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Long Beach Unified School District

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2002 | JOSE CARDENAS and SANDRA MURILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The grim story of the calm, bald gunman who killed a checker and a little girl at a Long Beach supermarket grew more bizarre Friday as police revealed a startling discovery: The remains of two people found in the man's condo a block from the store had been there more than a year. The bodies of the unidentified pair--so decomposed that even gender identification was daunting--were lying on a bed in a back bedroom where a window overlooks the Top Valu Market, the scene of the gunfire Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2002 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Two California educators known for promoting opportunities for minorities are among the winners of the 2001 Harold W. McGraw Jr. Prize in education, one of the most prestigious honors in the field. One of the winners is Carl W. Cohn, 56, chief of the 96,000-student Long Beach Unified School District, who is the longest-serving head of an urban district in the nation. After 10 years at that post, he plans to leave this summer for a teaching position at USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Some of California's largest school districts are plagued by persistent racial inequities that hurt minority youths' chances of going to college and force many students to attend substandard facilities, according to a recently released study by Californians for Justice.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even as a school testing contractor scrambles to correct a scoring error on statewide achievement tests, an additional problem in Long Beach has resulted in a warning for districts throughout the state to check their results. San Antonio-based Harcourt Educational Measurement acknowledged the problem but said it could not be corrected before next week, when statewide data are expected to be posted on the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a windfall $295 million heading for their coffers, Long Beach school officials will begin prioritizing the repairs and construction to be funded by the bond measure passed Tuesday. Final poll results show that 71% of the voters in the Long Beach Unified School District approved the bond measure, which required a two-thirds majority for passage. In all, 34,778 voters in Long Beach, Lakewood, Signal Hill and on Catalina Island voted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1999
Voters will decide today on a bond measure that would allow the Long Beach school district to spend $295 million to build schools and repair and upgrade existing facilities over 30 years. If Measure A is approved, funds would total $495 million with the addition of $200 million in matching state funds. Money would be spent to repair and upgrade plumbing, heating and ventilation, upgrade electrical systems for computers and build 13 schools. No argument was filed against the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998
Five high schools in the Long Beach Unified School District have been promised state and federal grants totaling more than $8.5 million, district officials said Tuesday. Lakewood, Jordan and Millikan high schools were selected at random for state grants of more than $1 million each to upgrade their computer technology, said district spokesman Richard Van Der Laan. In addition, Cabrillo and Wilson high schools are slated to receive federal grants together worth more than $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A classroom crunch in Long Beach has forced teachers and students to meet not only in portable facilities but also in libraries, auditoriums and--in at least one case--an open-air courtyard. The crunch comes in the wake of a surge in student enrollment seen across Los Angeles County just as school districts begin class size reductions in the third grade. Most districts, however, were able to absorb the enrollment growth with few problems.
NEWS
May 9, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with their books and backpacks, more than 6,000 students took firearms to school during the 1996-1997 academic year and were expelled, according to a report released Friday by the U.S. Department of Education. "This report is a clear indication that our nation's public schools are cracking down on students who bring guns to school," Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley said in a statement. The report gives the first state-by-state view of the impact of the Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
Prompted by a statewide shortage of teachers, the Capistrano Unified School District has approved plans to cultivate its own--becoming the first in Orange County to adopt a formal program to train and pay for instructional aides to become teachers. After earning their bachelor's degrees and teaching credentials, the new teachers would have to agree to stay with the district the same amount of time they went to school under the program.
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