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Long Qt Syndrome

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HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
His youngest son had several seizures at age 4, said Bruce of Smithtown, N.Y. All the tests came back normal, but the neurologist treated him for epilepsy. About two years ago, his son, then 6, was in the deep end of the pool, where he took an abnormally long time resurfacing, said his father, who asked that his last name not be used. When he came up, his son was crying and told his parents he had been "dreaming" under the water, which they interpreted as a fainting spell.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
UFC heavyweight fighter Shane del Rosario, who was admitted to Hoag Hospital on Tuesday, may suffer from a rare genetic anomaly that causes an abnormal heart rhythm, according to his manager. Del Rosario, 30, arrived at the Newport Beach hospital in full cardiac arrest , but doctors resuscitated him and stabilized his heart rhythm and blood pressure, manager Jason House said in an email. The fighter, who lives in Newport Beach, has not regained consciousness but "continues to cling to life," House said Friday afternoon.
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NEWS
January 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
A newly identified gene has been linked to about 55% of cases of an inherited heart disorder that can kill young, otherwise healthy people. It's the third gene to be found for the inherited form of the illness known as long QT syndrome, which affects an estimated 20,000 Americans and is thought to cause 50 to 200 deaths a year. People with the disorder have an increased risk for episodes in which their heart races at 300 to 400 beats a minute, too fast to pump blood effectively.
HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
His youngest son had several seizures at age 4, said Bruce of Smithtown, N.Y. All the tests came back normal, but the neurologist treated him for epilepsy. About two years ago, his son, then 6, was in the deep end of the pool, where he took an abnormally long time resurfacing, said his father, who asked that his last name not be used. When he came up, his son was crying and told his parents he had been "dreaming" under the water, which they interpreted as a fainting spell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
UFC heavyweight fighter Shane del Rosario, who was admitted to Hoag Hospital on Tuesday, may suffer from a rare genetic anomaly that causes an abnormal heart rhythm, according to his manager. Del Rosario, 30, arrived at the Newport Beach hospital in full cardiac arrest , but doctors resuscitated him and stabilized his heart rhythm and blood pressure, manager Jason House said in an email. The fighter, who lives in Newport Beach, has not regained consciousness but "continues to cling to life," House said Friday afternoon.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Doris Goldman is the quintessential professional. On a recent weekday, she is in her glass-walled office early, having made the short walk from a modern condominium complex across the street, home to hard-core Irvine business executives who can't waste time on a long commute. She has a lot on her mind today: the Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, 20-20. She has to get through to all of them. Twist their arms. Make them listen. The media can reach a lot of people fast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1999
A genetic defect that disrupts the heart's rhythm may explain many of the hundreds of mysterious drownings of children and teenagers in the United States each year. Many young people's drownings can be attributed to lack of supervision, alcohol or drug abuse, trauma or seizures. But roughly 10% of them have no explanation. Now scientists, writing in today's New England Journal of Medicine, believe a defect called long-QT syndrome may provide an answer.
SPORTS
January 8, 2003 | Mike Terry, Times Staff Writer
Former El Toro High basketball standouts Giuliana and Gioconda Mendiola, now playing for the University of Washington, are among five players credited with saving the life of teammate Kayla Burt. The Mendiolas and their teammates were at Burt's off-campus residence on New Year's Eve, when the sophomore forward complained of feeling lightheaded. She then collapsed onto her bed, unconscious.
HEALTH
November 19, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A simple new ultrasound test may be able to rule out the presence of Down syndrome in many fetuses, often eliminating the need for more invasive tests that carry a risk of miscarriage. The test measures the length of the nasal (nose) bone of the fetus during the twelfth week of pregnancy, Dr. Kypros Nicolaides of King's College Hospital in London reported in the Nov. 17 issue of Lancet.
SPORTS
September 30, 2006 | Lance Pugmire, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five days ago, Kasey Kahne had written off his chances in the Chase for the NASCAR Nextel Cup. But even before his pole-winning performance Friday at Kansas Speedway, his confidence was back. "On Sunday, I had just hit another car," said Kahne, who dropped to ninth in the Chase standings -- 182 points off the lead -- when he got caught in Tony Stewart's spinout and finished 38th at Dover, Del. "I was devastated. Today, I've been able to think about it for a week. Things change."
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
A newly identified gene has been linked to about 55% of cases of an inherited heart disorder that can kill young, otherwise healthy people. It's the third gene to be found for the inherited form of the illness known as long QT syndrome, which affects an estimated 20,000 Americans and is thought to cause 50 to 200 deaths a year. People with the disorder have an increased risk for episodes in which their heart races at 300 to 400 beats a minute, too fast to pump blood effectively.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Doris Goldman is the quintessential professional. On a recent weekday, she is in her glass-walled office early, having made the short walk from a modern condominium complex across the street, home to hard-core Irvine business executives who can't waste time on a long commute. She has a lot on her mind today: the Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, 20-20. She has to get through to all of them. Twist their arms. Make them listen. The media can reach a lot of people fast.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Cardiovascular disease has been the leading killer of Americans every year since 1918. But researchers are trying hard to alter that. * During this week's annual American Heart Assn. meeting, which concluded Thursday in Anaheim, more than 3,000 studies were presented.
SPORTS
February 1, 2005 | Mike Terry, Times Staff Writer
Like most young adults, Kayla Burt rarely thought about dying. Mortality isn't often a topic for a 20-year-old sophomore playing basketball at the University of Washington. But as a 22-year-old junior, Burt thinks different. That's because two years ago -- Dec. 31, 2002, to be exact -- Burt's heart stopped beating. She was lucky. She was in her apartment at the time, surrounded by five teammates.
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