, the host of KCET's "California's Gold," lost his final bid in Los Angeles Superior Court on Monday to prevent the Long Beach Naval Station from being demolished and turned into new cargo terminals. Judge Peter J. Lichtman dismissed Howser's lawsuit against the state Lands Commission, which the TV personality claimed was wasting public assets by allowing Long Beach to destroy historic structures on the naval base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998
In a move designed to expedite construction of new cargo terminals at the Long Beach Naval Station, port commissioners approved an agreement with the U.S. Navy on Monday that would allow the port to lease the abandoned base while the federal government proceeds with environmental cleanup. Port officials say that ownership of the base cannot be conveyed to the port until much of the pollution from shipyard operations has been removed.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snowballing anti-China sentiment on Capitol Hill could deal a death blow to an industrial development project that supporters say would create hundreds of jobs for U.S. workers at the Port of Long Beach. In coming days, the Senate will debate a legislative proposal that would bar Cosco, a shipping company owned by the Chinese government, from leasing a significant portion of what was once the Long Beach Naval Station. The prohibition already has been adopted by the House.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon's Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission, making final recommendations to President Bush on the future of military bases across the country, voted Sunday to spare two military installations in San Diego, while opting to close the Long Beach Naval Station but keep its sister naval shipyard open. In other key votes, the commission agreed to shut down the Army's Ft. Ord near Monterey, the Sacramento Army Depot and the Marine Corps Air Station at Tustin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1994 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even as the flags were marched away and the final ship's bell rang Friday, marking the end of the Long Beach Naval Station, it was clear that few were willing to surrender. * After all, this base was once the epitome of the Navy on the West Coast. The observation tower, the forest of spiked gray masts and swarm of white uniforms were symbols of strength in hard times. "Maybe next year, someone will decide we really need Naval Station Long Beach," said the base commander, Capt. Isaiah J. Jones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolores Sturgill wanted what she feared was to be a last look at the faded Long Beach Naval Station, craved a farewell visit to the site of "so many memories." Her husband, Edward, however, who retired after 42 years in the Navy, wanted no part of the "Anchors Aweigh" walking tour staged Sunday by Long Beach Heritage and two other groups still hoping to save a slice of the historic base from the wrecking ball. "He said he could not come down here today.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second straight day Friday, state Treasurer Matt Fong and electronics entrepreneur Darrell Issa tussled over policy issues and traded insults as they continued their too-close-to-call fight for the Republican U.S. Senate nomination. The two collided on a San Diego County radio show a day after squaring off at a San Jose State University debate.
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