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Long Beach Redevelopment Agency

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1995 | STEVE EAMES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plummeting property values have forced the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency to drastically curtail its efforts to lure new businesses and shoppers to the city's downtown area. The agency, which has pumped millions of dollars into downtown businesses since the mid-1970s, slashed its downtown spending this year from $22.9 million to $13.5 million, and plans to operate at the leaner spending level during the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. Until the agency's financial outlook improves, it will be unable to offer new retailers financial incentives similar to those that brought Crate & Barrel, B.U.M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
John Strange, who has been browsing downtown Long Beach's Acres of Books for about two decades, said the best way to shop the store's 1 million new and used books is to pretend you're a big-game hunter. "Take a helmet and a sandwich and you can go hunting all afternoon," said Strange, 58. "You can either get overwhelmed and intimidated or you could just jump in." But the days of literary expeditions at the store's 12,000-square-foot building on Long Beach Boulevard are apparently numbered.
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NEWS
December 5, 1985
The Long Beach Redevelopment Agency has entered escrow to buy property and leaseholds on two blocks on Long Beach Boulevard across from the Long Beach Plaza mall. Roger Anderman, assistant executive director of the redevelopment agency, said the agency has agreed to buy the closed Sears department store and adjacent parking area for an undisclosed price. Escrow will close by Dec. 31, Anderman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Struggling under the burden of declining real estate values, the redevelopment agency that has financed much of the resurgence of downtown Long Beach is running out of money and wants to borrow $25 million to help meet its payroll. The Long Beach Redevelopment Agency said that without the loan, in the form of tax anticipation bonds, layoffs would begin Oct. 1. The plan to raise the money was distributed to the mayor and City Council this weekend.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Susan Shick, executive director of the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency, has brought a former colleague on board as her redevelopment project officer. She is Barbara Knight, who has been acting director of the Glendale Redevelopment Agency since Shick left that position earlier this year.
NEWS
November 14, 1985
The Long Beach Redevelopment Agency has announced plans to issue a $50-million tax allocation bond to help pay for projects in the downtown redevelopment area. In issuing the bond before the end of the year, Long Beach joins many other redevelopment agencies which are hurrying to take advantage of current tax law before Congress passes new legislation which may curtail their ability to issue tax-exempt bonds. The agency is expected to sell the bond Nov.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | BETTINA BOXALL, Times Staff Writer
More than 1 1/2 years after a task force recommended that the city develop an auto mall to bolster its sales tax income, the City Council has approved a plan to build a 16-dealer mall just south of the 405 Freeway between Orange and California avenues. Long Beach thus joins a host of other Southern California communities that have created auto malls in the hope of laying a golden egg. Just next door to the Long Beach mall will be a smaller one planned by the city of Signal Hill.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The real estate development arm of the Walt Disney Co. won exclusive rights this week to a downtown parcel of land for construction of what could be the biggest hotel in the city. The action Monday by the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency board was the beginning of what could become the city's most important redevelopment project: an 800- to 1,200-room resort hotel linked to a $1-billion theme park at the Queen Mary across the bay. Disney officials recently told City Council members and staff that they are considering building a marine-oriented theme park that would employ 10,000 people.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | TINA GRIEGO
To those who say that downtown Long Beach is nothing but a jumble of blight-ridden blocks seething with crime, city officials have one main response: Remember the '70s. "In 1975, we had a funeral in Long Beach," Assistant City Manager John F. Shirey jokes. "We declared downtown dead." In that year, everything that gave the downtown area its life was either dead or dying. The Lakewood Mall, then one of the largest malls in the world, had sapped the downtown shopping district.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The real estate development arm of the Walt Disney Co. won exclusive rights this week to a downtown parcel of land for construction of what could be the biggest hotel in the city. The action Monday by the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency board was the beginning of what could become the city's most important redevelopment project: an 800- to 1,200-room resort hotel linked to a $1-billion theme park at the Queen Mary across the bay. Disney officials recently told City Council members and staff that they are considering building a marine-oriented theme park that would employ 10,000 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
That a single piece of paper could ward off bulldozers sounded too good to be true for scores of homeowners who crammed Long Beach City Hall in late 1992. Despite pledges of urban renewal, many homeowners refused to have their property included in the city's Central Redevelopment Area, for fear that urban planners would force them out of their homes and find another use for their land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1995 | STEVE EAMES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plummeting property values have forced the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency to drastically curtail its efforts to lure new businesses and shoppers to the city's downtown area. The agency, which has pumped millions of dollars into downtown businesses since the mid-1970s, slashed its downtown spending this year from $22.9 million to $13.5 million, and plans to operate at the leaner spending level during the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. Until the agency's financial outlook improves, it will be unable to offer new retailers financial incentives similar to those that brought Crate & Barrel, B.U.M.
NEWS
February 11, 1993
The Redevelopment Agency board, bowing to public pressure, revised a policy that allowed the executive director of the agency to buy land in parts of downtown and west Long Beach without its approval. The board voted unanimously and with no comment to adopt a policy that requires any land purchases of more than $50,000 to be approved by the board.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to criticism over a recent land purchase, the chairman of the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency board said he wants a review of whether the agency's executive director has too much authority to buy property without board approval. Agency Chairman Don Westerland said that to avoid further controversy he favors eliminating a policy that allows the executive director to buy land in the city's west side and downtown redevelopment areas. A furor has developed over recent revelations that Executive Director Susan Shick approved the purchase of several parcels of land from a company owned by Long Beach Harbor Commissioner Joel Friedland.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | TINA GRIEGO
To those who say that downtown Long Beach is nothing but a jumble of blight-ridden blocks seething with crime, city officials have one main response: Remember the '70s. "In 1975, we had a funeral in Long Beach," Assistant City Manager John F. Shirey jokes. "We declared downtown dead." In that year, everything that gave the downtown area its life was either dead or dying. The Lakewood Mall, then one of the largest malls in the world, had sapped the downtown shopping district.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Susan Shick, executive director of the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency, has brought a former colleague on board as her redevelopment project officer. She is Barbara Knight, who has been acting director of the Glendale Redevelopment Agency since Shick left that position earlier this year.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
The real estate development arm of the Walt Disney Co. won exclusive rights this week to a downtown parcel of land for construction of what could be the biggest hotel in the city. The action Monday by the Long Beach Redevelopment Agency board was the beginning of what could become the city's most important redevelopment project: an 800- to 1,200-room resort hotel linked to a $1-billion theme park at the Queen Mary across the bay. Disney officials recently told City Council members and staff that they are considering building a marine-oriented theme park that would employ 10,000 people.
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